Make outside bets for better odds of winning. As long as you make the table minimum for each individual bet, you can make multiple outside bets to increase your odds of a payout. For instance, if you wager $1 on even and $1 on black, you’ll win a $2 payout if the ball lands on black 10, and you’ll break even if it lands on red 16. Along with even/odd and red/black, which offer payouts of 1:1, outside bets include:[2]

They are equal in that there are 18 red and 18 black numbers on a roulette wheel. The 0 and 00 are both green numbers. However, there are 10 odd red numbers and 8 even red numbers. Also,the opposite is true in that there are 10 even black numbers and 8 odd black numbers. If you bet even and red or odd and black it seems you would have a slight edge as you would be covering 20 numbers instead of 18.


If you’re like most players, your strategy would be to use a trigger, then betting progression. A trigger is simply an event you wait to occur before betting. For example, the trigger may be wait for 3 REDS to spin in a row. Your bet would then be doubling bet size until you win. But again this wont work because the odds haven’t changed, the payouts are the same, and all you’re doing is making difference size bets on independent spins.
If you're not using this service yet, then what are you doing with your life? Broadway Roulette is NYC's best kept secret. $55 for broadway tickets? Heck yes! The surprise of not knowing what show you'll be seeing until the morning of? Even more heck yes! Plus amazing, extremely personable customer service? That's a hell yes! Oh, and did I mention that there's a possibility of seeing Hamilton? HELLS TO THE YEAH!
Red/black, even/odd, and 1-18/19-36 pay even money, which means you win the same amount that you bet.  (Bet $5, win $5.)  The other bets pay more, because they're less likely to win.  In fact, Roulette gives you the chance to win 35 times your bet (a winning bet placed on a single number).  In this way, Roulette is more like slots: one single bet can win a lot.   (It's also like slots in that the house edge is very high.)

Make outside bets for better odds of winning. As long as you make the table minimum for each individual bet, you can make multiple outside bets to increase your odds of a payout. For instance, if you wager $1 on even and $1 on black, you’ll win a $2 payout if the ball lands on black 10, and you’ll break even if it lands on red 16. Along with even/odd and red/black, which offer payouts of 1:1, outside bets include:[2]

You can get your chips in different monetary denominations. When you hand the dealer your chips, he or she will ask what denomination you want to designate your chips. If you're at a $5 minimum table, you could make them $1 or you could make them $100 (or anywhere in between). Once you've chosen, they'll place a chip on top of the rail, with a marker on top of that to indicate your colored chips' value.[5]


Know a bit about the Fibonacci strategy. Leonardo Pisano Bigollo, also known as Fibonacci, was a famous Italian mathematician who discovered an interesting sequence of numbers which are now named after him. The sequence goes as follows, with numbers generated by adding the last two digits together: 1 - 1 - 2 - 3 - 5 - 8 - 13 - 21 - 34 - 55 - 89 - 144 - 233 - 377 - 610.[7]


The “house edge” is what enables the casino to profit. An example is the European wheel has 37 pockets, but a 35-1 payout on single numbers. So if you win 1 in 37 as you’d expect with random bet selection, you’d be paid 35 units plus your original bet, leaving you with 36 units. But if roulette’s payouts were fair, you’d be left with 37 units after the 37 spins. Simply the house edge is unfair payouts. And it affects every bet and every roulette strategy. Even when you win, you are still getting paid unfairly.

First, note that while tickets are billed at just $59 on weekends, after the ticketing fee ($7) and the $10 upgrade to cross off two additional shows (something you'll want to do if you're a person who sees Broadway shows more often than just once in awhile) the ticket is closer to $79, which is what most shows (excluding the hyped productions like Hamilton, Springsteen, Dear Evan Hansen, Book of Mormon, etc.) start at, anyway.
Put another way, imagine waiting many years to see the spin sequence 1,2,3,4,5. It seems really rare, and you bet that #6 wont spin next. But actually the odds of #6 spinning next are the same as any other number.  Run some proper simulations and you’ll see no matter how you play it, you cannot change your odds by betting that rare events wont happen.
Roulette was probably the first true casino game and was likely introduced in the middle ages. Noblemen attempted to beat roulette with various roulette systems of play. If we had a time machine we could go back and tell them that the systems they invented and used, while fun, just couldn’t give them a true mathematical edge over the casino. Luckily the peasants didn’t play in casinos because, well, after all they were peasants.

A lot of players like to watch the past few spins and look for a pattern to try to predict the outcome of the next spin. You’ll see people wait until there are a bunch of red spins in a row and then start betting black heavily because they feel it is much more likely to come out. While this can be a fun strategy and make the game more entertaining, it won’t give you a mathematical edge over the casino. Each spin is 100% independent of the last. This means that no matter what was spin before, the next spin will be completely random.

Now, on Broadway Roulette's website FAQ section, they say "We do not include any partial view seats in our mix". However, my friends got LAST ROW of orchestra. They were not only extremely far from the stage, but worse, whenever King Kong stood up, they could not even see his head because of the extreme mezzanine overhang. My friends ended up paying above average for their tickets but got some of the worst seats in the Broadway Theatre, arguably quite partial in view.
×