Why do so many people love to gamble? Is it merely a matter of winning money? There is more to it than just that. The player’s emotions add a lot to the games and perhaps the strongest emotion is the thrill of anticipation. To keep that thrill alive players have to resist the desire to play faster and faster. Slow-play keeps the adrenaline pumping. Fast play puts us into a kind of funk.
The purpose of roulette is to try to predict the outcome of where the white ball will land on each spin of the wheel. If we could only try to guess what number that was, the game would be a bit boring, as there would be no variety and it would get way too repetitive. Fortunately, the designers of the game have built in tons of betting options to make the game much more exciting, versatile, and downright fun. Let’s take a look at a few of the different categories of bets you can make.
Here's another example: Since there are 38 slots on the wheel, we expect any given number to hit 1 out of 38 spins on average.  Now let's say you've been playing Roulette for a few hours, betting on Red every time, and you've been keeping track of what numbers have hit.  There have been 152 spins (4 x 38), and so we expect that each number should have come up 4 times on average.  You note, with some surprise, that #14 hasn't come up at all.  Does this mean that #14 is "due" and that you should bet on #14?  No.  Number 14 is not "due", no number is ever "due".  The wheel has no memory.
A slightly more complex betting strategy, this system is based on the famous Fibonnaci sequence – 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, and so on, with each number being the sum of the previous two numbers. This sequence of numbers was conceived by the 13th century Italian mathematician Leonardo Pisano Bigollo, who first brought the Arabic numeral system to the west. To apply it to roulette, start your play with a real money online casino bet, and then simply apply this sequence with a matching bet increase every time you lose. Let’s say for example you bet $1. If you lose your bet, next time round you’ll bet $2 – then you’ll go from $2 to $3, $3 to $5, and up the rest of the sequence. Should you win your first bet, you’ll start again at $1. If you win further down the sequence, cross off the last two numbers at the point where you began to win, and start from the next one. The theory underpinning the system is that each lost bet will be recouped by betting the lost amount on the next wager, covering consecutive losses by moving up and down the numerical sequence. While a viable theory, like the Martingale, you could end up blowing your bankroll if you hit a solid losing streak.
It’s important to note that you don’t have to guess the number exactly, but you can guess characteristics of the number and still get paid. For example, if you choose to bet that the number rolled will be odd, you will get paid if the number determined by the white ball is odd. It doesn’t matter to you if it’s 13 or 31; you will still get paid on your bet.
Roulette games have minimum bets, which will be posted on a placard at the table.  Minimum bets work differently for inside bets (specific numbers) and outside bets (everything else).  For outside bets, any bet you make has to be at least the table minimum.  Inside bets can usually be as small as you like, as long as the total of all your inside bets is the table minimum.  For example, with a table minimum of $5, you could put $5 on #14, or $1 each on #14, #27, #8/9, #28/29/30, and #19/20/22/23.  Remember that you can bet inside or outside if you like; there's no requirement to bet both on a given spin.
Even if there isn't a betting limit, and if you have an infinite credit limit, it still doesn't really work, it just doesn't really fail either. If the martingale strategy is continued indefinitely and without regard to betting limits, your bankroll will hit arbitrarily high positive and negative values. The expected value is still negative, but the variation is so high that it your bankroll won't stay either negative or positive.
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