So what were some of the most famous systems used by our ancestors in attempting to beat the wheel? Are any of these still used today when people are learning how to play roulette? I can easily answer both of these questions, with the latter first: Yes! the systems of the past are still used today. Why? Because they are fun to play and structure a player’s game-plan in a way that makes sense to the player. A player always knows what to do next when playing a system. There’s no guesswork in how or what to do next.
Those of you have gambled in a casino, even only a few times, have probably stumbled on the Martingale system, even if you didn’t know the word Martingale. You might have even figured you invented it. I know I did. It seems this is the very first concept most gamblers have and it is expressed in the following phrase: “I have to win sooner or later, right?” 
The history of the game begins more than 300 years ago, at the end of the 17th century, with Frenchman Blaise Pascal being credited with this invention. Apparently, he was trying to create a perpetual motion machine as he was studying probabilities, but the outcome took him by surprise. The roulette wheel gained a lot of traction relatively quickly and by the end of the century, it was a popular game in Paris.
I would use a Martingale only on the even-money outside bets at roulette, the odd or even, high or low, red or black. These bets give the player 18 chances to win with 20 chances to lose on the American double-zero wheels and 18 chances to win with 19 chances to lose on the European Roulette (single-zero wheels). Obviously, if you can play the European wheel that is the preferred one as long as the betting ranges fit your bankroll.
If you want to go big but the straight bet gives you the cold sweats, you can still go for a higher reward with a lower risk and choose the split bet instead. This involves placing chips on any two numbers that are next to one another on the felt. This can be either horizontal or vertical placement, and to place the bet you put a chip on the line between the two numbers.
The “house edge” is what enables the casino to profit. An example is the European wheel has 37 pockets, but a 35-1 payout on single numbers. So if you win 1 in 37 as you’d expect with random bet selection, you’d be paid 35 units plus your original bet, leaving you with 36 units. But if roulette’s payouts were fair, you’d be left with 37 units after the 37 spins. Simply the house edge is unfair payouts. And it affects every bet and every roulette strategy. Even when you win, you are still getting paid unfairly.

One of the most well-known systems when it comes to betting on roulette is the Martingale strategy. It is a very simple doubling up betting system. For example, if you start off by betting £10 on red and it comes in black, double your next bet to £20 on red. You need to keep on doing this until it lands on a red and this will cover your losses. The only thing to think about before embarking on this strategy is whether you have enough money to lose before that first winning spin.


Now you have a total of 36 chips, and you want to break these down into 6 stacks of 6 chips (when playing online Roulette, you won’t actually be able to break the chips down into stacks, but you should just place 6 bets of 6 chips). Next you need to cover 6 corner bets with your 6 chip stacks. Make sure you spread them out as much as possible and do not double up on any numbers so you have as much of the table covered as possible.
Your first bet is $10 (or whatever your normal bet size is) on one of the even-money proposition wagers. If you lose that bet, you go to $20. Now, you sit out two spins; correct, you do not bet. After two sit-outs, on the next spin, you will increase your bet to $40. If you lose that? You quit and go back to your original bet. You’ve lost $70 on this sequence.
This betting option is one of the most diverse offered, with several different options. Basically, instead of just betting on one number, you have the option to bet on a group of numbers. This can be as wide of a range as 1-18 or 19-36, or as tight of a range as picking two numbers like 1 and 2. Ranges in between are also available for players to choose.
I've seen 6 musicals since December 2017, and I've yet to be disappointed. So far, I've seen: the Band's Visit (Seriously. You need to see this mesmerizing musical), a Bronx Tale (Slightly derivative, but 100% enjoyable), Kinky Boots (I dare you not to have a good time at this one.), Beautiful (gorgeous theatre location), Spongebob Squarepants the Musical (So much fun and that music! Yes, please!), and School of Rock (What I wouldn't have given to see the original cast, but wow! They are still killing it!). I use this service probably way more than I should, but I can't help it! It's honestly the only way I will ever see Broadway.
I do not recommend Broadway Roulette. It seemed like it was going to be a great deal. When in reality, I ended up spending $79 per ticket for four of us. We were in the dead last row of the first balcony and saw "The Prom".  I should have known that what seemed like it was too good to be true...was too good to be true. Broadway Roulette informed me that the face value ticket price was $89. The price on the actual ticket was $57, and I paid $79. I only saved $10 per ticket on a show that I didn't particularly want to see in the first place, and had bad seats. You are better off going to the box office of the shows you really want to see the day of the performance.  But for someone that goes to a lot of shows and doesn't care what they see, or where they sit...maybe Broadway Roulette is for you.
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