Due to the addition of an extra zero in American Roulette, the house edge is increased to an unfavorable 5.26% compared to its European counterpart. European Roulette has halved house edge due to its use of a single zero, making it 2.7%. If you’re a fan of American Roulette, by all means take a spin; but it’s good especially as a beginner to keep in mind that the house has a greater advantage of taking your money.
Leonardo of Pisa, also known as Fibonacci, was a famous Italian mathematician who wrote about a specific series of numbers in the early 1200’s. While the series was around over a thousand years before Fibonacci, the series was dubbed the “Fibonacci sequence” in the nineteenth century. Basically, the sequence is characterized by the fact that every number after the first two is the sum of the two preceding ones. So, the Fibonacci go like this: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, etc.
Over the course of time, casinos decided to improve the house edge and since imagination is not their strong suit, the solution was to add another zero. The betting table changed its structure many times and when the game was imported to America, these changes grew numerous. French Roulette has a more traditional layout and offers better odds for players, while adding two special rules for the connoisseurs. 

On an American wheel, there are 38 spots: numbers 1-36, plus 0 and 00.  Your odds of winning a one-number bet are 37 to 1 (37 ways to lose, 1 way to win).  But if you win, the casino doesn't pay you 37 to 1, they pay you less: 35 to 1.  The difference between the true odds and what they actually pay you is 2/38, or 5.26%.  You can do this same calculation for the other bets, and it comes out the same.
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