In most casinos players can continue making bets even while the ball is still spinning.  When the ball is close to dropping, the dealer will wave her hand over the table, which means "No more bets."  When the ball falls into a slot, the dealer will announce the number and the color, and place a marker on the winning number on the layout.  Then she'll scoop up all the losing bets towards the dealer area.  Next, she'll make the payouts by putting the winning chips next to the original bets.  After she's stacked up all the winning chips, she'll remove the marker, and then you can grab any chips you won.  Don't reach for your winnings until the dealer removes the marker, or the dealer will scold you!  New players often have to be told this repeatedly the first time they play because they kept forgetting and because they're excited about collecting their winnings.
In other games the color of the chip denotes the denomination, but in Roulette the color denotes only which player the chip belongs to.  Roulette chips can in fact be any denomination—$1, $5, $25, etc.  When you buy in, tell the dealer what denomination you want. He'll put a marker on his stack of chips that are the same color to note how much each of your chips is worth.  Because roulette chips are non-denominational, you can't use them in other table games.  When you're done playing roulette, give your chips to the dealer and she'll exchange them for regular, denominational chips.
Like all betting strategies, in the long run the math is against you. This way of playing (aka "Martingale") will be successful only in the short term. Yes, you will see it work say, 9 times out of 10, but the winnings from your 9 successful session will not cover your losings from the 1 losing session you are bound to come across sooner or later. Casinos always have the edge on your money rather than the other way around. Statistically, this is like selling a lottery ticket. You have a large chance of a small win (the selling price of a losing ticket), but a small chance of a big loss (owing the holder of a winning ticket).
Due to the addition of an extra zero in American Roulette, the house edge is increased to an unfavorable 5.26% compared to its European counterpart. European Roulette has halved house edge due to its use of a single zero, making it 2.7%. If you’re a fan of American Roulette, by all means take a spin; but it’s good especially as a beginner to keep in mind that the house has a greater advantage of taking your money.
You will either have a positive or negative edge, and waiting for something to happen like a sequence of numbers will not improve your chances of winning. The exception is if the “trigger” is directly related to a sequence of spins caused by physical variables of the wheel and ball. For example, if the trigger was “bet on whatever number that won most in 10,000 spins”, then this is bias analysis. But the “triggers” that have no effect are like “wait for 5 reds in a row then bet black”.

I've seen 6 musicals since December 2017, and I've yet to be disappointed. So far, I've seen: the Band's Visit (Seriously. You need to see this mesmerizing musical), a Bronx Tale (Slightly derivative, but 100% enjoyable), Kinky Boots (I dare you not to have a good time at this one.), Beautiful (gorgeous theatre location), Spongebob Squarepants the Musical (So much fun and that music! Yes, please!), and School of Rock (What I wouldn't have given to see the original cast, but wow! They are still killing it!). I use this service probably way more than I should, but I can't help it! It's honestly the only way I will ever see Broadway.


Few games in a casino are as intimidating to a beginner as the Roulette table – a sea of numbers, colors, and apparent impossibilities. Isn’t it easier to just go press buttons and watch reels spin on a slots machine instead? Surprisingly, no. While the Roulette table may seem confusing at first glance, in fact it’s a wonderfully simple casino game to understand… once you get the hang of it, of course. The key is to learn how to bet properly.
Leonardo of Pisa, also known as Fibonacci, was a famous Italian mathematician who wrote about a specific series of numbers in the early 1200’s. While the series was around over a thousand years before Fibonacci, the series was dubbed the “Fibonacci sequence” in the nineteenth century. Basically, the sequence is characterized by the fact that every number after the first two is the sum of the two preceding ones. So, the Fibonacci go like this: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, etc.

For any complete novices out there, a roulette wheel is made up of 37 numbered pockets (or 38 if you are playing American roulette – and as an initial piece of advice you shouldn’t, as it decreases your chances of winning!). Half of these numbers are coloured red and half are black with the ‘0’ pocket green. A small ball is introduced when the wheel is spinning and players must predict where the ball will land.
I love this concept and the experience. If you are open to seeing any show, then give Broadway Roulette a chance. I love musicals and have seen many so I am always open to a new one. I love that you get to cross off several allowing you to narrow down your list. I have done it twice and won, The Prom and Be More Chill. Seats were wonderful and I normally wouldn't have selected either show but both were fantastic. Can't wait to spin again.
Most players don’t understand is this is no different to 4 different players making 4 different bets. And the odds of winning and payout are the same regardless. So what has the player changed with progression? Absolutely nothing except the amount they bet. The chances of winning or losing are the same on each spin. So if your system doesn’t win with flat betting (no progression), then it will fail with progression.
Cross-reference roulette system: Cross referencing is a type of analysis where all available data is considered, and used to detect usable patterns. What makes it special is the data cross-referenced to ensure accuracy. This enables the player to better find hidden patterns in spins, and in less time. Also it enables players to quickly adjust when conditions at the wheel change. The method of cross referencing is not exclusive to roulette, and can be applied to other casino games. But this particular roulette system is combined with other predictive methods that are exclusive to roulette.
Some French tables will employ rules that generally help out the players. The "La Partage" and "En Prison" rules apply to outside even money bets like odds or even, black or red and low or high; they also apply when the ball lands in the zero slot. They are similar in the sense that players only lose half of their bet, but players cannot leave their bet on the table for another spin with the La Partage rule. If a player loses, they can collect half their bet in the En Prison rule, or leave half their bet on the table for the next spin with the La Partage rule.
The argument frequently cited in support of this claim is that the numbers on the wheel will add up to 666, so there definitely has to be something unholy going on. You don’t need to a big fan of Goethe and his Faust to fall in love with the game though, but this theory could come in handy when going through a rough streak. It is always better to blame somebody else for your downswings, especially the devil, instead of taking responsibility for erratic gambling behavior.
Yes, there are now plenty of online casino sites that offer real games as in r-e-a-l games! That’s right, you will have a live dealer spinning that real roulette ball and calling out the winners. A live dealer. A person. These are real games. It is important to carefully manage your money while playing casino games in your home as there can be (for some) a tendency to overdo it. Don’t let yourself become numb!

Put another way, imagine waiting many years to see the spin sequence 1,2,3,4,5. It seems really rare, and you bet that #6 wont spin next. But actually the odds of #6 spinning next are the same as any other number.  Run some proper simulations and you’ll see no matter how you play it, you cannot change your odds by betting that rare events wont happen.
Here's another way to look at it:  Let's say you bet $10 on every number, one bet on each of the 38 spots.  So you've just thrown down $380 in bets.  Only one of those numbers will win, and will pay 35 to 1, so you'll get back $360 (the $350 you won plus your original $10 bet on that number).  You bet a total of $380 but you walked away with only $360, so you lost $20.  That $20 you lost represents the house edge of 5.26% ($20 lost divided by the $380 that you bet; $20 ÷ $380 = 5.26%).
In North America and the Caribbean, roulette wheels have a double zero, and all bets (except a direct bet on the selected zero) are lost when either zero turns up. The result is significantly poorer odds for the punter and an increase in the Casino's cut. This is probably why in this region, Roulette is less popular than it is in other parts of the world.
Even if there isn't a betting limit, and if you have an infinite credit limit, it still doesn't really work, it just doesn't really fail either. If the martingale strategy is continued indefinitely and without regard to betting limits, your bankroll will hit arbitrarily high positive and negative values. The expected value is still negative, but the variation is so high that it your bankroll won't stay either negative or positive.
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