Yes, there are now plenty of online casino sites that offer real games as in r-e-a-l games! That’s right, you will have a live dealer spinning that real roulette ball and calling out the winners. A live dealer. A person. These are real games. It is important to carefully manage your money while playing casino games in your home as there can be (for some) a tendency to overdo it. Don’t let yourself become numb!
Know a bit about the Fibonacci strategy. Leonardo Pisano Bigollo, also known as Fibonacci, was a famous Italian mathematician who discovered an interesting sequence of numbers which are now named after him. The sequence goes as follows, with numbers generated by adding the last two digits together: 1 - 1 - 2 - 3 - 5 - 8 - 13 - 21 - 34 - 55 - 89 - 144 - 233 - 377 - 610.[7]
Of course, casinos tend to frown on precise measurements and computer simulations by their gamblers, so the researchers developed a simpler method of predicting the outcome of a roulette game that could be deployed without notice. The first step is simply for a player to note the time it takes for the ball to pass a fixed point to get a rough approximation of the velocity of the ball. That approach, according to the researchers, produces results that " although noisy, are feasible" for making predictions.
If you want to go big but the straight bet gives you the cold sweats, you can still go for a higher reward with a lower risk and choose the split bet instead. This involves placing chips on any two numbers that are next to one another on the felt. This can be either horizontal or vertical placement, and to place the bet you put a chip on the line between the two numbers.

Crossing off only four shows leaves you with a lot of chances to receive a show you've already seen, and it's hard not to feel like the selection process is rigged when you a) don't get to see the wheel actually spin and b) following along on social media shows that a majority of people see the same few shows: Kinky Boots, Waitress, Head Over Heels and The Prom. These are shows that you could easily pick up a discounted ticket to using BroadwayBox or purchasing last-minute on StubHub, if not directly from the box office, where tickets usually start around this price, anyway. For example, weekend tickets to The Prom start at $69, to Kinky Boots, $79, and to Head Over Heels, just $49.


Being organised is a good trait when it comes to roulette. Another one of the roulette betting tips that uses this to good effect is the La Bouchere system. Here you decide how much you want to win – let’s say 30 chips – and split the amount into sections: 4, 8, 6, 4, 6, 2. You take the numbers on the outside – here it would be 4 and 2 – and add them together to make your stake. You then bet on one of the 50:50 outside bets such as even. Repeat this until you have used all your chips. If any of the bets don’t win you add the total stake to one of the ends and bet as before. The system predicts that you should be able to end up with your desired amount of winnings. And that is when you leave the table before you discard the system and bet uncontrollably!

This seems to be a tough one for people to comprehend, for some reason. The real reason is that people probably wish it weren’t the case. Vegas was not built on winners. Casinos will ALWAYS have the long-term advantage and will ALWAYS win in the long run. This means that there is no system that is capable of overcoming the power of statistics and math. If anyone ever tries to sell you or convince you that they’ve figured out a system to beat the odds, they’re lying to you and trying to rip you off.
Roulette games have minimum bets, which will be posted on a placard at the table.  Minimum bets work differently for inside bets (specific numbers) and outside bets (everything else).  For outside bets, any bet you make has to be at least the table minimum.  Inside bets can usually be as small as you like, as long as the total of all your inside bets is the table minimum.  For example, with a table minimum of $5, you could put $5 on #14, or $1 each on #14, #27, #8/9, #28/29/30, and #19/20/22/23.  Remember that you can bet inside or outside if you like; there's no requirement to bet both on a given spin.
On an American wheel, there are 38 spots: numbers 1-36, plus 0 and 00.  Your odds of winning a one-number bet are 37 to 1 (37 ways to lose, 1 way to win).  But if you win, the casino doesn't pay you 37 to 1, they pay you less: 35 to 1.  The difference between the true odds and what they actually pay you is 2/38, or 5.26%.  You can do this same calculation for the other bets, and it comes out the same.
Roulette games have minimum bets, which will be posted on a placard at the table.  Minimum bets work differently for inside bets (specific numbers) and outside bets (everything else).  For outside bets, any bet you make has to be at least the table minimum.  Inside bets can usually be as small as you like, as long as the total of all your inside bets is the table minimum.  For example, with a table minimum of $5, you could put $5 on #14, or $1 each on #14, #27, #8/9, #28/29/30, and #19/20/22/23.  Remember that you can bet inside or outside if you like; there's no requirement to bet both on a given spin. 

It's important to understand that the outcome of the roulette wheel is truly random.  If Black has come up for the last 10 spins in a row, the next spin is not more likely to be Red.  Black and Red are still equally likely. There's an old saying, "The wheel has no memory."  That means it doesn't know what it spun before, and even if it did, the wheel can't select what number comes up out of its own volition.  There's more on this in my article Debunking the Gambler's Fallacy.

Please Note: The Martingale is much like the iceberg that sunk the Titanic. The loss of six to eight hands in a row seems like a real longshot; but the fact is that anyone who has played roulette has seen streaks of red or black, odd or even, or high or low coming up with such frequency many times. Casinos put a cap on how much a person can bet so that such relatively short streaks can sink the Martingale player. 

I do not recommend Broadway Roulette. It seemed like it was going to be a great deal. When in reality, I ended up spending $79 per ticket for four of us. We were in the dead last row of the first balcony and saw "The Prom".  I should have known that what seemed like it was too good to be true...was too good to be true. Broadway Roulette informed me that the face value ticket price was $89. The price on the actual ticket was $57, and I paid $79. I only saved $10 per ticket on a show that I didn't particularly want to see in the first place, and had bad seats. You are better off going to the box office of the shows you really want to see the day of the performance.  But for someone that goes to a lot of shows and doesn't care what they see, or where they sit...maybe Broadway Roulette is for you.
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