A lot of the excitement for me though was just the surprise of not knowing what we were going to see till the day of! I don't see broadway shows that often and don't really keep up with what the big ones are so it's nice to not have to make the choice and just knowing that whatever I get will be great, as all the broadway shows are great! You do get to cross out four shows that you definitely don't want to see though, which is good.
One of the coolest things about playing roulette is that there are tons of different and interesting ways you are able to place your bets. You can keep it simple and pick red or black, or odd or even, and just let the wheel do all of the work. If you’re looking for a little more risk and excitement, you have the options to bet individual numbers, combinations of numbers, or many other options. These options are more challenging to win, but the payouts reward you handsomely. This sort of flexibility makes roulette one of the most versatile and entertaining games offered in live or online casinos.

It’s one thing to learn the rules of roulette, but there are some things that the rulebook can’t teach you. It can’t teach you which strategies offer the best prospect of success. It can’t teach you behaviours that you should avoid at all costs. And it can’t teach you the rookie mistakes that all new players make. We’ve assembled a comprehensive guide packed with roulette tips and tricks. It will give you the lowdown on what to do, what not to do, and things you can legally do to give you that crucial edge over the house – the sort of edge that can make a difference between profit or loss.
Practice playing at a free table before placing actual bets. See if the casino has a free table, purchase one to play at home, or play on one online just to get a feel for the game. This will introduce you to the various bets involved in roulette. You can make several types of wagers on a roulette table, which is basically a 3-column chart that lists the 36 numbers on the wheel. The types of wagers are grouped into 2 categories:[1]
Crossing off only four shows leaves you with a lot of chances to receive a show you've already seen, and it's hard not to feel like the selection process is rigged when you a) don't get to see the wheel actually spin and b) following along on social media shows that a majority of people see the same few shows: Kinky Boots, Waitress, Head Over Heels and The Prom. These are shows that you could easily pick up a discounted ticket to using BroadwayBox or purchasing last-minute on StubHub, if not directly from the box office, where tickets usually start around this price, anyway. For example, weekend tickets to The Prom start at $69, to Kinky Boots, $79, and to Head Over Heels, just $49.

I've seen 6 musicals since December 2017, and I've yet to be disappointed. So far, I've seen: the Band's Visit (Seriously. You need to see this mesmerizing musical), a Bronx Tale (Slightly derivative, but 100% enjoyable), Kinky Boots (I dare you not to have a good time at this one.), Beautiful (gorgeous theatre location), Spongebob Squarepants the Musical (So much fun and that music! Yes, please!), and School of Rock (What I wouldn't have given to see the original cast, but wow! They are still killing it!). I use this service probably way more than I should, but I can't help it! It's honestly the only way I will ever see Broadway.
Please Note: The Martingale is much like the iceberg that sunk the Titanic. The loss of six to eight hands in a row seems like a real longshot; but the fact is that anyone who has played roulette has seen streaks of red or black, odd or even, or high or low coming up with such frequency many times. Casinos put a cap on how much a person can bet so that such relatively short streaks can sink the Martingale player.
On an American wheel, there are 38 spots: numbers 1-36, plus 0 and 00.  Your odds of winning a one-number bet are 37 to 1 (37 ways to lose, 1 way to win).  But if you win, the casino doesn't pay you 37 to 1, they pay you less: 35 to 1.  The difference between the true odds and what they actually pay you is 2/38, or 5.26%.  You can do this same calculation for the other bets, and it comes out the same.
The only way a roulette strategy could be truly effective and a guaranteed winner over the long term of play would be if it was able to eliminate the house edge and put the odds in your favour. There’s no such strategy for roulette. While that may be disappointing, please read on because the information below is the best and most detailed that you’re going to find.
French and some European Roulette tables also utilize what are known as French or called bets. These refer to certain sections of the Roulette table that represented by corresponding numbers and phrases on an ellipse. These are Voisin du zero, Orphelins and Tiers du Cylindre, and are based on a particular section’s proximity to zero. The numbers within the ellipse function in a similar manner. 

I would use a Martingale only on the even-money outside bets at roulette, the odd or even, high or low, red or black. These bets give the player 18 chances to win with 20 chances to lose on the American double-zero wheels and 18 chances to win with 19 chances to lose on the European Roulette (single-zero wheels). Obviously, if you can play the European wheel that is the preferred one as long as the betting ranges fit your bankroll.

On an American wheel, there are 38 spots: numbers 1-36, plus 0 and 00.  Your odds of winning a one-number bet are 37 to 1 (37 ways to lose, 1 way to win).  But if you win, the casino doesn't pay you 37 to 1, they pay you less: 35 to 1.  The difference between the true odds and what they actually pay you is 2/38, or 5.26%.  You can do this same calculation for the other bets, and it comes out the same.
×