One of the most well-known systems when it comes to betting on roulette is the Martingale strategy. It is a very simple doubling up betting system. For example, if you start off by betting £10 on red and it comes in black, double your next bet to £20 on red. You need to keep on doing this until it lands on a red and this will cover your losses. The only thing to think about before embarking on this strategy is whether you have enough money to lose before that first winning spin.
You don't have to make just one kind of bet for each spin, you can make as many as you like, and you win if the ball lands on any of your numbers.  If you're playing at a lively table, players will aggressively throw chips all over the layout—5, 10, 26, street bets, avenue bets bets, and odd and black for good measure—all for the same spin.  People even bet on individual numbers even when those numbers were already covered by another bet (such as a street bet).  If a player bet on #11 and also made a street bet on 10-12, and #11 came up, he'd win both bets.  If #12 came up, he'd win the street bet but lose the bet on #11.  So players who throw a lot of chips around the table usually have a lot of chips coming back to them at the end of each spin in winnings.  This doesn't change the house edge; it's the same whether you make one bet per spin or several.  But you will likely lose money faster the more bets you make, because you're betting more.
I am so mortified I recommended Broadway Roulette to my friends, especially since their first Broadway experience was sullied thanks to these terrible seats. Your first Broadway show with your kids should be a great memory. Please do yourself a favor and book through TKTS or use a BroadwayBox code. My friends and I have learned our lesson and will never book or recommend this company to any tourists again.
This is the most basic bet you can make in the game of roulette. You are betting on one particular number, and you can only win if that number is spun. If you bet that the number 13 is going to come out, you only win if the number 13 is rolled. As you can imagine, this is fairly tough to pull off. For that reason, though, you’ll get paid $35 for every $1 you bet when it hits. This bet is riskier but offers an enticing payoff.
Roulette games have minimum bets, which will be posted on a placard at the table.  Minimum bets work differently for inside bets (specific numbers) and outside bets (everything else).  For outside bets, any bet you make has to be at least the table minimum.  Inside bets can usually be as small as you like, as long as the total of all your inside bets is the table minimum.  For example, with a table minimum of $5, you could put $5 on #14, or $1 each on #14, #27, #8/9, #28/29/30, and #19/20/22/23.  Remember that you can bet inside or outside if you like; there's no requirement to bet both on a given spin.
For example, if you would like to bet that the outcome of the roll will be black, you would place your chips in the space marked for black on the felt. If you would like to bet that the outcome of the roll will be a specific number, you would place your bet right on top of that number on the felt. Want to make multiple bets? No problem. Let’s say you wanted to bet on black and you also wanted to bet on the number 31. You would place one bet onto the black section and then place another bet directly on the number 31.
Every roulette player can also use a different classic strategy that deals with a betting patterns. Most of the systems work for all casino games which involve betting and are aimed at controlling the player's bankroll and structuring the gameplay. Also read about roulette cheating and scamming as the systems that have been used by roulette players for years.

A slightly more complex betting strategy, this system is based on the famous Fibonnaci sequence – 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, and so on, with each number being the sum of the previous two numbers. This sequence of numbers was conceived by the 13th century Italian mathematician Leonardo Pisano Bigollo, who first brought the Arabic numeral system to the west. To apply it to roulette, start your play with a real money online casino bet, and then simply apply this sequence with a matching bet increase every time you lose. Let’s say for example you bet $1. If you lose your bet, next time round you’ll bet $2 – then you’ll go from $2 to $3, $3 to $5, and up the rest of the sequence. Should you win your first bet, you’ll start again at $1. If you win further down the sequence, cross off the last two numbers at the point where you began to win, and start from the next one. The theory underpinning the system is that each lost bet will be recouped by betting the lost amount on the next wager, covering consecutive losses by moving up and down the numerical sequence. While a viable theory, like the Martingale, you could end up blowing your bankroll if you hit a solid losing streak.
Practice playing at a free table before placing actual bets. See if the casino has a free table, purchase one to play at home, or play on one online just to get a feel for the game. This will introduce you to the various bets involved in roulette. You can make several types of wagers on a roulette table, which is basically a 3-column chart that lists the 36 numbers on the wheel. The types of wagers are grouped into 2 categories:[1]
As you’ve seen, the rules of Roulette are really quite simple. Now that you’re caught up with the history and basics of the game, let’s go over betting! Real Money Roulette tables have their own chips, and players are designated different colored chips so the croupier will know who to pay and who to take. Each table also will have a minimum bet posted.
The divisions around the wheel are numbered from 1 to 36 in a seemingly random pattern and alternate red and black. Additionally, there is a green division numbered 0. On American tables only there is a second extra green division marked 00 and it is largely this that makes the American version of Roulette a worse proposition financially than the European game.
Here's another way to look at it:  Let's say you bet $10 on every number, one bet on each of the 38 spots.  So you've just thrown down $380 in bets.  Only one of those numbers will win, and will pay 35 to 1, so you'll get back $360 (the $350 you won plus your original $10 bet on that number).  You bet a total of $380 but you walked away with only $360, so you lost $20.  That $20 you lost represents the house edge of 5.26% ($20 lost divided by the $380 that you bet; $20 ÷ $380 = 5.26%).
One of the coolest things about playing roulette is that there are tons of different and interesting ways you are able to place your bets. You can keep it simple and pick red or black, or odd or even, and just let the wheel do all of the work. If you’re looking for a little more risk and excitement, you have the options to bet individual numbers, combinations of numbers, or many other options. These options are more challenging to win, but the payouts reward you handsomely. This sort of flexibility makes roulette one of the most versatile and entertaining games offered in live or online casinos.
Over the course of time, casinos decided to improve the house edge and since imagination is not their strong suit, the solution was to add another zero. The betting table changed its structure many times and when the game was imported to America, these changes grew numerous. French Roulette has a more traditional layout and offers better odds for players, while adding two special rules for the connoisseurs.

Crossing off only four shows leaves you with a lot of chances to receive a show you've already seen, and it's hard not to feel like the selection process is rigged when you a) don't get to see the wheel actually spin and b) following along on social media shows that a majority of people see the same few shows: Kinky Boots, Waitress, Head Over Heels and The Prom. These are shows that you could easily pick up a discounted ticket to using BroadwayBox or purchasing last-minute on StubHub, if not directly from the box office, where tickets usually start around this price, anyway. For example, weekend tickets to The Prom start at $69, to Kinky Boots, $79, and to Head Over Heels, just $49.
This is not a system for bet selection. It is just a betting progression where you double bet size after losses. Remember the wheel doesn’t care about your bet size. The odds don’t change. All you do with the Martingale is change bet size on different spins. Even when you win, you’ll still be paid an unfair amount. You can do well for a while, but eventually you’ll reach the maximum table bet and losses will rapidly compound.
I wanted to love this service because I love to support any female entrepreneur, however I don't think it is worth the money for someone who sees Broadway shows more often than once or twice per year. This service is perfect for someone who is in town for a day or two and would like to see any show (and doesn't care which one they see), but not for the Broadway enthusiast --- unless you use it so often that a majority of shows are automatically removed for you (Broadway Roulette will never send you to the same show twice, so after you log in again after your first show, it is already stricken from the list and you do not need to remove it again). 

Although roulette is a game of chance you can give yourself a better chance of winning if you follow a strategy when it comes to what you bet on and how much. Newcomers will tend to concentrate on their lucky numbers and although that can work as part of a strategy – or just as a stroke of beginner’s luck – if you want to win more often than not you will have to have a better plan.
As we’ve mentioned several times already, roulette is probably the easiest game in the casino to learn how to play. A roulette table will always consist of a wheel, a small white ball, and a table printed with all of your betting options. You will also have a dealer present live in the casino, or an electronic dealer if you’re playing online. Each game will consist of a round of betting, and then the dealer will spin the wheel, drop in the white ball, and wait to see where it lands. The object of the game is to try to predict with your bets what number the white ball is going to land on. After each spin of the wheel, the game resets completely and starts over with a new round of betting.
Before you start casually throwing down chips and haphazardly betting on every spin of the wheel, take a moment to get acquainted with how roulette works. Whether you’re planning to play online or at a land-based casino, the basic rules governing roulette remain unchanged. With real world play however there’s also casino etiquette to consider. If you want to avoid being mistaken for a newb, knowing the informal rules of roulette is just as important as knowing the formal rules. First do your homework. Then play roulette, with the added confidence that comes from having a deep understanding of how it all works. We’ve assembled a detailed guide to playing roulette that covers all bases. It’ll help you take your roulette game to the next level.
Leonardo of Pisa, also known as Fibonacci, was a famous Italian mathematician who wrote about a specific series of numbers in the early 1200’s. While the series was around over a thousand years before Fibonacci, the series was dubbed the “Fibonacci sequence” in the nineteenth century. Basically, the sequence is characterized by the fact that every number after the first two is the sum of the two preceding ones. So, the Fibonacci go like this: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, etc.
Those of you have gambled in a casino, even only a few times, have probably stumbled on the Martingale system, even if you didn’t know the word Martingale. You might have even figured you invented it. I know I did. It seems this is the very first concept most gamblers have and it is expressed in the following phrase: “I have to win sooner or later, right?” 
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