If you tested 10,000 spins, usually you’ll have approximately an even amount of red and blacks. So it may seem reasonable to assume you could check the previous spins and bet on whichever color spun least. Let’s assume there was no green zero for now. For example, say you checked 1000 previous spins and saw there were 600 reds and 400 blacks. So you then bet on black expecting more blacks to spin because of an “evening out effect”.
One last example:  You're betting on #27 every time, because that's one of your lucky numbers.  We expect it to come up once every 38 spins on average.  Luckily for you, it comes up on the 15th spin, making you a tidy profit.  Should you now start making other bets instead, on the assumption that #27 won't hit again soon because it just hit this time?  No.  You can certainly switch to another number if you want, but that won't improve or worsen your chances.  The chances of #27 coming up on a given spin are the same, whether it just come up on the last spin or not: 1 in 38.  I've seen roulette numbers repeat plenty of times. 

Due to the addition of an extra zero in American Roulette, the house edge is increased to an unfavorable 5.26% compared to its European counterpart. European Roulette has halved house edge due to its use of a single zero, making it 2.7%. If you’re a fan of American Roulette, by all means take a spin; but it’s good especially as a beginner to keep in mind that the house has a greater advantage of taking your money.


Columns don’t contain consecutive numbers – for example, the first column has 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 16, 19, 22, 25, 28, and 31 – and the number of red and black numbers differs between each column, a fact that we’ll cover in a moment. And remember, the 0 and 00 aren’t included in any of the columns because they’re special and too good for all the other numbers.
Here's another way to look at it:  Let's say you bet $10 on every number, one bet on each of the 38 spots.  So you've just thrown down $380 in bets.  Only one of those numbers will win, and will pay 35 to 1, so you'll get back $360 (the $350 you won plus your original $10 bet on that number).  You bet a total of $380 but you walked away with only $360, so you lost $20.  That $20 you lost represents the house edge of 5.26% ($20 lost divided by the $380 that you bet; $20 ÷ $380 = 5.26%).
Keep in mind probability is a trend with no short-term guarantees. The real trick to roulette is to get lucky, then quit while you’re ahead. Every spin has a 1 in 37 (for European) or 1 in 38 (for American) chance of landing in a given pocket. Each spin is an individual trial with its own odds but, the longer you play, the more likely it is that you’ll fall into the probabilities that structure roulette.[9]
In North America and the Caribbean, roulette wheels have a double zero, and all bets (except a direct bet on the selected zero) are lost when either zero turns up. The result is significantly poorer odds for the punter and an increase in the Casino's cut. This is probably why in this region, Roulette is less popular than it is in other parts of the world.
All roulette system reviews are from first-hand experience both from myself and others from the largest and most credible roulette forums (vlsroulette.com, rouletteforum.cc and rouletteforum.net). While it may be disappointing to see almost all systems are completely ineffective, it is in fact the truth. This site also provides you with free roulette tips, information regarding how to win at roulette, free roulette systems & strategies, and various free downloads and resources like online roulette casino bonuses for new accounts. You can also add roulette strategy reviews at www.roulettestrategyreviews.com or you can add one here by contacting me. 

You will either have a positive or negative edge, and waiting for something to happen like a sequence of numbers will not improve your chances of winning. The exception is if the “trigger” is directly related to a sequence of spins caused by physical variables of the wheel and ball. For example, if the trigger was “bet on whatever number that won most in 10,000 spins”, then this is bias analysis. But the “triggers” that have no effect are like “wait for 5 reds in a row then bet black”.
Making a bet is easy:  just place your chip(s) on the number(s), color, or sets you want to bet on.  For most bets it's fairly obvious—you can't miss the Red diamond for Red bets, and things like Even, 1-18, and 1st 12 are written out in plain English.  I've added blue circled letters to the picture below to point out how to make the not-so-obvious bets (the sets of 2-6 numbers). Here are the different bets you can make and the payouts for those bets.
Casinos want to make money and they are absolutely serious in protecting their games against cheats and players who have the ability to beat them. So this is a fact that all players must realize. One can use the methods of advantage-play even in games that are not actually susceptible to such methods. A biased wheel strategy can be fun to play even if the wheel isn’t biased. You’ll use the scoreboard as your personal recording device.
Variations of games very similar to Roulette have been around for hundreds of years, therefore its exact origins are hard to trace. However, the version that we know and love today was devised by a French physicist, inventor and mathematician by the name of Blaise Pascal back in 1655. Of course, a game as seemingly complex as Roulette could only have been invented by a mad scientist – okay, he wasn’t really mad but he was a scientist. Pascal was trying to invent a perpetual motion machine – an experiment that failed in its original endeavor. For the non-science minded, a perpetual motion machine is a device that continues to operate without drawing energy from an outside source. A popular notion in the realm of “science” at the time. Though Pascal failed, he gave the world one of the most popular casino games in existence!
In North America and the Caribbean, roulette wheels have a double zero, and all bets (except a direct bet on the selected zero) are lost when either zero turns up. The result is significantly poorer odds for the punter and an increase in the Casino's cut. This is probably why in this region, Roulette is less popular than it is in other parts of the world.
Now, on Broadway Roulette's website FAQ section, they say "We do not include any partial view seats in our mix". However, my friends got LAST ROW of orchestra. They were not only extremely far from the stage, but worse, whenever King Kong stood up, they could not even see his head because of the extreme mezzanine overhang. My friends ended up paying above average for their tickets but got some of the worst seats in the Broadway Theatre, arguably quite partial in view.
Go with the Fibonacci System for a low-risk, low-reward strategy. In this system, you place wagers only on the roughly 50/50 bets (such as odd/even), and you base your wagers on the Fibonacci numbers. If you lose in the first round, make your next wager the next number in the Fibonacci sequence in the second round. Keep advancing a number in the sequence until you win then, when you do win, go back 2 numbers in the sequence.[13]

Honestly, the woman who helped me was nice, even though she sounded very fake. Said she was going to call me back by a certain time and never did. I had to call for her to tel me that they couldn't switch the show. I got beautiful, I already saw it. It's not good for locals, their options suck and they charge more to cross off more shows. Nice idea, but horribly executed
Hi, how about silverthorne publication, they seem to have different name system of games a few month all the time. for example, they come out with a system called checkmate roullett, iron roulette, attack baccarat, power baccarat, etc. I am on their email list and I got this all the time but I don’t know if they are just selling the system or is their system really work?
On an American wheel, there are 38 spots: numbers 1-36, plus 0 and 00.  Your odds of winning a one-number bet are 37 to 1 (37 ways to lose, 1 way to win).  But if you win, the casino doesn't pay you 37 to 1, they pay you less: 35 to 1.  The difference between the true odds and what they actually pay you is 2/38, or 5.26%.  You can do this same calculation for the other bets, and it comes out the same.
×