Are online casino games (also known as Internet games) safe? Many of the gambling sites are owned by large casino companies or big businesses that are not looking for controversy or quick cash. They are in the games for the long run, just as land-based casinos are. So compared to the Internet world of three decades ago you will find most of these sites to be honest. There are two ways to check the honesty of an Internet online casino site. If the site passes either of the two tests, or both of them, you can have confidence that you are probably getting a fair deal. It can never hurt to check out gambling sites.
A slightly more complex betting strategy, this system is based on the famous Fibonnaci sequence – 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, and so on, with each number being the sum of the previous two numbers. This sequence of numbers was conceived by the 13th century Italian mathematician Leonardo Pisano Bigollo, who first brought the Arabic numeral system to the west. To apply it to roulette, start your play with a real money online casino bet, and then simply apply this sequence with a matching bet increase every time you lose. Let’s say for example you bet $1. If you lose your bet, next time round you’ll bet $2 – then you’ll go from $2 to $3, $3 to $5, and up the rest of the sequence. Should you win your first bet, you’ll start again at $1. If you win further down the sequence, cross off the last two numbers at the point where you began to win, and start from the next one. The theory underpinning the system is that each lost bet will be recouped by betting the lost amount on the next wager, covering consecutive losses by moving up and down the numerical sequence. While a viable theory, like the Martingale, you could end up blowing your bankroll if you hit a solid losing streak.
Some scammers will attempt to convince roulette players that betting trends can actually give them an edge even though the game is random. This section will explain why that can’t happen. Players should understand the bottom line of betting into a random game that has a house edge and that is – the house has the edge! Not too hard an idea to assimilate.
Broadway Roulette is for people who consistently watch Broadway shows and are ok with getting tickets to mediocre shows. I used this service for my husbands birthday and he was not happy. If you want to see a Broadway show my advice is to pay the money you would have paid to Ticketmaster/etc. that way you are not left paying for tickets that are not worth it. When I got my tickets the rate on the ticket was $49pp when you pay Broadway Roulette it's $69pp. We got tickets to Frankie and Johnnie. It wasn't a show we were familiar with and did not enjoy it at all. We are a young couple in our early 30s and this show is for older couples. We didn't get a lot of the references in the show. I wouldn't do this again. I would rather spend the extra $30 and see a show I would enjoy!!

Try your hand at guessing the ball’s bounce. As the ball spins in the rim around the wheel, notice when it moves past a fixed point, such as the wheel's 0 pocket. Try to guess when the ball will slow down, fall from the rim, and start bouncing off of the deflectors that divide the wheel’s pockets. It’s difficult but, with practice, you may be able to guess which section of the wheel the ball will land after it stops bouncing.[10]
Let’s say you decide that you want to place a bet on the number 6 and you want to place a bet on the color red. Sounds like a great bet, right? Wrong. It is physically impossible for you to win both of your bets. If the ball rolls red, you’ll win your red bet, but you can’t win your 6 bet. Why? 6 is a black number. If the ball rolls on the 6, you’ll win your individual number bet, but you’ll lose your color bet, as 6 is always black.
The divisions around the wheel are numbered from 1 to 36 in a seemingly random pattern and alternate red and black. Additionally, there is a green division numbered 0. On American tables only there is a second extra green division marked 00 and it is largely this that makes the American version of Roulette a worse proposition financially than the European game.

The thriving casino industry is well established in the Caribbean, offering some of the best roulette games online and involving many long running and trusted brands. This helps US player as they need to look for offshore casinos due to the restrictions of the Federal UIGEA act and for international players is just creates more options to play roulette online for real money.

So you’re ready to learn how to beat the house at roulette? Unfortunately, in the long run, the house is going to have an advantage, as is the case with all casino gambling. This does not mean you can’t be a winner and also does not mean you can’t employ a few strategies to give yourself a better chance of winning. Our experts present and analyze some of the most popular betting and strategy methods so you can decide if you’d like to employ them or not.

It is important that you cover as many numbers as possible, so make sure that you spread them out so each bet is covering two rows on their own, and not doubling up with another bet. As you will be covering 5 out of the 6 winning possible 6-lines, you stand a high chance of winning. If you win, you will win 20 chips (4 x 5 = 20), so including your winning bet you will now have a total of 24 chips.
Casinos will normally post a maximum and a minimum stake for a roulette table and this is sometimes done for recreational play, too. Typically, for each spin of the wheel, if a player the total amount of a player's inside bets must exceed the minimum stake. The listed maximum stake usually shows only the maximum allowed for a single number "straight up" bet. The maximum stakes for other types of bet increases proportionately e.g. The maximum bet allowed for a pair of numbers is double the maximum straight-up bet, the maximum allowed for a corner bet is 4 times the straight up maximum and so on. So that really the limitation is on the amount that the casino can lose!
Online gambling is largely unregulated in the U.S.  That means the casinos serving U.S. players generally don't answer to anyone.  If you have a problem with a casino (like they won't pay you), then you're usually out of luck.  I can't count how many players have written to ask me for help because they didn't get paid by some other casino.  (Not that I helped them—if a dodgy casino won't pay you then you're on your own.)
Few games in a casino are as intimidating to a beginner as the Roulette table – a sea of numbers, colors, and apparent impossibilities. Isn’t it easier to just go press buttons and watch reels spin on a slots machine instead? Surprisingly, no. While the Roulette table may seem confusing at first glance, in fact it’s a wonderfully simple casino game to understand… once you get the hang of it, of course. The key is to learn how to bet properly.
So now you are going to place your 22 stacks of 4 chips on any of the straight up numbers. Do not double up, make sure you just use 4 chips maximum on any number so you cover as much of the table as possible. Then with the remaining 2 chips, place them on any of the empty numbers (1 chip on each), so if you do hit one of these you can start the process again.
Instead of betting on anything and everything, take the time to learn the different bet types and odds that are available to you. Memorise roulette terms you’re likely to hear when playing at a real casino. Develop a strategy, know the level of risk and reward and calculate the best way to see a return on your investment. That way your enjoyment of the game will grow and so will your credits. There might no such thing as a proven roulette strategy, but there are certainly steps you can take to boost your chances of winning. We’ve put together a comprehensive guide to roulette that will teach you everything you need to know about this classic casino game.

If you’re like most players, your strategy would be to use a trigger, then betting progression. A trigger is simply an event you wait to occur before betting. For example, the trigger may be wait for 3 REDS to spin in a row. Your bet would then be doubling bet size until you win. But again this wont work because the odds haven’t changed, the payouts are the same, and all you’re doing is making difference size bets on independent spins.


This is not a system for bet selection. It is just a betting progression where you double bet size after losses. Remember the wheel doesn’t care about your bet size. The odds don’t change. All you do with the Martingale is change bet size on different spins. Even when you win, you’ll still be paid an unfair amount. You can do well for a while, but eventually you’ll reach the maximum table bet and losses will rapidly compound.


You don't have to make just one kind of bet for each spin, you can make as many as you like, and you win if the ball lands on any of your numbers.  If you're playing at a lively table, players will aggressively throw chips all over the layout—5, 10, 26, street bets, avenue bets bets, and odd and black for good measure—all for the same spin.  People even bet on individual numbers even when those numbers were already covered by another bet (such as a street bet).  If a player bet on #11 and also made a street bet on 10-12, and #11 came up, he'd win both bets.  If #12 came up, he'd win the street bet but lose the bet on #11.  So players who throw a lot of chips around the table usually have a lot of chips coming back to them at the end of each spin in winnings.  This doesn't change the house edge; it's the same whether you make one bet per spin or several.  But you will likely lose money faster the more bets you make, because you're betting more.
These are the bets we recommend for beginners who want to get more comfortable with roulette. (This does not mean they aren’t great bets for seasoned players, as well.) Instead of betting on specific numbers or groups of numbers, you are betting on what we have termed “the characteristics” of the number. This would include betting on the color of the number or on the evenness or oddness of the number. These bets always pay even money and are as simple as they sound. If you bet black and a black number rolls, you win. If you bet even and an even number rolls, you win. It’s that easy!
On an American wheel, there are 38 spots: numbers 1-36, plus 0 and 00.  Your odds of winning a one-number bet are 37 to 1 (37 ways to lose, 1 way to win).  But if you win, the casino doesn't pay you 37 to 1, they pay you less: 35 to 1.  The difference between the true odds and what they actually pay you is 2/38, or 5.26%.  You can do this same calculation for the other bets, and it comes out the same.
Here's another way to look at it:  Let's say you bet $10 on every number, one bet on each of the 38 spots.  So you've just thrown down $380 in bets.  Only one of those numbers will win, and will pay 35 to 1, so you'll get back $360 (the $350 you won plus your original $10 bet on that number).  You bet a total of $380 but you walked away with only $360, so you lost $20.  That $20 you lost represents the house edge of 5.26% ($20 lost divided by the $380 that you bet; $20 ÷ $380 = 5.26%).
Practice playing at a free table before placing actual bets. See if the casino has a free table, purchase one to play at home, or play on one online just to get a feel for the game. This will introduce you to the various bets involved in roulette. You can make several types of wagers on a roulette table, which is basically a 3-column chart that lists the 36 numbers on the wheel. The types of wagers are grouped into 2 categories:[1]
CasinoNewsDaily.com will not be held liable for the loss of money or any damage caused by relying on the information on this site. Playing real money casino games carries high level of financial risk and may cause you financial problems. Before you decide to play with real money you should carefully consider your budget, the legislation in your country and your level of experience. If you have gambling addiction problems we recommend you to visit www.gamcare.org.uk or www.gambleaware.co.uk and ask for help.
Another example is expecting you’ll never see 37 different numbers appear in 37 spins. Firstly, it will happen just as often as any other sequence of 37 spins. So why would you favor one group of 37 numbers over another 37 numbers? There is no difference at all. Each spin is independent and with the same odds. It’s exactly the same as expecting to never see four reds in a row (RRRR). It may occur less often than a mixed sequence like BRRB or RBRB, but the odds of any specific sequence happening are exactly the same. So thinking one sequence is more rare than another is delusion. 

One last example:  You're betting on #27 every time, because that's one of your lucky numbers.  We expect it to come up once every 38 spins on average.  Luckily for you, it comes up on the 15th spin, making you a tidy profit.  Should you now start making other bets instead, on the assumption that #27 won't hit again soon because it just hit this time?  No.  You can certainly switch to another number if you want, but that won't improve or worsen your chances.  The chances of #27 coming up on a given spin are the same, whether it just come up on the last spin or not: 1 in 38.  I've seen roulette numbers repeat plenty of times.
Practice playing at a free table before placing actual bets. See if the casino has a free table, purchase one to play at home, or play on one online just to get a feel for the game. This will introduce you to the various bets involved in roulette. You can make several types of wagers on a roulette table, which is basically a 3-column chart that lists the 36 numbers on the wheel. The types of wagers are grouped into 2 categories:[1]
It's important to understand that the outcome of the roulette wheel is truly random.  If Black has come up for the last 10 spins in a row, the next spin is not more likely to be Red.  Black and Red are still equally likely. There's an old saying, "The wheel has no memory."  That means it doesn't know what it spun before, and even if it did, the wheel can't select what number comes up out of its own volition.  There's more on this in my article Debunking the Gambler's Fallacy.
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