Some French tables will employ rules that generally help out the players. The "La Partage" and "En Prison" rules apply to outside even money bets like odds or even, black or red and low or high; they also apply when the ball lands in the zero slot. They are similar in the sense that players only lose half of their bet, but players cannot leave their bet on the table for another spin with the La Partage rule. If a player loses, they can collect half their bet in the En Prison rule, or leave half their bet on the table for the next spin with the La Partage rule.
Officially, there are three variations of Roulette that exist, American, European and French Roulette. Players may bet on a single or a range of numbers, colors red or black, odd or even, or high (19–36) or low (1–18) numbers. The winning number is thus determined when the ball drops into one of 36 colored and numbered pockets on the wheel or a zero pocket (American roulette utilizes a double zero).
Due to the addition of an extra zero in American Roulette, the house edge is increased to an unfavorable 5.26% compared to its European counterpart. European Roulette has halved house edge due to its use of a single zero, making it 2.7%. If you’re a fan of American Roulette, by all means take a spin; but it’s good especially as a beginner to keep in mind that the house has a greater advantage of taking your money.

Realize your odds. At every roulette table (and at every game in the casino itself), the house always has an edge. All bets at both wheels (French or American) are paid at odds that would be true if only the 36 numbers were on the wheel. Their advantage comes from to 0 -- and the 00 in America.[5]There are theories as to how you can improve your odds, but they don't work. However, there are some variants that change how the favor lies:


Some scammers will attempt to convince roulette players that betting trends can actually give them an edge even though the game is random. This section will explain why that can’t happen. Players should understand the bottom line of betting into a random game that has a house edge and that is – the house has the edge! Not too hard an idea to assimilate.

My take on the Paroli system is to use the three-win method but to start it after the session bankroll has gone up. So the first bet, if won, does not entail an increase in the betting for the second bet. Instead the second bet is the same as the first, $10. If that bet is a winner then the player’s bankroll, $500, is above the minimum. Now with that second win, the third bet entails the player going the full Paroli bore. With any loss, the player goes back to the original $10 bet. 
This betting option is one of the most diverse offered, with several different options. Basically, instead of just betting on one number, you have the option to bet on a group of numbers. This can be as wide of a range as 1-18 or 19-36, or as tight of a range as picking two numbers like 1 and 2. Ranges in between are also available for players to choose.
The purpose of roulette is to try to predict the outcome of where the white ball will land on each spin of the wheel. If we could only try to guess what number that was, the game would be a bit boring, as there would be no variety and it would get way too repetitive. Fortunately, the designers of the game have built in tons of betting options to make the game much more exciting, versatile, and downright fun. Let’s take a look at a few of the different categories of bets you can make.
Keep in mind probability is a trend with no short-term guarantees. The real trick to roulette is to get lucky, then quit while you’re ahead. Every spin has a 1 in 37 (for European) or 1 in 38 (for American) chance of landing in a given pocket. Each spin is an individual trial with its own odds but, the longer you play, the more likely it is that you’ll fall into the probabilities that structure roulette.[9]
Leonardo of Pisa, also known as Fibonacci, was a famous Italian mathematician who wrote about a specific series of numbers in the early 1200’s. While the series was around over a thousand years before Fibonacci, the series was dubbed the “Fibonacci sequence” in the nineteenth century. Basically, the sequence is characterized by the fact that every number after the first two is the sum of the two preceding ones. So, the Fibonacci go like this: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, etc.
Like all betting strategies, in the long run the math is against you. This way of playing (aka "Martingale") will be successful only in the short term. Yes, you will see it work say, 9 times out of 10, but the winnings from your 9 successful session will not cover your losings from the 1 losing session you are bound to come across sooner or later. Casinos always have the edge on your money rather than the other way around. Statistically, this is like selling a lottery ticket. You have a large chance of a small win (the selling price of a losing ticket), but a small chance of a big loss (owing the holder of a winning ticket).
The odds of you winning will always be 50/50. So you have a 50% chance of LOSING $1, and a 50% chance of WINNING $0.50. You can’t just double bet size after losses, because then all you do is increase the amount you risk. Sure you may get lucky and win, but what happens if you lose? You’ll lose big. So there is no escaping the unfair payouts UNLESS you know which side of the coin is more likely to appear. Then you would be changing the odds of winning. And if you won much more often than 50% of the time, then the unfair payout wont matter as much.
First experience using Broadway Roulette because I could not decide which show and they were all so expensive. I let them spin the wheel for me and it was so awesome! We got great seats for Burn This with Keri Russell and Adam Driver. I wasn't that familiar with it and wouldn't have chosen it for myself but it was so amazing!!! And our seats should've cost $30+ more each than what we actually paid. Bravo Broadway Roulette! Thank you so much!
Please Note: The Martingale is much like the iceberg that sunk the Titanic. The loss of six to eight hands in a row seems like a real longshot; but the fact is that anyone who has played roulette has seen streaks of red or black, odd or even, or high or low coming up with such frequency many times. Casinos put a cap on how much a person can bet so that such relatively short streaks can sink the Martingale player.
My goal with this roulette strategy is to keep you away from the devastating loss that the Martingale ultimately entails. Plenty of times on the two spins that you sit out there will be a winning spin – had you bet it. More times there won’t. Remember the casino has that edge on all of those even-money wagers. That fact should always be front and center in your mind. Never think you are playing an even game even on bets called “even-money” bets.  
This strategy is designed to win you money when things are going well for you. It is one of the most popular methods of betting although we now call it a “parley.” Just about every gambler knows what a parley is – and how it can make a good night a great night and a bad night a terrible night. Mr. Paroli, whoever he was, discovered it and applied it to gambling. It’s geared to gaining big wins compared to the systems mentioned before which are geared to protecting you against losses..
Few games in a casino are as intimidating to a beginner as the Roulette table – a sea of numbers, colors, and apparent impossibilities. Isn’t it easier to just go press buttons and watch reels spin on a slots machine instead? Surprisingly, no. While the Roulette table may seem confusing at first glance, in fact it’s a wonderfully simple casino game to understand… once you get the hang of it, of course. The key is to learn how to bet properly.
You don’t have to be a mathematical genius to excel at roulette but it makes sense to memorise the sort of odds you’ll receive for different bets. Although it’s unlikely that a croupier will make a mistake and underpay you, if you don’t know the odds of the bet you’ve placed, how are you supposed to correct them? Even if you’re only playing online roulette, it still pays to familiarise yourself with the odds you’ll receive for betting on different sections of the table. That way you’ll be able to calculate the possible return and can adjust your strategy accordingly. If you don’t know the difference between zero and double-zero roulette for instance, you don’t know how to calculate your odds and you’re just guessing. Don’t guess – calculate. We’ll show you how.
A corner bet pays 8 to 1 and it is made by placing the chip at the crossroads of four numbers, indicating the player’s intention on betting on all adjacent numbers. The five number wager is rarely used, due to the fact that it applies only to American roulette and carries a massive house edge of 7.9% while the return on investment is 6 to 1. The odds are much fairer if you choose the double street wager, as you bet on six numbers and the payout is 5 to 1.
Stick to your profit goal and loss limit. When it comes to roulette and any other gambling game, you should only bet an amount that you know you can afford to lose. Once you've decided how much money you're willing to lose, stick to that amount and don't be tempted to bet any more. Things can get out of hand quickly, especially with a game that goes so fast.[5]
One of the other advantages of playing online roulette is that you can play without leaving the comfort of your own home. You don’t have to deal with the traffic and parking at the casino, the smoky air, or pushy and rude people who are trying to reach over and place their bets. You’re also able to play at your own pace without feeling rushed by the other players or by the dealer. Did we mention that you also don’t have to put pants on if you don’t want to?
Officially, there are three variations of Roulette that exist, American, European and French Roulette. Players may bet on a single or a range of numbers, colors red or black, odd or even, or high (19–36) or low (1–18) numbers. The winning number is thus determined when the ball drops into one of 36 colored and numbered pockets on the wheel or a zero pocket (American roulette utilizes a double zero).
If real wheels isn’t your thing, by far your best option is Betvoyager’s No-zero roulette. Basically the wheel has no house edge, so during the game the casino has no advantage over you. The only catch is when you win, you pay 10% of winnings to the casino. See the image below and you’ll notice there’s no zero on the table. See a detailed review of here.

 One of the most popular Roulette strategies, the Martingale system, is a fairly easy one to learn and replicate. The system itself is named after London casino owner John Henry Martindale, who encouraged players to double their bets after a loss. It works like this: simply place an even money bet, and if you lose, double your bet the next time round. If you win, place the exact same original bet on the next spin. Using this betting strategy will help you keep control of your bankroll, and while you may not win millions, you’ll be able to walk away with a healthy account balance – which most players would call a win in itself.
A slightly more complex betting strategy, this system is based on the famous Fibonnaci sequence – 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, and so on, with each number being the sum of the previous two numbers. This sequence of numbers was conceived by the 13th century Italian mathematician Leonardo Pisano Bigollo, who first brought the Arabic numeral system to the west. To apply it to roulette, start your play with a real money online casino bet, and then simply apply this sequence with a matching bet increase every time you lose. Let’s say for example you bet $1. If you lose your bet, next time round you’ll bet $2 – then you’ll go from $2 to $3, $3 to $5, and up the rest of the sequence. Should you win your first bet, you’ll start again at $1. If you win further down the sequence, cross off the last two numbers at the point where you began to win, and start from the next one. The theory underpinning the system is that each lost bet will be recouped by betting the lost amount on the next wager, covering consecutive losses by moving up and down the numerical sequence. While a viable theory, like the Martingale, you could end up blowing your bankroll if you hit a solid losing streak.
This is the most famous gambling system in the world - for roulette and for just about any type of game. Many people play a Martingale, often thinking they created it, but in reality this method of play has severely hurt those who have played it for any length of time. This section will explain all the details about the traditional Martingale systems, the Straight-Up Martingale and the Grand Martingale. You’ll also learn what we know about the Martingale’s strategy origin.
Some wheels might have deeper pockets for some numbers which can then hold onto the ball more than can shallower pockets, or wheels may be slanted in a way that favors certain sectors. This chapter will discuss how to find a biased wheel and what to do should you find one. This section will explain how to analyze numbers to see if they are really indicating a bias that can be exploited by advantage players. A chart will give a breakdown of what is and is not a strong bias.
French Roulette is almost the same as European Roulette, except that the betting board is laid out in a different manner and there are a few small rules differences. These rules, known as the “La Partage” rule and the “en prison” rule, are optionally used in some casinos. These rules do have a more significant effect on gameplay, so if you are going to a casino that offers this variation, we recommend clicking below for more comprehensive details.
An advantage of playing roulette online is that you can also use the betting site’s offers to good effect. Depending on what site you sign up to as a customer account holder you should be able to get yourself an attractive welcome bonus. This means that you could head straight for the site’s roulette games – and there are bound to be quite a few to choose from – and use your free bets or bonus cash to start off with. You could start winning before you’ve even spent much of your own original money!

One of the most well-known systems when it comes to betting on roulette is the Martingale strategy. It is a very simple doubling up betting system. For example, if you start off by betting £10 on red and it comes in black, double your next bet to £20 on red. You need to keep on doing this until it lands on a red and this will cover your losses. The only thing to think about before embarking on this strategy is whether you have enough money to lose before that first winning spin.

This seems to be a tough one for people to comprehend, for some reason. The real reason is that people probably wish it weren’t the case. Vegas was not built on winners. Casinos will ALWAYS have the long-term advantage and will ALWAYS win in the long run. This means that there is no system that is capable of overcoming the power of statistics and math. If anyone ever tries to sell you or convince you that they’ve figured out a system to beat the odds, they’re lying to you and trying to rip you off.
Another example is expecting you’ll never see 37 different numbers appear in 37 spins. Firstly, it will happen just as often as any other sequence of 37 spins. So why would you favor one group of 37 numbers over another 37 numbers? There is no difference at all. Each spin is independent and with the same odds. It’s exactly the same as expecting to never see four reds in a row (RRRR). It may occur less often than a mixed sequence like BRRB or RBRB, but the odds of any specific sequence happening are exactly the same. So thinking one sequence is more rare than another is delusion.
This betting option is one of the most diverse offered, with several different options. Basically, instead of just betting on one number, you have the option to bet on a group of numbers. This can be as wide of a range as 1-18 or 19-36, or as tight of a range as picking two numbers like 1 and 2. Ranges in between are also available for players to choose.
Know a bit about the D'Alembert strategy. A bit safer than the martingale and reverse martingale strategies, the D'Alembert strategy involves ramping up and down by arithmetic factors instead of geometric factors. That means, instead of doubling your bet when you lose (i.e. martingale), you increase your bet by 1 when you lose using the D'Alembert strategy.[5]
Roulette is one of the world’s favourite casino games for a reason. Deceptively simple and yet hard to master, it’s a game that reveals added layers of complexity the more you study it. In other words, if you think roulette involves little more than watching a little ball bounce its way around a wheel while randomly tossing chips at sections of the table, you don’t understand roulette. Sure, you can play it that way, but discerning players know better than that. Discerning players appreciate that there’s a right way and a wrong way to approach roulette.
A slightly different type of outside bets are those that pay 2-1 as the odds of winning are just 33%. The most popular version is on the Dozens, where players are supposed to bet on the first 12 numbers, the second or the third. The same goes for the Columns bet, with players being also expected to bet on 12 numbers, with the only difference being the distribution on the betting grid. All outside bet are clearly defined on the roulette table with specific places for each bet.
Dating back hundreds of years, roulette is one of the oldest gambling games. While the game is based on chance, strict probabilities are at the core of the game's spinning wheel. There are ways of playing the game wisely and minimizing your losses, but the game is structured to give the house an edge. With that in mind, be cautious about strategies that make unrealistic guarantees. Remember to gamble responsibly, if you're making wagers, and have fun trying your luck on the wheel!
The D’Alembert system was invented by the 18th century French mathematician Jean-Baptiste le Rond d’Alembert and is perhaps the easiest of all Roulette strategies to apply. As a negative progression system, it involves you placing a bet, adding one unit to it if you lose, or removing a unit from it if you win, i.e. raise when you lose, lower when you win. Predicated on the idea of natural equilibrium, the D’Alembert strategy works best when applied to a set of even wins and losses for the same bet – but of course you won’t know what the Roulette wheel has in store for you until you start to play. 

Never feel like you have to leave or have to stay when you’re playing roulette. Because each spin of the wheel is a completely independent and separate game, you can stay for one roll or stay for hours. If you’re on a roll, literally, you can keep playing and try to put together a big winning session. If things aren’t quite going your way, you’re under no obligation to stay past one roll. This sort of flexibility also allows you to get in a quick session if you need a rush but don’t have a lot of time.


Try your hand at guessing the ball’s bounce. As the ball spins in the rim around the wheel, notice when it moves past a fixed point, such as the wheel's 0 pocket. Try to guess when the ball will slow down, fall from the rim, and start bouncing off of the deflectors that divide the wheel’s pockets. It’s difficult but, with practice, you may be able to guess which section of the wheel the ball will land after it stops bouncing.[10]
Roulette Computers – These are cheating devices that, realistically, can only be used in real casinos. Without doubt, the use of an effective computer is the best and easiest way to win at roulette, but finding such a device is difficult. Then there’s the fact that in many countries and jurisdictions, they’re illegal and you will end up in jail for using one, so for this reason, we can’t recommend them.
You don't have to make just one kind of bet for each spin, you can make as many as you like, and you win if the ball lands on any of your numbers.  If you're playing at a lively table, players will aggressively throw chips all over the layout—5, 10, 26, street bets, avenue bets bets, and odd and black for good measure—all for the same spin.  People even bet on individual numbers even when those numbers were already covered by another bet (such as a street bet).  If a player bet on #11 and also made a street bet on 10-12, and #11 came up, he'd win both bets.  If #12 came up, he'd win the street bet but lose the bet on #11.  So players who throw a lot of chips around the table usually have a lot of chips coming back to them at the end of each spin in winnings.  This doesn't change the house edge; it's the same whether you make one bet per spin or several.  But you will likely lose money faster the more bets you make, because you're betting more.
The first time I tried Broadway Roulette we received tickets to Beautiful. Our tickets were in the back of the orchestra which I wasn't thrilled about, given that the theatre was mostly sort of empty, and that ticket prices at the box office started around what we'd paid for using the service. Similarly, my second experience garnered tickets to The Prom, which I loved, however the seats were in the mezzanine and, when all is said and done after the fees, the ticket price was very close to (if not more) the starting price for tickets to see that show in the same section.
More than you’ll ever play. Somewhere between 100 to 500 or even more. Most of them use the same few wheels and live video footage provided by another company. So you can often play on the same wheel, but through a different online casino. The casino pays the live-video-provider a fee, but the casino itself is responsible for paying winnings. Although there are hundreds of live roulette casinos online, there are only about 30 different wheels.
Here's another example: Since there are 38 slots on the wheel, we expect any given number to hit 1 out of 38 spins on average.  Now let's say you've been playing Roulette for a few hours, betting on Red every time, and you've been keeping track of what numbers have hit.  There have been 152 spins (4 x 38), and so we expect that each number should have come up 4 times on average.  You note, with some surprise, that #14 hasn't come up at all.  Does this mean that #14 is "due" and that you should bet on #14?  No.  Number 14 is not "due", no number is ever "due".  The wheel has no memory.
Know a bit about the Fibonacci strategy. Leonardo Pisano Bigollo, also known as Fibonacci, was a famous Italian mathematician who discovered an interesting sequence of numbers which are now named after him. The sequence goes as follows, with numbers generated by adding the last two digits together: 1 - 1 - 2 - 3 - 5 - 8 - 13 - 21 - 34 - 55 - 89 - 144 - 233 - 377 - 610.[7]
World Best Roulette System – A convincing website that tells readers what they want to hear but in the end, we have no problem in labeling worldbestroulettesystem.com as a fraud because it has absolutely no chance of winning real money – even though it wins every time in fun mode. If you only take one piece of advice on this website it would be to avoid this system.
I've seen 6 musicals since December 2017, and I've yet to be disappointed. So far, I've seen: the Band's Visit (Seriously. You need to see this mesmerizing musical), a Bronx Tale (Slightly derivative, but 100% enjoyable), Kinky Boots (I dare you not to have a good time at this one.), Beautiful (gorgeous theatre location), Spongebob Squarepants the Musical (So much fun and that music! Yes, please!), and School of Rock (What I wouldn't have given to see the original cast, but wow! They are still killing it!). I use this service probably way more than I should, but I can't help it! It's honestly the only way I will ever see Broadway.
Assuming that the possible bets are all understood, Roulette is essentially a trivially simple game to play. For each turn, once all bets have been placed using coloured chips to distinguish each player, the croupier halts betting, spins the wheel, and rolls the ball in the opposite direction. When the ball comes to a halt in one of the slots, the croupier announces the result, collects all losing bets and pays out the winner's profits.
First experience using Broadway Roulette because I could not decide which show and they were all so expensive. I let them spin the wheel for me and it was so awesome! We got great seats for Burn This with Keri Russell and Adam Driver. I wasn't that familiar with it and wouldn't have chosen it for myself but it was so amazing!!! And our seats should've cost $30+ more each than what we actually paid. Bravo Broadway Roulette! Thank you so much!

The first time I tried Broadway Roulette we received tickets to Beautiful. Our tickets were in the back of the orchestra which I wasn't thrilled about, given that the theatre was mostly sort of empty, and that ticket prices at the box office started around what we'd paid for using the service. Similarly, my second experience garnered tickets to The Prom, which I loved, however the seats were in the mezzanine and, when all is said and done after the fees, the ticket price was very close to (if not more) the starting price for tickets to see that show in the same section.

The argument frequently cited in support of this claim is that the numbers on the wheel will add up to 666, so there definitely has to be something unholy going on. You don’t need to a big fan of Goethe and his Faust to fall in love with the game though, but this theory could come in handy when going through a rough streak. It is always better to blame somebody else for your downswings, especially the devil, instead of taking responsibility for erratic gambling behavior.
No other game on the casino floor gives players the chance of close to 50/50 odds on a single bet. With the red/black, evens/odds, or 1-18/19-36 bets, you’re giving yourself the chance of hitting almost half the options on the Roulette wheel – the 0 and 00 aren’t counted – which gives you a pretty nice chance of winning. Granted, that means that the payout ratio is lower (1:1, bet $10 win $10) but by the numbers, it’s one of the safest and best roulette bets you can go with when playing the wheel.
Variations of games very similar to Roulette have been around for hundreds of years, therefore its exact origins are hard to trace. However, the version that we know and love today was devised by a French physicist, inventor and mathematician by the name of Blaise Pascal back in 1655. Of course, a game as seemingly complex as Roulette could only have been invented by a mad scientist – okay, he wasn’t really mad but he was a scientist. Pascal was trying to invent a perpetual motion machine – an experiment that failed in its original endeavor. For the non-science minded, a perpetual motion machine is a device that continues to operate without drawing energy from an outside source. A popular notion in the realm of “science” at the time. Though Pascal failed, he gave the world one of the most popular casino games in existence!
Some French tables will employ rules that generally help out the players. The "La Partage" and "En Prison" rules apply to outside even money bets like odds or even, black or red and low or high; they also apply when the ball lands in the zero slot. They are similar in the sense that players only lose half of their bet, but players cannot leave their bet on the table for another spin with the La Partage rule. If a player loses, they can collect half their bet in the En Prison rule, or leave half their bet on the table for the next spin with the La Partage rule.
Like all betting strategies, in the long run the math is against you. This way of playing (aka "Martingale") will be successful only in the short term. Yes, you will see it work say, 9 times out of 10, but the winnings from your 9 successful session will not cover your losings from the 1 losing session you are bound to come across sooner or later. Casinos always have the edge on your money rather than the other way around. Statistically, this is like selling a lottery ticket. You have a large chance of a small win (the selling price of a losing ticket), but a small chance of a big loss (owing the holder of a winning ticket).
Assuming that the possible bets are all understood, Roulette is essentially a trivially simple game to play. For each turn, once all bets have been placed using coloured chips to distinguish each player, the croupier halts betting, spins the wheel, and rolls the ball in the opposite direction. When the ball comes to a halt in one of the slots, the croupier announces the result, collects all losing bets and pays out the winner's profits.
Those of you have gambled in a casino, even only a few times, have probably stumbled on the Martingale system, even if you didn’t know the word Martingale. You might have even figured you invented it. I know I did. It seems this is the very first concept most gamblers have and it is expressed in the following phrase: “I have to win sooner or later, right?” 
In addition to the 36 regular numbers, the American roulette wheel features two green slots that have 0 and 00 inscribed on them. They reside at the opposite side of the wheel, as do all consecutive and same color numbers. The distribution of regular numbers is also different from European Roulette, and this is how they go counterclockwise: 0, 2, 14, 35, 23, 4, 16, 33, 21, 6, 18, 31, 19, 8, 12, 29, 25, 10, 27, 00, 1, 13, 36, 24, 3, 15, 34, 22, 5, 17, 32, 20, 7, 11, 30, 26, 9, 28.
Every roulette player can also use a different classic strategy that deals with a betting patterns. Most of the systems work for all casino games which involve betting and are aimed at controlling the player's bankroll and structuring the gameplay. Also read about roulette cheating and scamming as the systems that have been used by roulette players for years.
So you’re ready to learn how to beat the house at roulette? Unfortunately, in the long run, the house is going to have an advantage, as is the case with all casino gambling. This does not mean you can’t be a winner and also does not mean you can’t employ a few strategies to give yourself a better chance of winning. Our experts present and analyze some of the most popular betting and strategy methods so you can decide if you’d like to employ them or not.
As you’ve seen, the rules of Roulette are really quite simple. Now that you’re caught up with the history and basics of the game, let’s go over betting! Real Money Roulette tables have their own chips, and players are designated different colored chips so the croupier will know who to pay and who to take. Each table also will have a minimum bet posted.
Before the game starts, players are instructed to place their bets. This is the time that you get to choose what you would like to wager on for the next spin. We will go over the different bet types and options available to you in depth later. Bets are made by placing your chips onto the felt in the area designated for the bet you would like to make.
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