The game of roulette has rules that are easy to pick up and the best part is that beginners and experienced players have the same chances of winning. In most casino games, practice makes perfect, but when it comes to roulette, all you need is good luck and a solid understanding of the rules. Based on their expectations and bankroll, players can choose an aggressive betting strategy, or settle for smaller potential winnings in exchange for better winning odds.
Why do so many people love to gamble? Is it merely a matter of winning money? There is more to it than just that. The player’s emotions add a lot to the games and perhaps the strongest emotion is the thrill of anticipation. To keep that thrill alive players have to resist the desire to play faster and faster. Slow-play keeps the adrenaline pumping. Fast play puts us into a kind of funk.
Casinos will normally post a maximum and a minimum stake for a roulette table and this is sometimes done for recreational play, too. Typically, for each spin of the wheel, if a player the total amount of a player's inside bets must exceed the minimum stake. The listed maximum stake usually shows only the maximum allowed for a single number "straight up" bet. The maximum stakes for other types of bet increases proportionately e.g. The maximum bet allowed for a pair of numbers is double the maximum straight-up bet, the maximum allowed for a corner bet is 4 times the straight up maximum and so on. So that really the limitation is on the amount that the casino can lose! 

You don’t have to be a mathematical genius to excel at roulette but it makes sense to memorise the sort of odds you’ll receive for different bets. Although it’s unlikely that a croupier will make a mistake and underpay you, if you don’t know the odds of the bet you’ve placed, how are you supposed to correct them? Even if you’re only playing online roulette, it still pays to familiarise yourself with the odds you’ll receive for betting on different sections of the table. That way you’ll be able to calculate the possible return and can adjust your strategy accordingly. If you don’t know the difference between zero and double-zero roulette for instance, you don’t know how to calculate your odds and you’re just guessing. Don’t guess – calculate. We’ll show you how.

Over the course of time, casinos decided to improve the house edge and since imagination is not their strong suit, the solution was to add another zero. The betting table changed its structure many times and when the game was imported to America, these changes grew numerous. French Roulette has a more traditional layout and offers better odds for players, while adding two special rules for the connoisseurs.

Casinos will normally post a maximum and a minimum stake for a roulette table and this is sometimes done for recreational play, too. Typically, for each spin of the wheel, if a player the total amount of a player's inside bets must exceed the minimum stake. The listed maximum stake usually shows only the maximum allowed for a single number "straight up" bet. The maximum stakes for other types of bet increases proportionately e.g. The maximum bet allowed for a pair of numbers is double the maximum straight-up bet, the maximum allowed for a corner bet is 4 times the straight up maximum and so on. So that really the limitation is on the amount that the casino can lose!


The three main versions of roulette are European Roulette, American Roulette, and French Roulette. American Roulette, as you might have guessed, is the version of roulette that is typically played in American casinos. The only real difference between American Roulette and European Roulette is that the American version has a single zero and a double zero, while the European version only has a single zero. This doesn’t affect gameplay at all but does have an effect on some of the payout odds.
Know a bit about the D'Alembert strategy. A bit safer than the martingale and reverse martingale strategies, the D'Alembert strategy involves ramping up and down by arithmetic factors instead of geometric factors. That means, instead of doubling your bet when you lose (i.e. martingale), you increase your bet by 1 when you lose using the D'Alembert strategy.[5]
I would use a Martingale only on the even-money outside bets at roulette, the odd or even, high or low, red or black. These bets give the player 18 chances to win with 20 chances to lose on the American double-zero wheels and 18 chances to win with 19 chances to lose on the European Roulette (single-zero wheels). Obviously, if you can play the European wheel that is the preferred one as long as the betting ranges fit your bankroll.
Bonuses may sound great, but they always come with strings that ultimately benefit the casino. If you are a professional player, never accept a deposit bonus because it will limit what you can do. For example, you may have won a fortune on a wheel, then it gets changed by the casino. But you may not be able to withdraw funds until you have wagered a certain amount. And doing so may erode your profits.

Put another way, imagine waiting many years to see the spin sequence 1,2,3,4,5. It seems really rare, and you bet that #6 wont spin next. But actually the odds of #6 spinning next are the same as any other number.  Run some proper simulations and you’ll see no matter how you play it, you cannot change your odds by betting that rare events wont happen.
Now, on Broadway Roulette's website FAQ section, they say "We do not include any partial view seats in our mix". However, my friends got LAST ROW of orchestra. They were not only extremely far from the stage, but worse, whenever King Kong stood up, they could not even see his head because of the extreme mezzanine overhang. My friends ended up paying above average for their tickets but got some of the worst seats in the Broadway Theatre, arguably quite partial in view.
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