If the ball has landed several times in a given section (say a third) of the wheel, here is how to bet as if the dealer is purposely landing the ball there – or even if he has no purpose at all. A word of caution here – don’t be the kind of player who irritates everyone because he moans, groans and gets angry when he loses. Make sure you show class, win or lose.
CasinoNewsDaily.com will not be held liable for the loss of money or any damage caused by relying on the information on this site. Playing real money casino games carries high level of financial risk and may cause you financial problems. Before you decide to play with real money you should carefully consider your budget, the legislation in your country and your level of experience. If you have gambling addiction problems we recommend you to visit www.gamcare.org.uk or www.gambleaware.co.uk and ask for help.
Roulette gained notoriety amongst the elite gambling circles of Monaco following the lucrative addition, and eventually made its way across the ocean to U.S., where it would undergo yet another transformation. This came in the form of a double zero space added to the Roulette wheel, again creating a higher house edge. Today, Roulette has remained on of the most popular games at casinos, whether online or at brick and mortars throughout Europe and the United States. The hugely simple, yet entertaining format of Roulette as well as promises of massive payouts have continued the game’s longevity. You can discover for yourself by playing European Roulette or American Roulette at Planet 7 Online Casino today!
Realize your odds. At every roulette table (and at every game in the casino itself), the house always has an edge. All bets at both wheels (French or American) are paid at odds that would be true if only the 36 numbers were on the wheel. Their advantage comes from to 0 -- and the 00 in America.[5]There are theories as to how you can improve your odds, but they don't work. However, there are some variants that change how the favor lies:
One of the coolest things about playing roulette is that there are tons of different and interesting ways you are able to place your bets. You can keep it simple and pick red or black, or odd or even, and just let the wheel do all of the work. If you’re looking for a little more risk and excitement, you have the options to bet individual numbers, combinations of numbers, or many other options. These options are more challenging to win, but the payouts reward you handsomely. This sort of flexibility makes roulette one of the most versatile and entertaining games offered in live or online casinos.
Play on European wheels instead of American wheels when possible. The American Roulette wheel has an extra slot, 00, which decreases the odds of winning. One pocket may not seem like a big deal, but the impact on probability is drastic. On an American wheel, the house advantage is twice that of a European wheel, which means you could lose money twice as fast.[8]
Step 2 is very easy. You need to break down your 24 chips in half, so you have two stacks of 12 chips. You then put one of the stacks of 12 on one of the dozens, and the other stack on another of the dozens. So you now have two out of the three dozen’s covered. If the ball lands in one of your dozens you will win 2-1 on your bet, so that will pay you 24 chips, plus the 12 from the winning bet will mean you now have a total of 36 chips.
Officially, there are three variations of Roulette that exist, American, European and French Roulette. Players may bet on a single or a range of numbers, colors red or black, odd or even, or high (19–36) or low (1–18) numbers. The winning number is thus determined when the ball drops into one of 36 colored and numbered pockets on the wheel or a zero pocket (American roulette utilizes a double zero).
Play on European wheels instead of American wheels when possible. The American Roulette wheel has an extra slot, 00, which decreases the odds of winning. One pocket may not seem like a big deal, but the impact on probability is drastic. On an American wheel, the house advantage is twice that of a European wheel, which means you could lose money twice as fast.[8]

If real wheels isn’t your thing, by far your best option is Betvoyager’s No-zero roulette. Basically the wheel has no house edge, so during the game the casino has no advantage over you. The only catch is when you win, you pay 10% of winnings to the casino. See the image below and you’ll notice there’s no zero on the table. See a detailed review of here.
Play through is the number of times you’ll need to wager the bonus amount (or bonus and deposit combined) before you can make a withdrawal. Sometimes you’ll be able to withdraw the bonus itself, though often this will just be the winnings you accumulated while clearing it. 25x is a fair play-through, with anything higher than 40x not so player-friendly.
You can get your chips in different monetary denominations. When you hand the dealer your chips, he or she will ask what denomination you want to designate your chips. If you're at a $5 minimum table, you could make them $1 or you could make them $100 (or anywhere in between). Once you've chosen, they'll place a chip on top of the rail, with a marker on top of that to indicate your colored chips' value.[5]
I do not recommend Broadway Roulette. It seemed like it was going to be a great deal. When in reality, I ended up spending $79 per ticket for four of us. We were in the dead last row of the first balcony and saw "The Prom".  I should have known that what seemed like it was too good to be true...was too good to be true. Broadway Roulette informed me that the face value ticket price was $89. The price on the actual ticket was $57, and I paid $79. I only saved $10 per ticket on a show that I didn't particularly want to see in the first place, and had bad seats. You are better off going to the box office of the shows you really want to see the day of the performance.  But for someone that goes to a lot of shows and doesn't care what they see, or where they sit...maybe Broadway Roulette is for you.
This system is often referred to as the Gambler’s Fallacy. It posits that if events are too tilted in one direction --- say heads appearing 80 percent in the first 10 coin tosses --- then tails must hit more to catch up with it since we are dealing with a 50/50 proposition. Even though this sounds reasonable it is not so as I shall explain in this section.
As you’ve seen, the rules of Roulette are really quite simple. Now that you’re caught up with the history and basics of the game, let’s go over betting! Real Money Roulette tables have their own chips, and players are designated different colored chips so the croupier will know who to pay and who to take. Each table also will have a minimum bet posted.

In most casinos players can continue making bets even while the ball is still spinning.  When the ball is close to dropping, the dealer will wave her hand over the table, which means "No more bets."  When the ball falls into a slot, the dealer will announce the number and the color, and place a marker on the winning number on the layout.  Then she'll scoop up all the losing bets towards the dealer area.  Next, she'll make the payouts by putting the winning chips next to the original bets.  After she's stacked up all the winning chips, she'll remove the marker, and then you can grab any chips you won.  Don't reach for your winnings until the dealer removes the marker, or the dealer will scold you!  New players often have to be told this repeatedly the first time they play because they kept forgetting and because they're excited about collecting their winnings.
This is the most basic bet you can make in the game of roulette. You are betting on one particular number, and you can only win if that number is spun. If you bet that the number 13 is going to come out, you only win if the number 13 is rolled. As you can imagine, this is fairly tough to pull off. For that reason, though, you’ll get paid $35 for every $1 you bet when it hits. This bet is riskier but offers an enticing payoff.
You can get your chips in different monetary denominations. When you hand the dealer your chips, he or she will ask what denomination you want to designate your chips. If you're at a $5 minimum table, you could make them $1 or you could make them $100 (or anywhere in between). Once you've chosen, they'll place a chip on top of the rail, with a marker on top of that to indicate your colored chips' value.[5]
Bonuses may sound great, but they always come with strings that ultimately benefit the casino. If you are a professional player, never accept a deposit bonus because it will limit what you can do. For example, you may have won a fortune on a wheel, then it gets changed by the casino. But you may not be able to withdraw funds until you have wagered a certain amount. And doing so may erode your profits.
Crossing off only four shows leaves you with a lot of chances to receive a show you've already seen, and it's hard not to feel like the selection process is rigged when you a) don't get to see the wheel actually spin and b) following along on social media shows that a majority of people see the same few shows: Kinky Boots, Waitress, Head Over Heels and The Prom. These are shows that you could easily pick up a discounted ticket to using BroadwayBox or purchasing last-minute on StubHub, if not directly from the box office, where tickets usually start around this price, anyway. For example, weekend tickets to The Prom start at $69, to Kinky Boots, $79, and to Head Over Heels, just $49.
As an off-topic point, I was also put-off by a post I read on their website blog about what a theatre goer should and should not wear to the theatre. While the main point of the article was not to wear denim cutoffs to the show, they also bizarrely and randomly listed a number of other things patrons "shouldn't" wear, including vintage jeans, old logo t-shirts (something that, if the writer was actually as trendy as she smugly purported to be, she might know are back in style and can be dressed up quite nicely under a cool jacket or layered necklace) and leggings. For a brand that capitalizes wildly on "making Broadway accessible to everyone," it came off grossly classist and policing of what I can only assume is its target demographic --- young people on a budget.
The three variations of roulette are all extremely similar, with a few small differences. American Roulette is the only version that has a single and a double zero slot on the wheel. This puts the player at a slightly worse disadvantage. European and French Roulette are nearly identical, with only the single zero slot on the wheel. French roulette does have a few slight rule variations that you should scroll up and read about if you happen to be playing somewhere that offers it.

Like all betting strategies, in the long run the math is against you. This way of playing (aka "Martingale") will be successful only in the short term. Yes, you will see it work say, 9 times out of 10, but the winnings from your 9 successful session will not cover your losings from the 1 losing session you are bound to come across sooner or later. Casinos always have the edge on your money rather than the other way around. Statistically, this is like selling a lottery ticket. You have a large chance of a small win (the selling price of a losing ticket), but a small chance of a big loss (owing the holder of a winning ticket).
Even in random games, wild swings can occur. Many of them seem almost impossible but they are not. How many of one color came up the most times in a row? How many of one inside number came up in succession? The events in this section actually happened! And for my wife the Beautiful AP and me, well, we were privy to a wonderfully biased wheel that we took advantage of. You can join our adventure in this section.
First, note that while tickets are billed at just $59 on weekends, after the ticketing fee ($7) and the $10 upgrade to cross off two additional shows (something you'll want to do if you're a person who sees Broadway shows more often than just once in awhile) the ticket is closer to $79, which is what most shows (excluding the hyped productions like Hamilton, Springsteen, Dear Evan Hansen, Book of Mormon, etc.) start at, anyway.

Roulette was probably the first true casino game and was likely introduced in the middle ages. Noblemen attempted to beat roulette with various roulette systems of play. If we had a time machine we could go back and tell them that the systems they invented and used, while fun, just couldn’t give them a true mathematical edge over the casino. Luckily the peasants didn’t play in casinos because, well, after all they were peasants.


Some French tables will employ rules that generally help out the players. The "La Partage" and "En Prison" rules apply to outside even money bets like odds or even, black or red and low or high; they also apply when the ball lands in the zero slot. They are similar in the sense that players only lose half of their bet, but players cannot leave their bet on the table for another spin with the La Partage rule. If a player loses, they can collect half their bet in the En Prison rule, or leave half their bet on the table for the next spin with the La Partage rule.
Broadway Roulette THANK YOU! for a great experience from beginning to end. Excellent communication/customer service. I saw Anastasia on a Wednesday afternoon with my husband and 2 children - receiving the text at 8:30 am with the details! Tickets were at the box office waiting. Rear Orchestra seats for $49! It's really difficult for a family of 4 to be able to frequent Broadway. But not anymore! Will DEFINITELY be spinning the wheel again soon. Job well done! I SO recommend!! :)
Of course, casinos tend to frown on precise measurements and computer simulations by their gamblers, so the researchers developed a simpler method of predicting the outcome of a roulette game that could be deployed without notice. The first step is simply for a player to note the time it takes for the ball to pass a fixed point to get a rough approximation of the velocity of the ball. That approach, according to the researchers, produces results that " although noisy, are feasible" for making predictions.
As an off-topic point, I was also put-off by a post I read on their website blog about what a theatre goer should and should not wear to the theatre. While the main point of the article was not to wear denim cutoffs to the show, they also bizarrely and randomly listed a number of other things patrons "shouldn't" wear, including vintage jeans, old logo t-shirts (something that, if the writer was actually as trendy as she smugly purported to be, she might know are back in style and can be dressed up quite nicely under a cool jacket or layered necklace) and leggings. For a brand that capitalizes wildly on "making Broadway accessible to everyone," it came off grossly classist and policing of what I can only assume is its target demographic --- young people on a budget.
Dear Readers, I have spent many years studying roulette and have tested all the systems covered on this site except the biased wheel systems and the computers. None of the systems I have tested will win long term when played mechanically. Having said that, I do think it is better to use a system rather than just throwing chips on the table. Although, mathematically it probably doesn’t make that much difference. I feel better about my chances when I have a system that I’ve tested and I know what to expect. And that always includes the reality that I will lose on some of my trips. Try to limit your losses and capitalize on your wins. Easier said than done, I know. Maybe even impossible. Never bet more than you can afford to lose and have fun.

Like all betting strategies, in the long run the math is against you. This way of playing (aka "Martingale") will be successful only in the short term. Yes, you will see it work say, 9 times out of 10, but the winnings from your 9 successful session will not cover your losings from the 1 losing session you are bound to come across sooner or later. Casinos always have the edge on your money rather than the other way around. Statistically, this is like selling a lottery ticket. You have a large chance of a small win (the selling price of a losing ticket), but a small chance of a big loss (owing the holder of a winning ticket).
Even with numbers from a random number generator, there will inevitably be times where the same number spins several times in a row. This is simple statistics, and such “freaky streaks” are bound to happen eventually. The odds of 0 spinning three times in a row are 1 in 50653. But what are the odds of 0,0 then 2 spinning? . . . Also 1 in 50653. So ask yourself, why would you bet 0 after it had spun twice consecutively?
Realize your odds. At every roulette table (and at every game in the casino itself), the house always has an edge. All bets at both wheels (French or American) are paid at odds that would be true if only the 36 numbers were on the wheel. Their advantage comes from to 0 -- and the 00 in America.[5]There are theories as to how you can improve your odds, but they don't work. However, there are some variants that change how the favor lies:
So what were some of the most famous systems used by our ancestors in attempting to beat the wheel? Are any of these still used today when people are learning how to play roulette? I can easily answer both of these questions, with the latter first: Yes! the systems of the past are still used today. Why? Because they are fun to play and structure a player’s game-plan in a way that makes sense to the player. A player always knows what to do next when playing a system. There’s no guesswork in how or what to do next.
Instead of betting on anything and everything, take the time to learn the different bet types and odds that are available to you. Memorise roulette terms you’re likely to hear when playing at a real casino. Develop a strategy, know the level of risk and reward and calculate the best way to see a return on your investment. That way your enjoyment of the game will grow and so will your credits. There might no such thing as a proven roulette strategy, but there are certainly steps you can take to boost your chances of winning. We’ve put together a comprehensive guide to roulette that will teach you everything you need to know about this classic casino game.
Here's another way to look at it:  Let's say you bet $10 on every number, one bet on each of the 38 spots.  So you've just thrown down $380 in bets.  Only one of those numbers will win, and will pay 35 to 1, so you'll get back $360 (the $350 you won plus your original $10 bet on that number).  You bet a total of $380 but you walked away with only $360, so you lost $20.  That $20 you lost represents the house edge of 5.26% ($20 lost divided by the $380 that you bet; $20 ÷ $380 = 5.26%).
Few games in a casino are as intimidating to a beginner as the Roulette table – a sea of numbers, colors, and apparent impossibilities. Isn’t it easier to just go press buttons and watch reels spin on a slots machine instead? Surprisingly, no. While the Roulette table may seem confusing at first glance, in fact it’s a wonderfully simple casino game to understand… once you get the hang of it, of course. The key is to learn how to bet properly.
×