No other game on the casino floor gives players the chance of close to 50/50 odds on a single bet. With the red/black, evens/odds, or 1-18/19-36 bets, you’re giving yourself the chance of hitting almost half the options on the Roulette wheel – the 0 and 00 aren’t counted – which gives you a pretty nice chance of winning. Granted, that means that the payout ratio is lower (1:1, bet $10 win $10) but by the numbers, it’s one of the safest and best roulette bets you can go with when playing the wheel.
The “house edge” is what enables the casino to profit. An example is the European wheel has 37 pockets, but a 35-1 payout on single numbers. So if you win 1 in 37 as you’d expect with random bet selection, you’d be paid 35 units plus your original bet, leaving you with 36 units. But if roulette’s payouts were fair, you’d be left with 37 units after the 37 spins. Simply the house edge is unfair payouts. And it affects every bet and every roulette strategy. Even when you win, you are still getting paid unfairly.

Like any gambling strategy, there are some disadvantages to the Martingale. Watch out for that gambler’s fallacy – just because one color has won 100 times in a row doesn’t mean that the other color is more likely to appear on the next spin. Roulette spins have a chance of a little less than 50/50 because of the 0 and 00. In addition, after several consecutive losses you may reach the max bet or run out of money – at this point, you’re in the red whether you win or not. For this roulette winning strategy to work, you need to make larger bets or win in order to recoup losses, and if you can’t do either then you want to walk away.


You’ll also see how the patterns of wins and losses tend to be different between the “inside” bets and the “outside proposition” bets. These betting choices will mean different amounts of session stakes despite the fact that the house has the same edge on both types of bets. Money management when you have the edge is different than managing money when you don’t have the edge. It tends to be the reverse. The more you play, the better the chance you will be ahead. But you must have enough money to do this.
This strategy is designed to win you money when things are going well for you. It is one of the most popular methods of betting although we now call it a “parley.” Just about every gambler knows what a parley is – and how it can make a good night a great night and a bad night a terrible night. Mr. Paroli, whoever he was, discovered it and applied it to gambling. It’s geared to gaining big wins compared to the systems mentioned before which are geared to protecting you against losses..

So what were some of the most famous systems used by our ancestors in attempting to beat the wheel? Are any of these still used today when people are learning how to play roulette? I can easily answer both of these questions, with the latter first: Yes! the systems of the past are still used today. Why? Because they are fun to play and structure a player’s game-plan in a way that makes sense to the player. A player always knows what to do next when playing a system. There’s no guesswork in how or what to do next.
You don’t have to be a mathematical genius to excel at roulette but it makes sense to memorise the sort of odds you’ll receive for different bets. Although it’s unlikely that a croupier will make a mistake and underpay you, if you don’t know the odds of the bet you’ve placed, how are you supposed to correct them? Even if you’re only playing online roulette, it still pays to familiarise yourself with the odds you’ll receive for betting on different sections of the table. That way you’ll be able to calculate the possible return and can adjust your strategy accordingly. If you don’t know the difference between zero and double-zero roulette for instance, you don’t know how to calculate your odds and you’re just guessing. Don’t guess – calculate. We’ll show you how.
This roulette strategy is the equivalent of a YANS and it might even be more wild and crazy than that. It is based upon the assertion that a chaotic betting system can overcome the chaos of randomness. Two wrongs make a right; that kind of thing. Two wrongs don’t make a right and chaos versus chaos is just, well, chaos versus chaos, as you shall see.
French Roulette is almost the same as European Roulette, except that the betting board is laid out in a different manner and there are a few small rules differences. These rules, known as the “La Partage” rule and the “en prison” rule, are optionally used in some casinos. These rules do have a more significant effect on gameplay, so if you are going to a casino that offers this variation, we recommend clicking below for more comprehensive details.
The D’Alembert system was invented by the 18th century French mathematician Jean-Baptiste le Rond d’Alembert and is perhaps the easiest of all Roulette strategies to apply. As a negative progression system, it involves you placing a bet, adding one unit to it if you lose, or removing a unit from it if you win, i.e. raise when you lose, lower when you win. Predicated on the idea of natural equilibrium, the D’Alembert strategy works best when applied to a set of even wins and losses for the same bet – but of course you won’t know what the Roulette wheel has in store for you until you start to play.

The argument frequently cited in support of this claim is that the numbers on the wheel will add up to 666, so there definitely has to be something unholy going on. You don’t need to a big fan of Goethe and his Faust to fall in love with the game though, but this theory could come in handy when going through a rough streak. It is always better to blame somebody else for your downswings, especially the devil, instead of taking responsibility for erratic gambling behavior.
On an American wheel, there are 38 spots: numbers 1-36, plus 0 and 00.  Your odds of winning a one-number bet are 37 to 1 (37 ways to lose, 1 way to win).  But if you win, the casino doesn't pay you 37 to 1, they pay you less: 35 to 1.  The difference between the true odds and what they actually pay you is 2/38, or 5.26%.  You can do this same calculation for the other bets, and it comes out the same.
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