First experience using Broadway Roulette because I could not decide which show and they were all so expensive. I let them spin the wheel for me and it was so awesome! We got great seats for Burn This with Keri Russell and Adam Driver. I wasn't that familiar with it and wouldn't have chosen it for myself but it was so amazing!!! And our seats should've cost $30+ more each than what we actually paid. Bravo Broadway Roulette! Thank you so much!
Thanks. It has upset a lot of scammers who have gone to great lengths to discredit me and the reviews. As perhaps I should have expected it. There are many rubbish reviews about me that are made from competitors, so perhaps its not wise to listen to competitors about each other. So everyone can decide for themselves what they believe. Anyone can just buy a system in question and find out for themselves. You cant really rely on independently reviews alone as it is extremely common that competitors attack each other, usually using fake names on various sites.
If you’re like most players, your strategy would be to use a trigger, then betting progression. A trigger is simply an event you wait to occur before betting. For example, the trigger may be wait for 3 REDS to spin in a row. Your bet would then be doubling bet size until you win. But again this wont work because the odds haven’t changed, the payouts are the same, and all you’re doing is making difference size bets on independent spins.
 One of the most popular Roulette strategies, the Martingale system, is a fairly easy one to learn and replicate. The system itself is named after London casino owner John Henry Martindale, who encouraged players to double their bets after a loss. It works like this: simply place an even money bet, and if you lose, double your bet the next time round. If you win, place the exact same original bet on the next spin. Using this betting strategy will help you keep control of your bankroll, and while you may not win millions, you’ll be able to walk away with a healthy account balance – which most players would call a win in itself.
There are 17 main types of bets in European roulette and one extra bet in American. This extra bet is the Basket bet, which is by far the worse bet one can make and should be avoided. It bets 5 numbers 0, 00, 1, 2, 3 has a winning odds of 5:38 and only pays 6:1, which means a player disadvantage (house edge) of 7,9%, which is extremely unfair compared with the standard 5,3% house edge of all other bets of the American, double zero, roulette or the 2,7% house advantage of the European, single zero, roulette.
Here's another way to look at it:  Let's say you bet $10 on every number, one bet on each of the 38 spots.  So you've just thrown down $380 in bets.  Only one of those numbers will win, and will pay 35 to 1, so you'll get back $360 (the $350 you won plus your original $10 bet on that number).  You bet a total of $380 but you walked away with only $360, so you lost $20.  That $20 you lost represents the house edge of 5.26% ($20 lost divided by the $380 that you bet; $20 ÷ $380 = 5.26%).

Never feel like you have to leave or have to stay when you’re playing roulette. Because each spin of the wheel is a completely independent and separate game, you can stay for one roll or stay for hours. If you’re on a roll, literally, you can keep playing and try to put together a big winning session. If things aren’t quite going your way, you’re under no obligation to stay past one roll. This sort of flexibility also allows you to get in a quick session if you need a rush but don’t have a lot of time.


A lot of the excitement for me though was just the surprise of not knowing what we were going to see till the day of! I don't see broadway shows that often and don't really keep up with what the big ones are so it's nice to not have to make the choice and just knowing that whatever I get will be great, as all the broadway shows are great! You do get to cross out four shows that you definitely don't want to see though, which is good.


I do not recommend Broadway Roulette. It seemed like it was going to be a great deal. When in reality, I ended up spending $79 per ticket for four of us. We were in the dead last row of the first balcony and saw "The Prom".  I should have known that what seemed like it was too good to be true...was too good to be true. Broadway Roulette informed me that the face value ticket price was $89. The price on the actual ticket was $57, and I paid $79. I only saved $10 per ticket on a show that I didn't particularly want to see in the first place, and had bad seats. You are better off going to the box office of the shows you really want to see the day of the performance.  But for someone that goes to a lot of shows and doesn't care what they see, or where they sit...maybe Broadway Roulette is for you.
×