Roulette is a simple game to play as long as the players follow the rules. This section will explain how the game works and what general types of bets can be made. This chapter is the primer for the entire game including the “inside” bets and “ outside proposition” bets; how to buy into a game; the purpose of the scoreboards and why the concept of a Horse’s Ass reflects itself in some workers. I’ll also show you how the numbers around the American and European roulette wheels are ordered in such a way that they do not reflect the betting layout. Then I’ll explain how the casino builds its edge at both the American and European game by using two distinct methods.

Are online casino games (also known as Internet games) safe? Many of the gambling sites are owned by large casino companies or big businesses that are not looking for controversy or quick cash. They are in the games for the long run, just as land-based casinos are. So compared to the Internet world of three decades ago you will find most of these sites to be honest. There are two ways to check the honesty of an Internet online casino site. If the site passes either of the two tests, or both of them, you can have confidence that you are probably getting a fair deal. It can never hurt to check out gambling sites.
Roulette Computers – These are cheating devices that, realistically, can only be used in real casinos. Without doubt, the use of an effective computer is the best and easiest way to win at roulette, but finding such a device is difficult. Then there’s the fact that in many countries and jurisdictions, they’re illegal and you will end up in jail for using one, so for this reason, we can’t recommend them.

So what were some of the most famous systems used by our ancestors in attempting to beat the wheel? Are any of these still used today when people are learning how to play roulette? I can easily answer both of these questions, with the latter first: Yes! the systems of the past are still used today. Why? Because they are fun to play and structure a player’s game-plan in a way that makes sense to the player. A player always knows what to do next when playing a system. There’s no guesswork in how or what to do next.
If we had 100 reds in a row, the chances of red or black spinning next don’t change. To test this principle for yourself, check spin history and find streaks of red or black. Then check how many times red or black spins next. Test enough spins and you’ll find the odds haven’t changed. In this sense, previous spins have no connection to future spins. However, there is still some connection, which is the physical variables. But most players don’t even attempt to utilize the connections.
Fibonacci Roulette System – This is an interesting strategy that uses a slower rate of progression than the Martingale by winning back losses over several winning spins rather than one. It’s possible to have considerably more losing spins but still come out on top, providing of course that you don’t go on an extended losing run over a short space of time.
Dear Readers, I have spent many years studying roulette and have tested all the systems covered on this site except the biased wheel systems and the computers. None of the systems I have tested will win long term when played mechanically. Having said that, I do think it is better to use a system rather than just throwing chips on the table. Although, mathematically it probably doesn’t make that much difference. I feel better about my chances when I have a system that I’ve tested and I know what to expect. And that always includes the reality that I will lose on some of my trips. Try to limit your losses and capitalize on your wins. Easier said than done, I know. Maybe even impossible. Never bet more than you can afford to lose and have fun.
Steer clear of the high-risk Martingale Strategy. For this strategy, you start by wagering the table minimum on a 50/50 outside bet. You keep betting that amount until you lose. When that happens, you double your bet for the next spin and keep doubling your bet until you win. While doubling your bet may help you recover the money you lost, it’s an extremely risky strategy.[15]
My goal with this roulette strategy is to keep you away from the devastating loss that the Martingale ultimately entails. Plenty of times on the two spins that you sit out there will be a winning spin – had you bet it. More times there won’t. Remember the casino has that edge on all of those even-money wagers. That fact should always be front and center in your mind. Never think you are playing an even game even on bets called “even-money” bets.  
It goes without saying that those who play American roulette that features two zeroes will have to deal with a bigger house edge. By contrast, those who prefer French Roulette, which is a version of European Roulette will have better chances to win, due to the “in prison” rule. Basically, if the ball lands on zero, the player doesn’t lose the wager, instead it is locked in for another spin. If the next wager is a winner, the money will be released, if not it goes to the casino’s coffers.

Essentially, Roulette is all about odds, simple physics, and statistics. The word roulette means “little wheel”, and therefore it shouldn’t surprise you that the spinning roulette wheel was invented by a well-known gambler and math wizard. For the next hundred years or so, the early Roulette wheel remained untouched – until Francois and Louis Blanc came upon it. Thanks to their addition of the number zero space on the wheel, the house edge was immediately increased, and turned Roulette into a huge money winner for casinos from then on.


Here's another example: Since there are 38 slots on the wheel, we expect any given number to hit 1 out of 38 spins on average.  Now let's say you've been playing Roulette for a few hours, betting on Red every time, and you've been keeping track of what numbers have hit.  There have been 152 spins (4 x 38), and so we expect that each number should have come up 4 times on average.  You note, with some surprise, that #14 hasn't come up at all.  Does this mean that #14 is "due" and that you should bet on #14?  No.  Number 14 is not "due", no number is ever "due".  The wheel has no memory.
As an off-topic point, I was also put-off by a post I read on their website blog about what a theatre goer should and should not wear to the theatre. While the main point of the article was not to wear denim cutoffs to the show, they also bizarrely and randomly listed a number of other things patrons "shouldn't" wear, including vintage jeans, old logo t-shirts (something that, if the writer was actually as trendy as she smugly purported to be, she might know are back in style and can be dressed up quite nicely under a cool jacket or layered necklace) and leggings. For a brand that capitalizes wildly on "making Broadway accessible to everyone," it came off grossly classist and policing of what I can only assume is its target demographic --- young people on a budget.

For example, if you would like to bet that the outcome of the roll will be black, you would place your chips in the space marked for black on the felt. If you would like to bet that the outcome of the roll will be a specific number, you would place your bet right on top of that number on the felt. Want to make multiple bets? No problem. Let’s say you wanted to bet on black and you also wanted to bet on the number 31. You would place one bet onto the black section and then place another bet directly on the number 31.


If you’re playing at a table live in the casino or online with multiple players, you can imagine that it is important to keep track of whose bets are where. For this reason, casinos will exchange your money for colored chips to keep track of your bets. For example, if there are three players at a table, one player might have red chips, one might have yellow chips, and one might have purple chips. This makes it very easy for you and the dealers to know whose bet belongs to whom.
A slightly different type of outside bets are those that pay 2-1 as the odds of winning are just 33%. The most popular version is on the Dozens, where players are supposed to bet on the first 12 numbers, the second or the third. The same goes for the Columns bet, with players being also expected to bet on 12 numbers, with the only difference being the distribution on the betting grid. All outside bet are clearly defined on the roulette table with specific places for each bet.
Roulette is a simple game to play as long as the players follow the rules. This section will explain how the game works and what general types of bets can be made. This chapter is the primer for the entire game including the “inside” bets and “ outside proposition” bets; how to buy into a game; the purpose of the scoreboards and why the concept of a Horse’s Ass reflects itself in some workers. I’ll also show you how the numbers around the American and European roulette wheels are ordered in such a way that they do not reflect the betting layout. Then I’ll explain how the casino builds its edge at both the American and European game by using two distinct methods.
It may seem unbelievable, but most online casinos have refused payouts at some time. Most of the time, it’s because of “strings attached” to deposit bonuses. This isn’t the casino’s fault – it is the player’s for not reading the terms before accepting a bonus. But often the casino just doesn’t want to pay the winnings and will find any excuse. Some real excuses casinos gave are below:
The D’Alembert system was invented by the 18th century French mathematician Jean-Baptiste le Rond d’Alembert and is perhaps the easiest of all Roulette strategies to apply. As a negative progression system, it involves you placing a bet, adding one unit to it if you lose, or removing a unit from it if you win, i.e. raise when you lose, lower when you win. Predicated on the idea of natural equilibrium, the D’Alembert strategy works best when applied to a set of even wins and losses for the same bet – but of course you won’t know what the Roulette wheel has in store for you until you start to play.

This roulette strategy is the equivalent of a YANS and it might even be more wild and crazy than that. It is based upon the assertion that a chaotic betting system can overcome the chaos of randomness. Two wrongs make a right; that kind of thing. Two wrongs don’t make a right and chaos versus chaos is just, well, chaos versus chaos, as you shall see.
But that didn't stop a group of chaos theorists from trying to beat it anyway. And according to new research published in the journal Chaos, it looks like they may have found a way to beat the house. They were able to model the motion of the wheel and ball and were able to confirm their predictions both in simulation and using an actual roulette wheel.
I do not recommend Broadway Roulette. It seemed like it was going to be a great deal. When in reality, I ended up spending $79 per ticket for four of us. We were in the dead last row of the first balcony and saw "The Prom".  I should have known that what seemed like it was too good to be true...was too good to be true. Broadway Roulette informed me that the face value ticket price was $89. The price on the actual ticket was $57, and I paid $79. I only saved $10 per ticket on a show that I didn't particularly want to see in the first place, and had bad seats. You are better off going to the box office of the shows you really want to see the day of the performance.  But for someone that goes to a lot of shows and doesn't care what they see, or where they sit...maybe Broadway Roulette is for you.
I wanted to love this service because I love to support any female entrepreneur, however I don't think it is worth the money for someone who sees Broadway shows more often than once or twice per year. This service is perfect for someone who is in town for a day or two and would like to see any show (and doesn't care which one they see), but not for the Broadway enthusiast --- unless you use it so often that a majority of shows are automatically removed for you (Broadway Roulette will never send you to the same show twice, so after you log in again after your first show, it is already stricken from the list and you do not need to remove it again).
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