Essentially, Roulette is all about odds, simple physics, and statistics. The word roulette means “little wheel”, and therefore it shouldn’t surprise you that the spinning roulette wheel was invented by a well-known gambler and math wizard. For the next hundred years or so, the early Roulette wheel remained untouched – until Francois and Louis Blanc came upon it. Thanks to their addition of the number zero space on the wheel, the house edge was immediately increased, and turned Roulette into a huge money winner for casinos from then on.
There are countless other losing strategies but you’ll find they are much the same, just repackaged a different way. I don’t mean any disrespect to the creators of these and other losing systems. It’s only my intention to help people understand how to develop a winning strategy. In fact it took me around 10 years of developing roulette systems before I had anything that worked, or even understood the basics of why my systems failed. So I understand the mind of the typical roulette player.
A lot of the excitement for me though was just the surprise of not knowing what we were going to see till the day of! I don't see broadway shows that often and don't really keep up with what the big ones are so it's nice to not have to make the choice and just knowing that whatever I get will be great, as all the broadway shows are great! You do get to cross out four shows that you definitely don't want to see though, which is good.
You don’t have to be a mathematical genius to excel at roulette but it makes sense to memorise the sort of odds you’ll receive for different bets. Although it’s unlikely that a croupier will make a mistake and underpay you, if you don’t know the odds of the bet you’ve placed, how are you supposed to correct them? Even if you’re only playing online roulette, it still pays to familiarise yourself with the odds you’ll receive for betting on different sections of the table. That way you’ll be able to calculate the possible return and can adjust your strategy accordingly. If you don’t know the difference between zero and double-zero roulette for instance, you don’t know how to calculate your odds and you’re just guessing. Don’t guess – calculate. We’ll show you how.

It's important to understand that the outcome of the roulette wheel is truly random.  If Black has come up for the last 10 spins in a row, the next spin is not more likely to be Red.  Black and Red are still equally likely. There's an old saying, "The wheel has no memory."  That means it doesn't know what it spun before, and even if it did, the wheel can't select what number comes up out of its own volition.  There's more on this in my article Debunking the Gambler's Fallacy.
As you might guess, the wider the range, the lesser the payout you will receive. For example, if you chose to bet 1-18 and won, you would get even money on your bet. Subsequently, the tighter your range of numbers, the higher the payout you will receive. If you were to bet the two numbers like in our example, the payout would be 17:1, significantly higher.
Columns don’t contain consecutive numbers – for example, the first column has 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 16, 19, 22, 25, 28, and 31 – and the number of red and black numbers differs between each column, a fact that we’ll cover in a moment. And remember, the 0 and 00 aren’t included in any of the columns because they’re special and too good for all the other numbers.

The divisions around the wheel are numbered from 1 to 36 in a seemingly random pattern and alternate red and black. Additionally, there is a green division numbered 0. On American tables only there is a second extra green division marked 00 and it is largely this that makes the American version of Roulette a worse proposition financially than the European game.
On an American wheel, there are 38 spots: numbers 1-36, plus 0 and 00.  Your odds of winning a one-number bet are 37 to 1 (37 ways to lose, 1 way to win).  But if you win, the casino doesn't pay you 37 to 1, they pay you less: 35 to 1.  The difference between the true odds and what they actually pay you is 2/38, or 5.26%.  You can do this same calculation for the other bets, and it comes out the same.
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