If you want to be the best roulette player you can possibly be then you should have a good grasp of where the game came from – even before there was a game! Roulette hinges on one of the oldest beliefs in the world, the power of the circle. It is hard to determine where roulette actually originated and my introduction will not descend into the obscurity of the issue. Take my advice in this Roulette Guide. Read it all. And we start with the circle and the circle’s impact on our lives and how we actually view reality as a kind of circle.
Even with numbers from a random number generator, there will inevitably be times where the same number spins several times in a row. This is simple statistics, and such “freaky streaks” are bound to happen eventually. The odds of 0 spinning three times in a row are 1 in 50653. But what are the odds of 0,0 then 2 spinning? . . . Also 1 in 50653. So ask yourself, why would you bet 0 after it had spun twice consecutively?
A slightly more complex betting strategy, this system is based on the famous Fibonnaci sequence – 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, and so on, with each number being the sum of the previous two numbers. This sequence of numbers was conceived by the 13th century Italian mathematician Leonardo Pisano Bigollo, who first brought the Arabic numeral system to the west. To apply it to roulette, start your play with a real money online casino bet, and then simply apply this sequence with a matching bet increase every time you lose. Let’s say for example you bet $1. If you lose your bet, next time round you’ll bet $2 – then you’ll go from $2 to $3, $3 to $5, and up the rest of the sequence. Should you win your first bet, you’ll start again at $1. If you win further down the sequence, cross off the last two numbers at the point where you began to win, and start from the next one. The theory underpinning the system is that each lost bet will be recouped by betting the lost amount on the next wager, covering consecutive losses by moving up and down the numerical sequence. While a viable theory, like the Martingale, you could end up blowing your bankroll if you hit a solid losing streak.

Cross-reference roulette system: Cross referencing is a type of analysis where all available data is considered, and used to detect usable patterns. What makes it special is the data cross-referenced to ensure accuracy. This enables the player to better find hidden patterns in spins, and in less time. Also it enables players to quickly adjust when conditions at the wheel change. The method of cross referencing is not exclusive to roulette, and can be applied to other casino games. But this particular roulette system is combined with other predictive methods that are exclusive to roulette.


Making a bet is easy:  just place your chip(s) on the number(s), color, or sets you want to bet on.  For most bets it's fairly obvious—you can't miss the Red diamond for Red bets, and things like Even, 1-18, and 1st 12 are written out in plain English.  I've added blue circled letters to the picture below to point out how to make the not-so-obvious bets (the sets of 2-6 numbers). Here are the different bets you can make and the payouts for those bets.
It goes without saying that those who play American roulette that features two zeroes will have to deal with a bigger house edge. By contrast, those who prefer French Roulette, which is a version of European Roulette will have better chances to win, due to the “in prison” rule. Basically, if the ball lands on zero, the player doesn’t lose the wager, instead it is locked in for another spin. If the next wager is a winner, the money will be released, if not it goes to the casino’s coffers.
The two key areas for Roulette betting is inside and outside. The minimum bet for the table is generally the same for both inside and outside of the table with one difference. Inside bets allow you to spread out the minimum bet over a range of numbers; whereas outside betting requires that a bet be made to equal the minimum. So if the minimum bet is $5, an inside bet must be made that adds up to $5, i.e. multiple chips can placed on the table covering a set of numbers that add up to the minimum. Each outside bet must equal $5.

Roulette Assault – This is from the same person that designed Roulette Sniper. It’s an automated betting software that plays automatically to the settings provided by the user. While it’s unlikely to win any meaningful money over the long term, it is much better than Roulette Sniper and can be used for testing a limited set of systems that it’s coded with.
There are many strategies that aim to win perhaps +1 unit each day. It will hardly cover the cost of car parking. But still let’s use this as an example and say your goal was to win just +1 unit. It seems simple enough, right? Many players have claimed they have a holy grail that will win a set amount per day, but the strategy’s rules require you to leave after winning the target amount.

Leonardo of Pisa, also known as Fibonacci, was a famous Italian mathematician who wrote about a specific series of numbers in the early 1200’s. While the series was around over a thousand years before Fibonacci, the series was dubbed the “Fibonacci sequence” in the nineteenth century. Basically, the sequence is characterized by the fact that every number after the first two is the sum of the two preceding ones. So, the Fibonacci go like this: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, etc.

The most frequently sold roulette system by scammers who claim you can’t lose with it. Henry Labouchere discovered the system and named it after himself. Actually it was created by someone else but Henry didn’t care about that. This is the most famous cancellation betting system strategy and is fun to play. This section will explain how to play it and how not to get (too) hurt by playing it.
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