I am a roulette player. Neither an “editor” nor a “mathematician”. The difference is that I put my money where my mouth is. Most roulette sites are written by editors who have never placed a bet. They recycle knowledge and recite Wikipedia. And they are paid to write. I have paid dearly for every single word I write. I have invested money, time, aspirations and grey matter in roulette.
There are many strategies that aim to win perhaps +1 unit each day. It will hardly cover the cost of car parking. But still let’s use this as an example and say your goal was to win just +1 unit. It seems simple enough, right? Many players have claimed they have a holy grail that will win a set amount per day, but the strategy’s rules require you to leave after winning the target amount.
A slightly different type of outside bets are those that pay 2-1 as the odds of winning are just 33%. The most popular version is on the Dozens, where players are supposed to bet on the first 12 numbers, the second or the third. The same goes for the Columns bet, with players being also expected to bet on 12 numbers, with the only difference being the distribution on the betting grid. All outside bet are clearly defined on the roulette table with specific places for each bet.
If the ball fell into one of the two zero divisions, all lost stakes are taken by the bank but if the bet was matched by virtue of being Pair, Impair, Rouge, Noir, Passe or Manque, instead of being won, the stake was imprisoned until the next spin of the wheel. On that subsequent turn, the stake was either lost or if the ball matched the bet again, the stake was merely returned to the gambler without any profit.

No other game on the casino floor gives players the chance of close to 50/50 odds on a single bet. With the red/black, evens/odds, or 1-18/19-36 bets, you’re giving yourself the chance of hitting almost half the options on the Roulette wheel – the 0 and 00 aren’t counted – which gives you a pretty nice chance of winning. Granted, that means that the payout ratio is lower (1:1, bet $10 win $10) but by the numbers, it’s one of the safest and best roulette bets you can go with when playing the wheel.
Now if you hit a winning number you will win a total of 140 chips (4 x 35 = 140), plus with the 4 chips you have from the winning bet you now have a total of 144 chips, so $144 in this case. This is a good return on your $20 investment! If you are looking for the best Roulette strategy to try now on your online Roulette game, give this one a go….it works very well!
7. Everything in roulette is long term, unless you have detailed data that accounts for why the ball lands where it does (like dominant diamond, rotor speed, ball bounce). You cannot possibly test a system properly from a few minutes or even weeks of play. Proper testing requires months, otherwise a loss or win can be plain good or bad luck. So for proper testing to be practical, you need at least 50,000 recorded spins from a real wheel. The only exception is if you have supporting information to back up results, like dominant diamond, rotor speed, ball bounce (so you can plainly see all factors contributing to where the ball lands).
If you have a good roulette system tester, try creating a system with random bets. You’ll find that even occasionally it will be profitable testing over 20,000 spins. It doesn’t mean the system “works”. It just means you got lucky. Try repeating the test a few times. Certainly there would be many players around using totally ineffective strategies, who have still profited purely from luck. Most players will never play 10,000 spins in their life, and it is still easily possible to profit after 10,000 spins with a losing system from luck. Reality may catch up with them eventually, or they may end their roulette career with a profit despite an ineffective strategy.
On an American wheel, there are 38 spots: numbers 1-36, plus 0 and 00.  Your odds of winning a one-number bet are 37 to 1 (37 ways to lose, 1 way to win).  But if you win, the casino doesn't pay you 37 to 1, they pay you less: 35 to 1.  The difference between the true odds and what they actually pay you is 2/38, or 5.26%.  You can do this same calculation for the other bets, and it comes out the same.

Are online casino games (also known as Internet games) safe? Many of the gambling sites are owned by large casino companies or big businesses that are not looking for controversy or quick cash. They are in the games for the long run, just as land-based casinos are. So compared to the Internet world of three decades ago you will find most of these sites to be honest. There are two ways to check the honesty of an Internet online casino site. If the site passes either of the two tests, or both of them, you can have confidence that you are probably getting a fair deal. It can never hurt to check out gambling sites.


Their business model is setup to keep the business at the forefront of their decision making, rather than the customer. I won tickets to Chicago via their Instagram, which I was grateful for. However, because it was free, they wouldn't cross it off on my account which was quite disappointing. It is probably the least likely show I would want to see twice, so I would would have to cross of Chicago every time I saw a show diminishing the value provided by the company.
The “house edge” is what enables the casino to profit. An example is the European wheel has 37 pockets, but a 35-1 payout on single numbers. So if you win 1 in 37 as you’d expect with random bet selection, you’d be paid 35 units plus your original bet, leaving you with 36 units. But if roulette’s payouts were fair, you’d be left with 37 units after the 37 spins. Simply the house edge is unfair payouts. And it affects every bet and every roulette strategy. Even when you win, you are still getting paid unfairly.

I would use a Martingale only on the even-money outside bets at roulette, the odd or even, high or low, red or black. These bets give the player 18 chances to win with 20 chances to lose on the American double-zero wheels and 18 chances to win with 19 chances to lose on the European Roulette (single-zero wheels). Obviously, if you can play the European wheel that is the preferred one as long as the betting ranges fit your bankroll.
If you say you only need a system to win in “your lifetime of spins”, you aren’t paying attention. Remember there could be 100 players all playing 1,000 spins, which is 100,000 spins in total. From those 100 players, perhaps 47 will be winners, and 53 will be losers. Again most are losers. You have no way of controlling if you are one of the winners or losers. You are all using the same system, and the results depend entirely on whether you get “suitable spins” or not.
If you want to go big but the straight bet gives you the cold sweats, you can still go for a higher reward with a lower risk and choose the split bet instead. This involves placing chips on any two numbers that are next to one another on the felt. This can be either horizontal or vertical placement, and to place the bet you put a chip on the line between the two numbers.
The contribution of roulette towards this is very important. At one extreme you’ll find casinos which exclude roulette games entirely. Others weight the contribution to the play-through at a flat rate, for example, 10%. An alternative approach is to exclude bets which cover a certain amount of the wheel (for example 60% or more) and weight the mid-risk / low-risk bets.
Now with your 72 chips, you need to break them down into 14 stacks of 5 chips. The next bets you are going to cover are the splits, so place your bets on 14 different split bets and make sure that you do not double up on any numbers so you can cover as much of the table as possible. You will have 2 chips left over when you do this, so place these 2 chips straight up on any of the empty numbers as a kind of insurance.
I do not recommend Broadway Roulette. It seemed like it was going to be a great deal. When in reality, I ended up spending $79 per ticket for four of us. We were in the dead last row of the first balcony and saw "The Prom".  I should have known that what seemed like it was too good to be true...was too good to be true. Broadway Roulette informed me that the face value ticket price was $89. The price on the actual ticket was $57, and I paid $79. I only saved $10 per ticket on a show that I didn't particularly want to see in the first place, and had bad seats. You are better off going to the box office of the shows you really want to see the day of the performance.  But for someone that goes to a lot of shows and doesn't care what they see, or where they sit...maybe Broadway Roulette is for you.
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