Despite appearances, the rules of Roulette are actually quite simple. Standard Roulette consists of a spinning wheel, a betting table, a ceramic ball spun by a croupier, and a series of wager options available to each player. Before each round, simply place your wager in chips on the Roulette table, and watch the croupier spin the wheel with the Roulette ball in motion in the opposite direction. Eventually, the ball will slow down and land in a numbered pocket. If the wager you made matches the ball’s final destination, congratulations you are a winner! If not, spin again and see what the tides of fortune have in store for you.

Cross-reference roulette system: Cross referencing is a type of analysis where all available data is considered, and used to detect usable patterns. What makes it special is the data cross-referenced to ensure accuracy. This enables the player to better find hidden patterns in spins, and in less time. Also it enables players to quickly adjust when conditions at the wheel change. The method of cross referencing is not exclusive to roulette, and can be applied to other casino games. But this particular roulette system is combined with other predictive methods that are exclusive to roulette.
Online roulette is great for players who like the convenience and the ability to dictate how their experience goes. With online roulette, you get the ability to play at any time and from anywhere with an internet connection. You never have an issue getting a seat, and you don’t have to worry about reaching the other side of the betting felt, as you place all of your bets with the click of your mouse. 

Making a bet is easy:  just place your chip(s) on the number(s), color, or sets you want to bet on.  For most bets it's fairly obvious—you can't miss the Red diamond for Red bets, and things like Even, 1-18, and 1st 12 are written out in plain English.  I've added blue circled letters to the picture below to point out how to make the not-so-obvious bets (the sets of 2-6 numbers). Here are the different bets you can make and the payouts for those bets.
There are 17 main types of bets in European roulette and one extra bet in American. This extra bet is the Basket bet, which is by far the worse bet one can make and should be avoided. It bets 5 numbers 0, 00, 1, 2, 3 has a winning odds of 5:38 and only pays 6:1, which means a player disadvantage (house edge) of 7,9%, which is extremely unfair compared with the standard 5,3% house edge of all other bets of the American, double zero, roulette or the 2,7% house advantage of the European, single zero, roulette.
Stick to your profit goal and loss limit. When it comes to roulette and any other gambling game, you should only bet an amount that you know you can afford to lose. Once you've decided how much money you're willing to lose, stick to that amount and don't be tempted to bet any more. Things can get out of hand quickly, especially with a game that goes so fast.[5] 

First experience using Broadway Roulette because I could not decide which show and they were all so expensive. I let them spin the wheel for me and it was so awesome! We got great seats for Burn This with Keri Russell and Adam Driver. I wasn't that familiar with it and wouldn't have chosen it for myself but it was so amazing!!! And our seats should've cost $30+ more each than what we actually paid. Bravo Broadway Roulette! Thank you so much!
Casinos will normally post a maximum and a minimum stake for a roulette table and this is sometimes done for recreational play, too. Typically, for each spin of the wheel, if a player the total amount of a player's inside bets must exceed the minimum stake. The listed maximum stake usually shows only the maximum allowed for a single number "straight up" bet. The maximum stakes for other types of bet increases proportionately e.g. The maximum bet allowed for a pair of numbers is double the maximum straight-up bet, the maximum allowed for a corner bet is 4 times the straight up maximum and so on. So that really the limitation is on the amount that the casino can lose!

Few games in a casino are as intimidating to a beginner as the Roulette table – a sea of numbers, colors, and apparent impossibilities. Isn’t it easier to just go press buttons and watch reels spin on a slots machine instead? Surprisingly, no. While the Roulette table may seem confusing at first glance, in fact it’s a wonderfully simple casino game to understand… once you get the hang of it, of course. The key is to learn how to bet properly.


Since there is a single zero slot on the European Roulette, manufacturers don’t need to make sure that it sits at the opposite side of the reel from any number. The rule still applies to same color numbers and consecutive ones, but the sequence is different and it goes like this, clockwise: 26, 3, 35, 12, 28, 7, 29, 18, 22, 9, 31, 14, 20, 1, 33, 16, 24, 5, 10, 23, 8, 30, 11, 36, 13, 27, 6, 34, 17, 25, 2, 21, 4, 19, 15, 32.
A slightly different type of outside bets are those that pay 2-1 as the odds of winning are just 33%. The most popular version is on the Dozens, where players are supposed to bet on the first 12 numbers, the second or the third. The same goes for the Columns bet, with players being also expected to bet on 12 numbers, with the only difference being the distribution on the betting grid. All outside bet are clearly defined on the roulette table with specific places for each bet.
Broadway Roulette THANK YOU! for a great experience from beginning to end. Excellent communication/customer service. I saw Anastasia on a Wednesday afternoon with my husband and 2 children - receiving the text at 8:30 am with the details! Tickets were at the box office waiting. Rear Orchestra seats for $49! It's really difficult for a family of 4 to be able to frequent Broadway. But not anymore! Will DEFINITELY be spinning the wheel again soon. Job well done! I SO recommend!! :)

Over the course of time, casinos decided to improve the house edge and since imagination is not their strong suit, the solution was to add another zero. The betting table changed its structure many times and when the game was imported to America, these changes grew numerous. French Roulette has a more traditional layout and offers better odds for players, while adding two special rules for the connoisseurs.


This betting option is one of the most diverse offered, with several different options. Basically, instead of just betting on one number, you have the option to bet on a group of numbers. This can be as wide of a range as 1-18 or 19-36, or as tight of a range as picking two numbers like 1 and 2. Ranges in between are also available for players to choose.
Here's another way to look at it:  Let's say you bet $10 on every number, one bet on each of the 38 spots.  So you've just thrown down $380 in bets.  Only one of those numbers will win, and will pay 35 to 1, so you'll get back $360 (the $350 you won plus your original $10 bet on that number).  You bet a total of $380 but you walked away with only $360, so you lost $20.  That $20 you lost represents the house edge of 5.26% ($20 lost divided by the $380 that you bet; $20 ÷ $380 = 5.26%).

Whatever your method, there is no absolute winning strategy. The outcome of where the ball will land is a matter of chance, and each roll is a unique occurrence that should be treated as such. Though you may feel inexperienced there is an old say about Roulette, “the wheel has no memory.” Black and red, odd or even, and all bets on the table have the same amount of chance hitting on any given spin. This is huge positive for players new to the game, as Lady Luck could be just around the corner.
The history of the game begins more than 300 years ago, at the end of the 17th century, with Frenchman Blaise Pascal being credited with this invention. Apparently, he was trying to create a perpetual motion machine as he was studying probabilities, but the outcome took him by surprise. The roulette wheel gained a lot of traction relatively quickly and by the end of the century, it was a popular game in Paris.
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