This roulette strategy is the equivalent of a YANS and it might even be more wild and crazy than that. It is based upon the assertion that a chaotic betting system can overcome the chaos of randomness. Two wrongs make a right; that kind of thing. Two wrongs don’t make a right and chaos versus chaos is just, well, chaos versus chaos, as you shall see.
Play on European wheels instead of American wheels when possible. The American Roulette wheel has an extra slot, 00, which decreases the odds of winning. One pocket may not seem like a big deal, but the impact on probability is drastic. On an American wheel, the house advantage is twice that of a European wheel, which means you could lose money twice as fast.[8]
In North America and the Caribbean, roulette wheels have a double zero, and all bets (except a direct bet on the selected zero) are lost when either zero turns up. The result is significantly poorer odds for the punter and an increase in the Casino's cut. This is probably why in this region, Roulette is less popular than it is in other parts of the world.

The first time I tried Broadway Roulette we received tickets to Beautiful. Our tickets were in the back of the orchestra which I wasn't thrilled about, given that the theatre was mostly sort of empty, and that ticket prices at the box office started around what we'd paid for using the service. Similarly, my second experience garnered tickets to The Prom, which I loved, however the seats were in the mezzanine and, when all is said and done after the fees, the ticket price was very close to (if not more) the starting price for tickets to see that show in the same section.
First, note that while tickets are billed at just $59 on weekends, after the ticketing fee ($7) and the $10 upgrade to cross off two additional shows (something you'll want to do if you're a person who sees Broadway shows more often than just once in awhile) the ticket is closer to $79, which is what most shows (excluding the hyped productions like Hamilton, Springsteen, Dear Evan Hansen, Book of Mormon, etc.) start at, anyway.
Stick to your profit goal and loss limit. When it comes to roulette and any other gambling game, you should only bet an amount that you know you can afford to lose. Once you've decided how much money you're willing to lose, stick to that amount and don't be tempted to bet any more. Things can get out of hand quickly, especially with a game that goes so fast.[5]

It’s important to note that you don’t have to guess the number exactly, but you can guess characteristics of the number and still get paid. For example, if you choose to bet that the number rolled will be odd, you will get paid if the number determined by the white ball is odd. It doesn’t matter to you if it’s 13 or 31; you will still get paid on your bet.
I've seen 6 musicals since December 2017, and I've yet to be disappointed. So far, I've seen: the Band's Visit (Seriously. You need to see this mesmerizing musical), a Bronx Tale (Slightly derivative, but 100% enjoyable), Kinky Boots (I dare you not to have a good time at this one.), Beautiful (gorgeous theatre location), Spongebob Squarepants the Musical (So much fun and that music! Yes, please!), and School of Rock (What I wouldn't have given to see the original cast, but wow! They are still killing it!). I use this service probably way more than I should, but I can't help it! It's honestly the only way I will ever see Broadway.
Betting trends properly can reduce exposure to the house edge and increase one’s pleasure at the game. My trend betting strategy will cover how to play trends and enjoy them more! Hey, give these a try: My Hello Red/Black, Odd/Even, and High/Low trend betting. Or my The Counter Trend betting strategy. Or my really conservative trend betting system. And there’s more!
I read an interview that the founder did wherein she said Broadway Roulette prides itself on being all about discovery, i.e funneling people to shows that are new or struggling that the average consumer might not visit on their own. However, someone looking for cheap/random/last-minute Broadway tickets is more likely to see one of those shows due to their low box office cost and sheer availability, so it doesn't seem worthwhile to utilize Broadway Roulette as a service if that's what you're going for. Most of the fun of Broadway Roulette is the gamble --- the chance that you might get a hot show for a low cost --- and yet the service is geared towards those last-minute impulse purchases that a consumer could easily achieve for the same price at a random show's box office if they were so inclined, especially since you don't find out what show you're going to be seeing until that same day.

The history of the game begins more than 300 years ago, at the end of the 17th century, with Frenchman Blaise Pascal being credited with this invention. Apparently, he was trying to create a perpetual motion machine as he was studying probabilities, but the outcome took him by surprise. The roulette wheel gained a lot of traction relatively quickly and by the end of the century, it was a popular game in Paris.

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