Those of you have gambled in a casino, even only a few times, have probably stumbled on the Martingale system, even if you didn’t know the word Martingale. You might have even figured you invented it. I know I did. It seems this is the very first concept most gamblers have and it is expressed in the following phrase: “I have to win sooner or later, right?” 
Like most casino games, there are a few different variations of roulette that you will come across, depending on what part of the world you are in and what type of casino you are playing at. If you’re scared we’re about to complicate this easy-to-learn game, don’t worry; the differences in the variations of these games are extremely small but important enough to point out.
My goal with this roulette strategy is to keep you away from the devastating loss that the Martingale ultimately entails. Plenty of times on the two spins that you sit out there will be a winning spin – had you bet it. More times there won’t. Remember the casino has that edge on all of those even-money wagers. That fact should always be front and center in your mind. Never think you are playing an even game even on bets called “even-money” bets.  
So what were some of the most famous systems used by our ancestors in attempting to beat the wheel? Are any of these still used today when people are learning how to play roulette? I can easily answer both of these questions, with the latter first: Yes! the systems of the past are still used today. Why? Because they are fun to play and structure a player’s game-plan in a way that makes sense to the player. A player always knows what to do next when playing a system. There’s no guesswork in how or what to do next.
Obviously, the biggest disadvantage to this roulette winning strategy has everything to do with timing. The Reverse Martingale Strategy is really risky because as soon as you lose, you lose your entire earnings. Unfortunately, for this one to work really well you need to hit a hot streak and quit before you lose – something that many gamblers aren’t very skilled at doing.
I do not recommend Broadway Roulette. It seemed like it was going to be a great deal. When in reality, I ended up spending $79 per ticket for four of us. We were in the dead last row of the first balcony and saw "The Prom".  I should have known that what seemed like it was too good to be true...was too good to be true. Broadway Roulette informed me that the face value ticket price was $89. The price on the actual ticket was $57, and I paid $79. I only saved $10 per ticket on a show that I didn't particularly want to see in the first place, and had bad seats. You are better off going to the box office of the shows you really want to see the day of the performance.  But for someone that goes to a lot of shows and doesn't care what they see, or where they sit...maybe Broadway Roulette is for you.
So what were some of the most famous systems used by our ancestors in attempting to beat the wheel? Are any of these still used today when people are learning how to play roulette? I can easily answer both of these questions, with the latter first: Yes! the systems of the past are still used today. Why? Because they are fun to play and structure a player’s game-plan in a way that makes sense to the player. A player always knows what to do next when playing a system. There’s no guesswork in how or what to do next.

If the ball has landed several times in a given section (say a third) of the wheel, here is how to bet as if the dealer is purposely landing the ball there – or even if he has no purpose at all. A word of caution here – don’t be the kind of player who irritates everyone because he moans, groans and gets angry when he loses. Make sure you show class, win or lose.
Please Note: The Martingale is much like the iceberg that sunk the Titanic. The loss of six to eight hands in a row seems like a real longshot; but the fact is that anyone who has played roulette has seen streaks of red or black, odd or even, or high or low coming up with such frequency many times. Casinos put a cap on how much a person can bet so that such relatively short streaks can sink the Martingale player.
The only real drawbacks to live roulette deal with logistics and crowdedness. As it is such a popular game, you can expect most tables to be pretty packed most of the time, and especially on peak nights. This can make it challenging to get a seat and can overwhelm some people, as the tables will typically get quite crowded with people reaching over you to make bets.
Make outside bets for better odds of winning. As long as you make the table minimum for each individual bet, you can make multiple outside bets to increase your odds of a payout. For instance, if you wager $1 on even and $1 on black, you’ll win a $2 payout if the ball lands on black 10, and you’ll break even if it lands on red 16. Along with even/odd and red/black, which offer payouts of 1:1, outside bets include:[2]
It's important to understand that the outcome of the roulette wheel is truly random.  If Black has come up for the last 10 spins in a row, the next spin is not more likely to be Red.  Black and Red are still equally likely. There's an old saying, "The wheel has no memory."  That means it doesn't know what it spun before, and even if it did, the wheel can't select what number comes up out of its own volition.  There's more on this in my article Debunking the Gambler's Fallacy.
Another example is expecting you’ll never see 37 different numbers appear in 37 spins. Firstly, it will happen just as often as any other sequence of 37 spins. So why would you favor one group of 37 numbers over another 37 numbers? There is no difference at all. Each spin is independent and with the same odds. It’s exactly the same as expecting to never see four reds in a row (RRRR). It may occur less often than a mixed sequence like BRRB or RBRB, but the odds of any specific sequence happening are exactly the same. So thinking one sequence is more rare than another is delusion. 

First experience using Broadway Roulette because I could not decide which show and they were all so expensive. I let them spin the wheel for me and it was so awesome! We got great seats for Burn This with Keri Russell and Adam Driver. I wasn't that familiar with it and wouldn't have chosen it for myself but it was so amazing!!! And our seats should've cost $30+ more each than what we actually paid. Bravo Broadway Roulette! Thank you so much!
Some wheels might have deeper pockets for some numbers which can then hold onto the ball more than can shallower pockets, or wheels may be slanted in a way that favors certain sectors. This chapter will discuss how to find a biased wheel and what to do should you find one. This section will explain how to analyze numbers to see if they are really indicating a bias that can be exploited by advantage players. A chart will give a breakdown of what is and is not a strong bias.
I used this service for the first time today and it was everything I hoped it would be! They sent an email by 930 am to let me know what show we'd gotten. In the email though they didn't state the time of the show and instead noted it as an "evening" show, which apparently was a glitch. Within half an hour a person, completely unprompted, from the company emailed me to apologize that the show time was missing and they sent a promo code for a small discount for my next purchase. This was totally unnecessary but was very nice of them!

Before the game starts, players are instructed to place their bets. This is the time that you get to choose what you would like to wager on for the next spin. We will go over the different bet types and options available to you in depth later. Bets are made by placing your chips onto the felt in the area designated for the bet you would like to make.
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