This is the most basic bet you can make in the game of roulette. You are betting on one particular number, and you can only win if that number is spun. If you bet that the number 13 is going to come out, you only win if the number 13 is rolled. As you can imagine, this is fairly tough to pull off. For that reason, though, you’ll get paid $35 for every $1 you bet when it hits. This bet is riskier but offers an enticing payoff.
Whether you’ve never played roulette before or you are an experienced player returning to the action, our experts have put together a comprehensive guide to everything you need to know to be a master roulette player at the tables. We’ll cover the basics of how to play the game and expand into some more advanced concepts and explanations to get you ready!
Roulette Computers – These are cheating devices that, realistically, can only be used in real casinos. Without doubt, the use of an effective computer is the best and easiest way to win at roulette, but finding such a device is difficult. Then there’s the fact that in many countries and jurisdictions, they’re illegal and you will end up in jail for using one, so for this reason, we can’t recommend them.
Roulette – in movies, on TV, and in literature, it’s often depicted as glamorous, exciting, and ridiculously lucrative for whichever character is playing. While winning big at the spinning wheel seems like a fantasy reserved for James Bond and other fictional high rollers, it is possible to minimize risk and win big at the same time by knowing the best roulette bets. It all comes down to the numbers, and how you want to play them.
Their business model is setup to keep the business at the forefront of their decision making, rather than the customer. I won tickets to Chicago via their Instagram, which I was grateful for. However, because it was free, they wouldn't cross it off on my account which was quite disappointing. It is probably the least likely show I would want to see twice, so I would would have to cross of Chicago every time I saw a show diminishing the value provided by the company.
I do not recommend Broadway Roulette. It seemed like it was going to be a great deal. When in reality, I ended up spending $79 per ticket for four of us. We were in the dead last row of the first balcony and saw "The Prom".  I should have known that what seemed like it was too good to be true...was too good to be true. Broadway Roulette informed me that the face value ticket price was $89. The price on the actual ticket was $57, and I paid $79. I only saved $10 per ticket on a show that I didn't particularly want to see in the first place, and had bad seats. You are better off going to the box office of the shows you really want to see the day of the performance.  But for someone that goes to a lot of shows and doesn't care what they see, or where they sit...maybe Broadway Roulette is for you.

The three variations of roulette are all extremely similar, with a few small differences. American Roulette is the only version that has a single and a double zero slot on the wheel. This puts the player at a slightly worse disadvantage. European and French Roulette are nearly identical, with only the single zero slot on the wheel. French roulette does have a few slight rule variations that you should scroll up and read about if you happen to be playing somewhere that offers it.
Payouts for this can be surprisingly rewarding if you’re willing to risk more money on each bet. Take Ashley Revell – he once bet $136,000 on a single spin of the Roulette wheel. If throwing down that sum of money on a single bet doesn’t sound impressive or at least make you sweat a little, know that the sum was the entirety of Revell’s life savings and the entire event was televised. So if Revell won, he’d double his money and evoke envy and admiration from his spectators; if he lost, he’d lose everything and earn deserved pity.
Janae Johnson is a staff writer who loves old movies, meeting new people, exploring the great outdoors, and learning with her hands. After graduating from the College of William and Mary, she applied her degree in English to an ever-expanding industry. She has spent years searching for thrills and fulfillment in her work, until she finally found her home at Planet 7.
Officially, there are three variations of Roulette that exist, American, European and French Roulette. Players may bet on a single or a range of numbers, colors red or black, odd or even, or high (19–36) or low (1–18) numbers. The winning number is thus determined when the ball drops into one of 36 colored and numbered pockets on the wheel or a zero pocket (American roulette utilizes a double zero).
Realize your odds. At every roulette table (and at every game in the casino itself), the house always has an edge. All bets at both wheels (French or American) are paid at odds that would be true if only the 36 numbers were on the wheel. Their advantage comes from to 0 -- and the 00 in America.[5]There are theories as to how you can improve your odds, but they don't work. However, there are some variants that change how the favor lies:
If you say you only need a system to win in “your lifetime of spins”, you aren’t paying attention. Remember there could be 100 players all playing 1,000 spins, which is 100,000 spins in total. From those 100 players, perhaps 47 will be winners, and 53 will be losers. Again most are losers. You have no way of controlling if you are one of the winners or losers. You are all using the same system, and the results depend entirely on whether you get “suitable spins” or not.
French Roulette is almost the same as European Roulette, except that the betting board is laid out in a different manner and there are a few small rules differences. These rules, known as the “La Partage” rule and the “en prison” rule, are optionally used in some casinos. These rules do have a more significant effect on gameplay, so if you are going to a casino that offers this variation, we recommend clicking below for more comprehensive details.
×