In other games the color of the chip denotes the denomination, but in Roulette the color denotes only which player the chip belongs to.  Roulette chips can in fact be any denomination—$1, $5, $25, etc.  When you buy in, tell the dealer what denomination you want. He'll put a marker on his stack of chips that are the same color to note how much each of your chips is worth.  Because roulette chips are non-denominational, you can't use them in other table games.  When you're done playing roulette, give your chips to the dealer and she'll exchange them for regular, denominational chips.
Why do so many people love to gamble? Is it merely a matter of winning money? There is more to it than just that. The player’s emotions add a lot to the games and perhaps the strongest emotion is the thrill of anticipation. To keep that thrill alive players have to resist the desire to play faster and faster. Slow-play keeps the adrenaline pumping. Fast play puts us into a kind of funk.
If you want to be the best roulette player you can possibly be then you should have a good grasp of where the game came from – even before there was a game! Roulette hinges on one of the oldest beliefs in the world, the power of the circle. It is hard to determine where roulette actually originated and my introduction will not descend into the obscurity of the issue. Take my advice in this Roulette Guide. Read it all. And we start with the circle and the circle’s impact on our lives and how we actually view reality as a kind of circle.
The D’Alembert system was invented by the 18th century French mathematician Jean-Baptiste le Rond d’Alembert and is perhaps the easiest of all Roulette strategies to apply. As a negative progression system, it involves you placing a bet, adding one unit to it if you lose, or removing a unit from it if you win, i.e. raise when you lose, lower when you win. Predicated on the idea of natural equilibrium, the D’Alembert strategy works best when applied to a set of even wins and losses for the same bet – but of course you won’t know what the Roulette wheel has in store for you until you start to play.

The D’Alembert system was invented by the 18th century French mathematician Jean-Baptiste le Rond d’Alembert and is perhaps the easiest of all Roulette strategies to apply. As a negative progression system, it involves you placing a bet, adding one unit to it if you lose, or removing a unit from it if you win, i.e. raise when you lose, lower when you win. Predicated on the idea of natural equilibrium, the D’Alembert strategy works best when applied to a set of even wins and losses for the same bet – but of course you won’t know what the Roulette wheel has in store for you until you start to play.

Roulette Computers – These are cheating devices that, realistically, can only be used in real casinos. Without doubt, the use of an effective computer is the best and easiest way to win at roulette, but finding such a device is difficult. Then there’s the fact that in many countries and jurisdictions, they’re illegal and you will end up in jail for using one, so for this reason, we can’t recommend them.
First, note that while tickets are billed at just $59 on weekends, after the ticketing fee ($7) and the $10 upgrade to cross off two additional shows (something you'll want to do if you're a person who sees Broadway shows more often than just once in awhile) the ticket is closer to $79, which is what most shows (excluding the hyped productions like Hamilton, Springsteen, Dear Evan Hansen, Book of Mormon, etc.) start at, anyway.
In addition to the 36 regular numbers, the American roulette wheel features two green slots that have 0 and 00 inscribed on them. They reside at the opposite side of the wheel, as do all consecutive and same color numbers. The distribution of regular numbers is also different from European Roulette, and this is how they go counterclockwise: 0, 2, 14, 35, 23, 4, 16, 33, 21, 6, 18, 31, 19, 8, 12, 29, 25, 10, 27, 00, 1, 13, 36, 24, 3, 15, 34, 22, 5, 17, 32, 20, 7, 11, 30, 26, 9, 28.
Like any gambling strategy, there are some disadvantages to the Martingale. Watch out for that gambler’s fallacy – just because one color has won 100 times in a row doesn’t mean that the other color is more likely to appear on the next spin. Roulette spins have a chance of a little less than 50/50 because of the 0 and 00. In addition, after several consecutive losses you may reach the max bet or run out of money – at this point, you’re in the red whether you win or not. For this roulette winning strategy to work, you need to make larger bets or win in order to recoup losses, and if you can’t do either then you want to walk away.
Stick to your profit goal and loss limit. When it comes to roulette and any other gambling game, you should only bet an amount that you know you can afford to lose. Once you've decided how much money you're willing to lose, stick to that amount and don't be tempted to bet any more. Things can get out of hand quickly, especially with a game that goes so fast.[5]
First, note that while tickets are billed at just $59 on weekends, after the ticketing fee ($7) and the $10 upgrade to cross off two additional shows (something you'll want to do if you're a person who sees Broadway shows more often than just once in awhile) the ticket is closer to $79, which is what most shows (excluding the hyped productions like Hamilton, Springsteen, Dear Evan Hansen, Book of Mormon, etc.) start at, anyway.
Here's another way to look at it:  Let's say you bet $10 on every number, one bet on each of the 38 spots.  So you've just thrown down $380 in bets.  Only one of those numbers will win, and will pay 35 to 1, so you'll get back $360 (the $350 you won plus your original $10 bet on that number).  You bet a total of $380 but you walked away with only $360, so you lost $20.  That $20 you lost represents the house edge of 5.26% ($20 lost divided by the $380 that you bet; $20 ÷ $380 = 5.26%).

Casinos will normally post a maximum and a minimum stake for a roulette table and this is sometimes done for recreational play, too. Typically, for each spin of the wheel, if a player the total amount of a player's inside bets must exceed the minimum stake. The listed maximum stake usually shows only the maximum allowed for a single number "straight up" bet. The maximum stakes for other types of bet increases proportionately e.g. The maximum bet allowed for a pair of numbers is double the maximum straight-up bet, the maximum allowed for a corner bet is 4 times the straight up maximum and so on. So that really the limitation is on the amount that the casino can lose!
Most players don’t understand is this is no different to 4 different players making 4 different bets. And the odds of winning and payout are the same regardless. So what has the player changed with progression? Absolutely nothing except the amount they bet. The chances of winning or losing are the same on each spin. So if your system doesn’t win with flat betting (no progression), then it will fail with progression.
There are countless other losing strategies but you’ll find they are much the same, just repackaged a different way. I don’t mean any disrespect to the creators of these and other losing systems. It’s only my intention to help people understand how to develop a winning strategy. In fact it took me around 10 years of developing roulette systems before I had anything that worked, or even understood the basics of why my systems failed. So I understand the mind of the typical roulette player.

The purpose of roulette is to try to predict the outcome of where the white ball will land on each spin of the wheel. If we could only try to guess what number that was, the game would be a bit boring, as there would be no variety and it would get way too repetitive. Fortunately, the designers of the game have built in tons of betting options to make the game much more exciting, versatile, and downright fun. Let’s take a look at a few of the different categories of bets you can make.

Play on European wheels instead of American wheels when possible. The American Roulette wheel has an extra slot, 00, which decreases the odds of winning. One pocket may not seem like a big deal, but the impact on probability is drastic. On an American wheel, the house advantage is twice that of a European wheel, which means you could lose money twice as fast.[8]

Of course, casinos tend to frown on precise measurements and computer simulations by their gamblers, so the researchers developed a simpler method of predicting the outcome of a roulette game that could be deployed without notice. The first step is simply for a player to note the time it takes for the ball to pass a fixed point to get a rough approximation of the velocity of the ball. That approach, according to the researchers, produces results that " although noisy, are feasible" for making predictions.
Since there is a single zero slot on the European Roulette, manufacturers don’t need to make sure that it sits at the opposite side of the reel from any number. The rule still applies to same color numbers and consecutive ones, but the sequence is different and it goes like this, clockwise: 26, 3, 35, 12, 28, 7, 29, 18, 22, 9, 31, 14, 20, 1, 33, 16, 24, 5, 10, 23, 8, 30, 11, 36, 13, 27, 6, 34, 17, 25, 2, 21, 4, 19, 15, 32. 

You will either have a positive or negative edge, and waiting for something to happen like a sequence of numbers will not improve your chances of winning. The exception is if the “trigger” is directly related to a sequence of spins caused by physical variables of the wheel and ball. For example, if the trigger was “bet on whatever number that won most in 10,000 spins”, then this is bias analysis. But the “triggers” that have no effect are like “wait for 5 reds in a row then bet black”.
Now, on Broadway Roulette's website FAQ section, they say "We do not include any partial view seats in our mix". However, my friends got LAST ROW of orchestra. They were not only extremely far from the stage, but worse, whenever King Kong stood up, they could not even see his head because of the extreme mezzanine overhang. My friends ended up paying above average for their tickets but got some of the worst seats in the Broadway Theatre, arguably quite partial in view.
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