First, note that while tickets are billed at just $59 on weekends, after the ticketing fee ($7) and the $10 upgrade to cross off two additional shows (something you'll want to do if you're a person who sees Broadway shows more often than just once in awhile) the ticket is closer to $79, which is what most shows (excluding the hyped productions like Hamilton, Springsteen, Dear Evan Hansen, Book of Mormon, etc.) start at, anyway.
A slightly different type of outside bets are those that pay 2-1 as the odds of winning are just 33%. The most popular version is on the Dozens, where players are supposed to bet on the first 12 numbers, the second or the third. The same goes for the Columns bet, with players being also expected to bet on 12 numbers, with the only difference being the distribution on the betting grid. All outside bet are clearly defined on the roulette table with specific places for each bet.
But don’t get too comfortable here. If the $20 bet loses, the player will double that to $40. If that loses he goes up to $80. If that loses, he goes up to $160. If that loses, he puts up $320. If that loses he goes to $640. If that loses, he might be allowed to go to $1280 but many casinos limit the maximum a player can wager. That $1280 might be too much.
In addition to these roulette rules, there are some that have to do more with etiquette, but even though they are unwritten ones, are just as important. For instance, people who are just watching the game are not allowed to sit at the roulette table seats and the dealer will kindly ask them to step aside. Those who play, are supposed to place their bets as quickly as possible, without interfering with their peers, so that everyone can wager before the dealer calls “no more bets.”
If you care way more about the payout than you do about minimizing risk, your best option is to go with the straight roulette bet. This involves betting on a single number and hoping that Lady Luck is on your side. The risk is extremely high, but the payout – 35:1, $350 for a $10 bet – is pretty freakin’ sweet. Plus, this is the only category that includes the 0 and 00 tiles.

Columns don’t contain consecutive numbers – for example, the first column has 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 16, 19, 22, 25, 28, and 31 – and the number of red and black numbers differs between each column, a fact that we’ll cover in a moment. And remember, the 0 and 00 aren’t included in any of the columns because they’re special and too good for all the other numbers.
In most casinos players can continue making bets even while the ball is still spinning.  When the ball is close to dropping, the dealer will wave her hand over the table, which means "No more bets."  When the ball falls into a slot, the dealer will announce the number and the color, and place a marker on the winning number on the layout.  Then she'll scoop up all the losing bets towards the dealer area.  Next, she'll make the payouts by putting the winning chips next to the original bets.  After she's stacked up all the winning chips, she'll remove the marker, and then you can grab any chips you won.  Don't reach for your winnings until the dealer removes the marker, or the dealer will scold you!  New players often have to be told this repeatedly the first time they play because they kept forgetting and because they're excited about collecting their winnings.
This system is often referred to as the Gambler’s Fallacy. It posits that if events are too tilted in one direction --- say heads appearing 80 percent in the first 10 coin tosses --- then tails must hit more to catch up with it since we are dealing with a 50/50 proposition. Even though this sounds reasonable it is not so as I shall explain in this section.
This betting option is one of the most diverse offered, with several different options. Basically, instead of just betting on one number, you have the option to bet on a group of numbers. This can be as wide of a range as 1-18 or 19-36, or as tight of a range as picking two numbers like 1 and 2. Ranges in between are also available for players to choose.

Payouts for this can be surprisingly rewarding if you’re willing to risk more money on each bet. Take Ashley Revell – he once bet $136,000 on a single spin of the Roulette wheel. If throwing down that sum of money on a single bet doesn’t sound impressive or at least make you sweat a little, know that the sum was the entirety of Revell’s life savings and the entire event was televised. So if Revell won, he’d double his money and evoke envy and admiration from his spectators; if he lost, he’d lose everything and earn deserved pity.


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Due to the addition of an extra zero in American Roulette, the house edge is increased to an unfavorable 5.26% compared to its European counterpart. European Roulette has halved house edge due to its use of a single zero, making it 2.7%. If you’re a fan of American Roulette, by all means take a spin; but it’s good especially as a beginner to keep in mind that the house has a greater advantage of taking your money.

A corner bet pays 8 to 1 and it is made by placing the chip at the crossroads of four numbers, indicating the player’s intention on betting on all adjacent numbers. The five number wager is rarely used, due to the fact that it applies only to American roulette and carries a massive house edge of 7.9% while the return on investment is 6 to 1. The odds are much fairer if you choose the double street wager, as you bet on six numbers and the payout is 5 to 1.
Another example is expecting you’ll never see 37 different numbers appear in 37 spins. Firstly, it will happen just as often as any other sequence of 37 spins. So why would you favor one group of 37 numbers over another 37 numbers? There is no difference at all. Each spin is independent and with the same odds. It’s exactly the same as expecting to never see four reds in a row (RRRR). It may occur less often than a mixed sequence like BRRB or RBRB, but the odds of any specific sequence happening are exactly the same. So thinking one sequence is more rare than another is delusion.
Variations of games very similar to Roulette have been around for hundreds of years, therefore its exact origins are hard to trace. However, the version that we know and love today was devised by a French physicist, inventor and mathematician by the name of Blaise Pascal back in 1655. Of course, a game as seemingly complex as Roulette could only have been invented by a mad scientist – okay, he wasn’t really mad but he was a scientist. Pascal was trying to invent a perpetual motion machine – an experiment that failed in its original endeavor. For the non-science minded, a perpetual motion machine is a device that continues to operate without drawing energy from an outside source. A popular notion in the realm of “science” at the time. Though Pascal failed, he gave the world one of the most popular casino games in existence!
The game of roulette has rules that are easy to pick up and the best part is that beginners and experienced players have the same chances of winning. In most casino games, practice makes perfect, but when it comes to roulette, all you need is good luck and a solid understanding of the rules. Based on their expectations and bankroll, players can choose an aggressive betting strategy, or settle for smaller potential winnings in exchange for better winning odds.

In most casinos players can continue making bets even while the ball is still spinning.  When the ball is close to dropping, the dealer will wave her hand over the table, which means "No more bets."  When the ball falls into a slot, the dealer will announce the number and the color, and place a marker on the winning number on the layout.  Then she'll scoop up all the losing bets towards the dealer area.  Next, she'll make the payouts by putting the winning chips next to the original bets.  After she's stacked up all the winning chips, she'll remove the marker, and then you can grab any chips you won.  Don't reach for your winnings until the dealer removes the marker, or the dealer will scold you!  New players often have to be told this repeatedly the first time they play because they kept forgetting and because they're excited about collecting their winnings.
Broadway Roulette is for people who consistently watch Broadway shows and are ok with getting tickets to mediocre shows. I used this service for my husbands birthday and he was not happy. If you want to see a Broadway show my advice is to pay the money you would have paid to Ticketmaster/etc. that way you are not left paying for tickets that are not worth it. When I got my tickets the rate on the ticket was $49pp when you pay Broadway Roulette it's $69pp. We got tickets to Frankie and Johnnie. It wasn't a show we were familiar with and did not enjoy it at all. We are a young couple in our early 30s and this show is for older couples. We didn't get a lot of the references in the show. I wouldn't do this again. I would rather spend the extra $30 and see a show I would enjoy!!
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