This is the most basic bet you can make in the game of roulette. You are betting on one particular number, and you can only win if that number is spun. If you bet that the number 13 is going to come out, you only win if the number 13 is rolled. As you can imagine, this is fairly tough to pull off. For that reason, though, you’ll get paid $35 for every $1 you bet when it hits. This bet is riskier but offers an enticing payoff.
Variations of games very similar to Roulette have been around for hundreds of years, therefore its exact origins are hard to trace. However, the version that we know and love today was devised by a French physicist, inventor and mathematician by the name of Blaise Pascal back in 1655. Of course, a game as seemingly complex as Roulette could only have been invented by a mad scientist – okay, he wasn’t really mad but he was a scientist. Pascal was trying to invent a perpetual motion machine – an experiment that failed in its original endeavor. For the non-science minded, a perpetual motion machine is a device that continues to operate without drawing energy from an outside source. A popular notion in the realm of “science” at the time. Though Pascal failed, he gave the world one of the most popular casino games in existence!
Although roulette is a game of chance you can give yourself a better chance of winning if you follow a strategy when it comes to what you bet on and how much. Newcomers will tend to concentrate on their lucky numbers and although that can work as part of a strategy – or just as a stroke of beginner’s luck – if you want to win more often than not you will have to have a better plan.
One of the coolest things about playing roulette is that there are tons of different and interesting ways you are able to place your bets. You can keep it simple and pick red or black, or odd or even, and just let the wheel do all of the work. If you’re looking for a little more risk and excitement, you have the options to bet individual numbers, combinations of numbers, or many other options. These options are more challenging to win, but the payouts reward you handsomely. This sort of flexibility makes roulette one of the most versatile and entertaining games offered in live or online casinos. 

Those of you have gambled in a casino, even only a few times, have probably stumbled on the Martingale system, even if you didn’t know the word Martingale. You might have even figured you invented it. I know I did. It seems this is the very first concept most gamblers have and it is expressed in the following phrase: “I have to win sooner or later, right?” 

It’s important to note that you don’t have to guess the number exactly, but you can guess characteristics of the number and still get paid. For example, if you choose to bet that the number rolled will be odd, you will get paid if the number determined by the white ball is odd. It doesn’t matter to you if it’s 13 or 31; you will still get paid on your bet.
A slightly different type of outside bets are those that pay 2-1 as the odds of winning are just 33%. The most popular version is on the Dozens, where players are supposed to bet on the first 12 numbers, the second or the third. The same goes for the Columns bet, with players being also expected to bet on 12 numbers, with the only difference being the distribution on the betting grid. All outside bet are clearly defined on the roulette table with specific places for each bet.
Variations of games very similar to Roulette have been around for hundreds of years, therefore its exact origins are hard to trace. However, the version that we know and love today was devised by a French physicist, inventor and mathematician by the name of Blaise Pascal back in 1655. Of course, a game as seemingly complex as Roulette could only have been invented by a mad scientist – okay, he wasn’t really mad but he was a scientist. Pascal was trying to invent a perpetual motion machine – an experiment that failed in its original endeavor. For the non-science minded, a perpetual motion machine is a device that continues to operate without drawing energy from an outside source. A popular notion in the realm of “science” at the time. Though Pascal failed, he gave the world one of the most popular casino games in existence!
The purpose of roulette is to try to predict the outcome of where the white ball will land on each spin of the wheel. If we could only try to guess what number that was, the game would be a bit boring, as there would be no variety and it would get way too repetitive. Fortunately, the designers of the game have built in tons of betting options to make the game much more exciting, versatile, and downright fun. Let’s take a look at a few of the different categories of bets you can make.

The divisions around the wheel are numbered from 1 to 36 in a seemingly random pattern and alternate red and black. Additionally, there is a green division numbered 0. On American tables only there is a second extra green division marked 00 and it is largely this that makes the American version of Roulette a worse proposition financially than the European game.
Casinos will normally post a maximum and a minimum stake for a roulette table and this is sometimes done for recreational play, too. Typically, for each spin of the wheel, if a player the total amount of a player's inside bets must exceed the minimum stake. The listed maximum stake usually shows only the maximum allowed for a single number "straight up" bet. The maximum stakes for other types of bet increases proportionately e.g. The maximum bet allowed for a pair of numbers is double the maximum straight-up bet, the maximum allowed for a corner bet is 4 times the straight up maximum and so on. So that really the limitation is on the amount that the casino can lose!
Like any gambling strategy, there are some disadvantages to the Martingale. Watch out for that gambler’s fallacy – just because one color has won 100 times in a row doesn’t mean that the other color is more likely to appear on the next spin. Roulette spins have a chance of a little less than 50/50 because of the 0 and 00. In addition, after several consecutive losses you may reach the max bet or run out of money – at this point, you’re in the red whether you win or not. For this roulette winning strategy to work, you need to make larger bets or win in order to recoup losses, and if you can’t do either then you want to walk away.

The first time I tried Broadway Roulette we received tickets to Beautiful. Our tickets were in the back of the orchestra which I wasn't thrilled about, given that the theatre was mostly sort of empty, and that ticket prices at the box office started around what we'd paid for using the service. Similarly, my second experience garnered tickets to The Prom, which I loved, however the seats were in the mezzanine and, when all is said and done after the fees, the ticket price was very close to (if not more) the starting price for tickets to see that show in the same section. 

Crossing off only four shows leaves you with a lot of chances to receive a show you've already seen, and it's hard not to feel like the selection process is rigged when you a) don't get to see the wheel actually spin and b) following along on social media shows that a majority of people see the same few shows: Kinky Boots, Waitress, Head Over Heels and The Prom. These are shows that you could easily pick up a discounted ticket to using BroadwayBox or purchasing last-minute on StubHub, if not directly from the box office, where tickets usually start around this price, anyway. For example, weekend tickets to The Prom start at $69, to Kinky Boots, $79, and to Head Over Heels, just $49.
We got tickets to see The Prom. We paid $70 each with fees and the upgrade to remove two additional selections and ended up getting tickets on the mezzanine. The price on the ticket indicated $61 which I'm going to assume was BR's negotiated price as it appeared the same tickets would have been about $89 if we bought them ourselves. Not sure I would use this service again as I didn't think it represented that significant of a savings given you don't have control of what you are seeing. However if you are open to seeing anything and just want some inexpensive tickets this is a good way to do it.
Roulette is a simple game to play as long as the players follow the rules. This section will explain how the game works and what general types of bets can be made. This chapter is the primer for the entire game including the “inside” bets and “ outside proposition” bets; how to buy into a game; the purpose of the scoreboards and why the concept of a Horse’s Ass reflects itself in some workers. I’ll also show you how the numbers around the American and European roulette wheels are ordered in such a way that they do not reflect the betting layout. Then I’ll explain how the casino builds its edge at both the American and European game by using two distinct methods.
Here's another example: Since there are 38 slots on the wheel, we expect any given number to hit 1 out of 38 spins on average.  Now let's say you've been playing Roulette for a few hours, betting on Red every time, and you've been keeping track of what numbers have hit.  There have been 152 spins (4 x 38), and so we expect that each number should have come up 4 times on average.  You note, with some surprise, that #14 hasn't come up at all.  Does this mean that #14 is "due" and that you should bet on #14?  No.  Number 14 is not "due", no number is ever "due".  The wheel has no memory.
One last example:  You're betting on #27 every time, because that's one of your lucky numbers.  We expect it to come up once every 38 spins on average.  Luckily for you, it comes up on the 15th spin, making you a tidy profit.  Should you now start making other bets instead, on the assumption that #27 won't hit again soon because it just hit this time?  No.  You can certainly switch to another number if you want, but that won't improve or worsen your chances.  The chances of #27 coming up on a given spin are the same, whether it just come up on the last spin or not: 1 in 38.  I've seen roulette numbers repeat plenty of times.
Play on European wheels instead of American wheels when possible. The American Roulette wheel has an extra slot, 00, which decreases the odds of winning. One pocket may not seem like a big deal, but the impact on probability is drastic. On an American wheel, the house advantage is twice that of a European wheel, which means you could lose money twice as fast.[8] 

Place your bets. The first six bets are placed on the pockets numbered 0 to 36 on the game table. If you want to bet on column, place your bets on the empty pocket under the three columns. For the dozen, choose the pocket P12 for the first 12 numbers, M 12 for the 12 middle numbers and D 12 for the last 12 numbers. Finally, when you want to bet on the outside bets, use the red, black, even, odd, high or low pockets.
Some scammers will attempt to convince roulette players that betting trends can actually give them an edge even though the game is random. This section will explain why that can’t happen. Players should understand the bottom line of betting into a random game that has a house edge and that is – the house has the edge! Not too hard an idea to assimilate.
Like all betting strategies, in the long run the math is against you. This way of playing (aka "Martingale") will be successful only in the short term. Yes, you will see it work say, 9 times out of 10, but the winnings from your 9 successful session will not cover your losings from the 1 losing session you are bound to come across sooner or later. Casinos always have the edge on your money rather than the other way around. Statistically, this is like selling a lottery ticket. You have a large chance of a small win (the selling price of a losing ticket), but a small chance of a big loss (owing the holder of a winning ticket).

For any complete novices out there, a roulette wheel is made up of 37 numbered pockets (or 38 if you are playing American roulette – and as an initial piece of advice you shouldn’t, as it decreases your chances of winning!). Half of these numbers are coloured red and half are black with the ‘0’ pocket green. A small ball is introduced when the wheel is spinning and players must predict where the ball will land.
You’ll also see how the patterns of wins and losses tend to be different between the “inside” bets and the “outside proposition” bets. These betting choices will mean different amounts of session stakes despite the fact that the house has the same edge on both types of bets. Money management when you have the edge is different than managing money when you don’t have the edge. It tends to be the reverse. The more you play, the better the chance you will be ahead. But you must have enough money to do this.
Don't play. If you do, plan on an amount you can afford to lose and feel comfortable with. When it is gone, walk away and consider the money spent for the pleasure of playing the game. Remember that the casino is there to win your money and if you play long enough, the odds are in their favor and you will lose your money. If you happen to win and are ahead, take your money and get a nice dinner.

Another strategy that is good for more wary players is one known as the Paroli system. Here you make an initial bet of say £10 and if it loses you repeat the stake for the next spin. When your bet wins you double your stake for the next game and so on. If you then win three games in a row you should return back to your original stake. The thinking behind this system is that your luck will run out so it reigns in any outlandish bets before you get carried away.

Place your bets. The first six bets are placed on the pockets numbered 0 to 36 on the game table. If you want to bet on column, place your bets on the empty pocket under the three columns. For the dozen, choose the pocket P12 for the first 12 numbers, M 12 for the 12 middle numbers and D 12 for the last 12 numbers. Finally, when you want to bet on the outside bets, use the red, black, even, odd, high or low pockets.
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Betting trends properly can reduce exposure to the house edge and increase one’s pleasure at the game. My trend betting strategy will cover how to play trends and enjoy them more! Hey, give these a try: My Hello Red/Black, Odd/Even, and High/Low trend betting. Or my The Counter Trend betting strategy. Or my really conservative trend betting system. And there’s more!
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Try your hand at guessing the ball’s bounce. As the ball spins in the rim around the wheel, notice when it moves past a fixed point, such as the wheel's 0 pocket. Try to guess when the ball will slow down, fall from the rim, and start bouncing off of the deflectors that divide the wheel’s pockets. It’s difficult but, with practice, you may be able to guess which section of the wheel the ball will land after it stops bouncing.[10]
Another strategy that is good for more wary players is one known as the Paroli system. Here you make an initial bet of say £10 and if it loses you repeat the stake for the next spin. When your bet wins you double your stake for the next game and so on. If you then win three games in a row you should return back to your original stake. The thinking behind this system is that your luck will run out so it reigns in any outlandish bets before you get carried away.
If you plan on playing roulette, and want to look cool, then learn and practice the following strategies for best results. There are several strategies that people use for roulette, including the Martingale strategy, the James Bond strategy, and the D'Alembert strategy, among others. Although each of these strategies has its merits, none of them is guaranteed to make you money. In fact, all will lose money in the long run, so know when to quit. But read on to learn how!
No other game on the casino floor gives players the chance of close to 50/50 odds on a single bet. With the red/black, evens/odds, or 1-18/19-36 bets, you’re giving yourself the chance of hitting almost half the options on the Roulette wheel – the 0 and 00 aren’t counted – which gives you a pretty nice chance of winning. Granted, that means that the payout ratio is lower (1:1, bet $10 win $10) but by the numbers, it’s one of the safest and best roulette bets you can go with when playing the wheel.
Place your bets. The first six bets are placed on the pockets numbered 0 to 36 on the game table. If you want to bet on column, place your bets on the empty pocket under the three columns. For the dozen, choose the pocket P12 for the first 12 numbers, M 12 for the 12 middle numbers and D 12 for the last 12 numbers. Finally, when you want to bet on the outside bets, use the red, black, even, odd, high or low pockets.
Know a bit about the Fibonacci strategy. Leonardo Pisano Bigollo, also known as Fibonacci, was a famous Italian mathematician who discovered an interesting sequence of numbers which are now named after him. The sequence goes as follows, with numbers generated by adding the last two digits together: 1 - 1 - 2 - 3 - 5 - 8 - 13 - 21 - 34 - 55 - 89 - 144 - 233 - 377 - 610.[7]
Roulette is a simple game to play as long as the players follow the rules. This section will explain how the game works and what general types of bets can be made. This chapter is the primer for the entire game including the “inside” bets and “ outside proposition” bets; how to buy into a game; the purpose of the scoreboards and why the concept of a Horse’s Ass reflects itself in some workers. I’ll also show you how the numbers around the American and European roulette wheels are ordered in such a way that they do not reflect the betting layout. Then I’ll explain how the casino builds its edge at both the American and European game by using two distinct methods.
Here's another way to look at it:  Let's say you bet $10 on every number, one bet on each of the 38 spots.  So you've just thrown down $380 in bets.  Only one of those numbers will win, and will pay 35 to 1, so you'll get back $360 (the $350 you won plus your original $10 bet on that number).  You bet a total of $380 but you walked away with only $360, so you lost $20.  That $20 you lost represents the house edge of 5.26% ($20 lost divided by the $380 that you bet; $20 ÷ $380 = 5.26%).
Honestly, the woman who helped me was nice, even though she sounded very fake. Said she was going to call me back by a certain time and never did. I had to call for her to tel me that they couldn't switch the show. I got beautiful, I already saw it. It's not good for locals, their options suck and they charge more to cross off more shows. Nice idea, but horribly executed
At a first glance, there is no difference between the French and European Roulette, as the wheels have the same layout and numbers are arranged in the same sequence. The only difference between the two games is that French Roulette has two special rules which go by the name of “En Prison” and “La Partage”. The first kicks in when the ball lands on zero and as explained above, players won’t lose the wager, instead they will have a second chance to make a correct prediction. The “La Partage” also helps those who use the even money bet recuperate half of their investment, as 50% of their wager will be instantly refunded if the ball lands on 0.
I do not recommend Broadway Roulette. It seemed like it was going to be a great deal. When in reality, I ended up spending $79 per ticket for four of us. We were in the dead last row of the first balcony and saw "The Prom".  I should have known that what seemed like it was too good to be true...was too good to be true. Broadway Roulette informed me that the face value ticket price was $89. The price on the actual ticket was $57, and I paid $79. I only saved $10 per ticket on a show that I didn't particularly want to see in the first place, and had bad seats. You are better off going to the box office of the shows you really want to see the day of the performance.  But for someone that goes to a lot of shows and doesn't care what they see, or where they sit...maybe Broadway Roulette is for you.
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