If you want to be the best roulette player you can possibly be then you should have a good grasp of where the game came from – even before there was a game! Roulette hinges on one of the oldest beliefs in the world, the power of the circle. It is hard to determine where roulette actually originated and my introduction will not descend into the obscurity of the issue. Take my advice in this Roulette Guide. Read it all. And we start with the circle and the circle’s impact on our lives and how we actually view reality as a kind of circle.
Roulette is one of the world’s favourite casino games for a reason. Deceptively simple and yet hard to master, it’s a game that reveals added layers of complexity the more you study it. In other words, if you think roulette involves little more than watching a little ball bounce its way around a wheel while randomly tossing chips at sections of the table, you don’t understand roulette. Sure, you can play it that way, but discerning players know better than that. Discerning players appreciate that there’s a right way and a wrong way to approach roulette.
The odds of you winning will always be 50/50. So you have a 50% chance of LOSING $1, and a 50% chance of WINNING $0.50. You can’t just double bet size after losses, because then all you do is increase the amount you risk. Sure you may get lucky and win, but what happens if you lose? You’ll lose big. So there is no escaping the unfair payouts UNLESS you know which side of the coin is more likely to appear. Then you would be changing the odds of winning. And if you won much more often than 50% of the time, then the unfair payout wont matter as much.

Steer clear of the high-risk Martingale Strategy. For this strategy, you start by wagering the table minimum on a 50/50 outside bet. You keep betting that amount until you lose. When that happens, you double your bet for the next spin and keep doubling your bet until you win. While doubling your bet may help you recover the money you lost, it’s an extremely risky strategy.[15]

While I ultimately enjoyed both shows I wound up seeing through the service, I feel that it is not beneficial for someone who sees shows more often than once or twice per year. It is not exactly the great deal you are hoping for when you are first enticed by the flashy weekend promise of a $59 ticket, and if you keep up-to-date with Broadway news (which is likely how you found out about the service in the first place) you will already know about underrated/new shows on Broadway.


Yes! You can definitely find place online to play for high stakes. The important thing is to find a site that you feel very confident in that you can trust them with your money. With all of the shady practices that have been reported out there and because we feel that safety is so important, we wrote a page specifically about high stakes roulette and where to play at.

One of the most well-known systems when it comes to betting on roulette is the Martingale strategy. It is a very simple doubling up betting system. For example, if you start off by betting £10 on red and it comes in black, double your next bet to £20 on red. You need to keep on doing this until it lands on a red and this will cover your losses. The only thing to think about before embarking on this strategy is whether you have enough money to lose before that first winning spin.
Prior to rolling the ball, people place bets on what number will come up by laying down chips on a betting mat, the precise location of the chips indicating the bet being made. Roulette is a game of French origin and on a traditional table, the French terms on the betting area are still used even in English speaking areas. However, on most US tables, English terms and a slightly different style of mat are used.
Stick to your profit goal and loss limit. When it comes to roulette and any other gambling game, you should only bet an amount that you know you can afford to lose. Once you've decided how much money you're willing to lose, stick to that amount and don't be tempted to bet any more. Things can get out of hand quickly, especially with a game that goes so fast.[5]
It goes without saying that those who play American roulette that features two zeroes will have to deal with a bigger house edge. By contrast, those who prefer French Roulette, which is a version of European Roulette will have better chances to win, due to the “in prison” rule. Basically, if the ball lands on zero, the player doesn’t lose the wager, instead it is locked in for another spin. If the next wager is a winner, the money will be released, if not it goes to the casino’s coffers.
Place your bets. The first six bets are placed on the pockets numbered 0 to 36 on the game table. If you want to bet on column, place your bets on the empty pocket under the three columns. For the dozen, choose the pocket P12 for the first 12 numbers, M 12 for the 12 middle numbers and D 12 for the last 12 numbers. Finally, when you want to bet on the outside bets, use the red, black, even, odd, high or low pockets.
Keep in mind probability is a trend with no short-term guarantees. The real trick to roulette is to get lucky, then quit while you’re ahead. Every spin has a 1 in 37 (for European) or 1 in 38 (for American) chance of landing in a given pocket. Each spin is an individual trial with its own odds but, the longer you play, the more likely it is that you’ll fall into the probabilities that structure roulette.[9]
Most players don’t understand is this is no different to 4 different players making 4 different bets. And the odds of winning and payout are the same regardless. So what has the player changed with progression? Absolutely nothing except the amount they bet. The chances of winning or losing are the same on each spin. So if your system doesn’t win with flat betting (no progression), then it will fail with progression.
In most casinos players can continue making bets even while the ball is still spinning.  When the ball is close to dropping, the dealer will wave her hand over the table, which means "No more bets."  When the ball falls into a slot, the dealer will announce the number and the color, and place a marker on the winning number on the layout.  Then she'll scoop up all the losing bets towards the dealer area.  Next, she'll make the payouts by putting the winning chips next to the original bets.  After she's stacked up all the winning chips, she'll remove the marker, and then you can grab any chips you won.  Don't reach for your winnings until the dealer removes the marker, or the dealer will scold you!  New players often have to be told this repeatedly the first time they play because they kept forgetting and because they're excited about collecting their winnings.
Now, on Broadway Roulette's website FAQ section, they say "We do not include any partial view seats in our mix". However, my friends got LAST ROW of orchestra. They were not only extremely far from the stage, but worse, whenever King Kong stood up, they could not even see his head because of the extreme mezzanine overhang. My friends ended up paying above average for their tickets but got some of the worst seats in the Broadway Theatre, arguably quite partial in view.
Cross-reference roulette system: Cross referencing is a type of analysis where all available data is considered, and used to detect usable patterns. What makes it special is the data cross-referenced to ensure accuracy. This enables the player to better find hidden patterns in spins, and in less time. Also it enables players to quickly adjust when conditions at the wheel change. The method of cross referencing is not exclusive to roulette, and can be applied to other casino games. But this particular roulette system is combined with other predictive methods that are exclusive to roulette.
Like all good games, roulette is very easy to understand but still retains the sophistication of the numerous Hollywood films it stars in. And unlike some other popular casino games, learning how to bet is simple too. There aren’t any technical terms or complicated betting systems – at its very simplest you just choose what number that little ball will land on. Of course, there is more to it than that but it is a very easy game to start to play. But that is not to say that you can’t pick up some roulette wheel tips and tricks. Let’s teach you how to win at roulette!
This roulette strategy is the equivalent of a YANS and it might even be more wild and crazy than that. It is based upon the assertion that a chaotic betting system can overcome the chaos of randomness. Two wrongs make a right; that kind of thing. Two wrongs don’t make a right and chaos versus chaos is just, well, chaos versus chaos, as you shall see.
This is the most famous gambling system in the world - for roulette and for just about any type of game. Many people play a Martingale, often thinking they created it, but in reality this method of play has severely hurt those who have played it for any length of time. This section will explain all the details about the traditional Martingale systems, the Straight-Up Martingale and the Grand Martingale. You’ll also learn what we know about the Martingale’s strategy origin.
Crossing off only four shows leaves you with a lot of chances to receive a show you've already seen, and it's hard not to feel like the selection process is rigged when you a) don't get to see the wheel actually spin and b) following along on social media shows that a majority of people see the same few shows: Kinky Boots, Waitress, Head Over Heels and The Prom. These are shows that you could easily pick up a discounted ticket to using BroadwayBox or purchasing last-minute on StubHub, if not directly from the box office, where tickets usually start around this price, anyway. For example, weekend tickets to The Prom start at $69, to Kinky Boots, $79, and to Head Over Heels, just $49.
When you see that guy at the roulette table expertly throwing the chips down, he’s most likely using the Martingale Strategy. This method depends on doubling your bets after you take a loss, with the goal of recouping all previous losses and gaining a small profit. In other words, if you place your wagers only on a single color and continue doubling them until you win, you recover your losses. This is provided you keep doubling losing bets.

Practice playing at a free table before placing actual bets. See if the casino has a free table, purchase one to play at home, or play on one online just to get a feel for the game. This will introduce you to the various bets involved in roulette. You can make several types of wagers on a roulette table, which is basically a 3-column chart that lists the 36 numbers on the wheel. The types of wagers are grouped into 2 categories:[1]

Try your hand at guessing the ball’s bounce. As the ball spins in the rim around the wheel, notice when it moves past a fixed point, such as the wheel's 0 pocket. Try to guess when the ball will slow down, fall from the rim, and start bouncing off of the deflectors that divide the wheel’s pockets. It’s difficult but, with practice, you may be able to guess which section of the wheel the ball will land after it stops bouncing.[10]

A corner bet pays 8 to 1 and it is made by placing the chip at the crossroads of four numbers, indicating the player’s intention on betting on all adjacent numbers. The five number wager is rarely used, due to the fact that it applies only to American roulette and carries a massive house edge of 7.9% while the return on investment is 6 to 1. The odds are much fairer if you choose the double street wager, as you bet on six numbers and the payout is 5 to 1.

This is the most famous gambling system in the world - for roulette and for just about any type of game. Many people play a Martingale, often thinking they created it, but in reality this method of play has severely hurt those who have played it for any length of time. This section will explain all the details about the traditional Martingale systems, the Straight-Up Martingale and the Grand Martingale. You’ll also learn what we know about the Martingale’s strategy origin.
Like most casino games, there are a few different variations of roulette that you will come across, depending on what part of the world you are in and what type of casino you are playing at. If you’re scared we’re about to complicate this easy-to-learn game, don’t worry; the differences in the variations of these games are extremely small but important enough to point out.
If you want to be the best roulette player you can possibly be then you should have a good grasp of where the game came from – even before there was a game! Roulette hinges on one of the oldest beliefs in the world, the power of the circle. It is hard to determine where roulette actually originated and my introduction will not descend into the obscurity of the issue. Take my advice in this Roulette Guide. Read it all. And we start with the circle and the circle’s impact on our lives and how we actually view reality as a kind of circle.
It's important to understand that the outcome of the roulette wheel is truly random.  If Black has come up for the last 10 spins in a row, the next spin is not more likely to be Red.  Black and Red are still equally likely. There's an old saying, "The wheel has no memory."  That means it doesn't know what it spun before, and even if it did, the wheel can't select what number comes up out of its own volition.  There's more on this in my article Debunking the Gambler's Fallacy.
The greatest roulette players of all time – at least the most famous of them – are in this chapter. How much did they win and where and when did they play? You’ll meet the first two wheel trackers too. These would be Joseph Jagger who might be the first “biased wheel” watcher and W.N. Darnborough who had a huge string of successes before he retired.

Your first bet is $10 (or whatever your normal bet size is) on one of the even-money proposition wagers. If you lose that bet, you go to $20. Now, you sit out two spins; correct, you do not bet. After two sit-outs, on the next spin, you will increase your bet to $40. If you lose that? You quit and go back to your original bet. You’ve lost $70 on this sequence.
For any complete novices out there, a roulette wheel is made up of 37 numbered pockets (or 38 if you are playing American roulette – and as an initial piece of advice you shouldn’t, as it decreases your chances of winning!). Half of these numbers are coloured red and half are black with the ‘0’ pocket green. A small ball is introduced when the wheel is spinning and players must predict where the ball will land.
Few games in a casino are as intimidating to a beginner as the Roulette table – a sea of numbers, colors, and apparent impossibilities. Isn’t it easier to just go press buttons and watch reels spin on a slots machine instead? Surprisingly, no. While the Roulette table may seem confusing at first glance, in fact it’s a wonderfully simple casino game to understand… once you get the hang of it, of course. The key is to learn how to bet properly.
Why do so many people love to gamble? Is it merely a matter of winning money? There is more to it than just that. The player’s emotions add a lot to the games and perhaps the strongest emotion is the thrill of anticipation. To keep that thrill alive players have to resist the desire to play faster and faster. Slow-play keeps the adrenaline pumping. Fast play puts us into a kind of funk.

The argument frequently cited in support of this claim is that the numbers on the wheel will add up to 666, so there definitely has to be something unholy going on. You don’t need to a big fan of Goethe and his Faust to fall in love with the game though, but this theory could come in handy when going through a rough streak. It is always better to blame somebody else for your downswings, especially the devil, instead of taking responsibility for erratic gambling behavior.
Roulette is one of the world’s favourite casino games for a reason. Deceptively simple and yet hard to master, it’s a game that reveals added layers of complexity the more you study it. In other words, if you think roulette involves little more than watching a little ball bounce its way around a wheel while randomly tossing chips at sections of the table, you don’t understand roulette. Sure, you can play it that way, but discerning players know better than that. Discerning players appreciate that there’s a right way and a wrong way to approach roulette.
Please Note: The Martingale is much like the iceberg that sunk the Titanic. The loss of six to eight hands in a row seems like a real longshot; but the fact is that anyone who has played roulette has seen streaks of red or black, odd or even, or high or low coming up with such frequency many times. Casinos put a cap on how much a person can bet so that such relatively short streaks can sink the Martingale player.
Alternatively, you could wait for rare “triggers” that mean you skip many spins before betting. Then you apply an aggressive betting progression and may get lucky with a big win. The result of this is a lot of spins will occur, but you rarely bet. So you can last many thousands of spins without blowing your bankroll. This doesn’t make the system good. It just makes a losing strategy more boring to use. A strategy like this on a bankroll trend chart will show a lot of dramatic up and down bankroll spikes.
I used this service for the first time today and it was everything I hoped it would be! They sent an email by 930 am to let me know what show we'd gotten. In the email though they didn't state the time of the show and instead noted it as an "evening" show, which apparently was a glitch. Within half an hour a person, completely unprompted, from the company emailed me to apologize that the show time was missing and they sent a promo code for a small discount for my next purchase. This was totally unnecessary but was very nice of them!
The first time I tried Broadway Roulette we received tickets to Beautiful. Our tickets were in the back of the orchestra which I wasn't thrilled about, given that the theatre was mostly sort of empty, and that ticket prices at the box office started around what we'd paid for using the service. Similarly, my second experience garnered tickets to The Prom, which I loved, however the seats were in the mezzanine and, when all is said and done after the fees, the ticket price was very close to (if not more) the starting price for tickets to see that show in the same section.
Since there is a single zero slot on the European Roulette, manufacturers don’t need to make sure that it sits at the opposite side of the reel from any number. The rule still applies to same color numbers and consecutive ones, but the sequence is different and it goes like this, clockwise: 26, 3, 35, 12, 28, 7, 29, 18, 22, 9, 31, 14, 20, 1, 33, 16, 24, 5, 10, 23, 8, 30, 11, 36, 13, 27, 6, 34, 17, 25, 2, 21, 4, 19, 15, 32.
Now if you hit a winning number you will win a total of 140 chips (4 x 35 = 140), plus with the 4 chips you have from the winning bet you now have a total of 144 chips, so $144 in this case. This is a good return on your $20 investment! If you are looking for the best Roulette strategy to try now on your online Roulette game, give this one a go….it works very well!

Disclaimer: Gambling is a game of chance and there's no sure-fire formula that guarantee winnings. You can improve your winning chances by using the right in-game strategies but there is no way to predict when a machine or a Casino game is going to pay. Also, this page contains affiliate links. If you click through and play, we might earn a commission. That’s what allow us to keep CasinoSmash free and bring you the best online Casino bonuses!

So you’re ready to learn how to beat the house at roulette? Unfortunately, in the long run, the house is going to have an advantage, as is the case with all casino gambling. This does not mean you can’t be a winner and also does not mean you can’t employ a few strategies to give yourself a better chance of winning. Our experts present and analyze some of the most popular betting and strategy methods so you can decide if you’d like to employ them or not.
In other games the color of the chip denotes the denomination, but in Roulette the color denotes only which player the chip belongs to.  Roulette chips can in fact be any denomination—$1, $5, $25, etc.  When you buy in, tell the dealer what denomination you want. He'll put a marker on his stack of chips that are the same color to note how much each of your chips is worth.  Because roulette chips are non-denominational, you can't use them in other table games.  When you're done playing roulette, give your chips to the dealer and she'll exchange them for regular, denominational chips.
Assuming that the possible bets are all understood, Roulette is essentially a trivially simple game to play. For each turn, once all bets have been placed using coloured chips to distinguish each player, the croupier halts betting, spins the wheel, and rolls the ball in the opposite direction. When the ball comes to a halt in one of the slots, the croupier announces the result, collects all losing bets and pays out the winner's profits.

Roulette and craps are probably the two casino games with the longest pedigree. We know that dice were first used as a serious incantation to find out what the gods had in store for people. This was probably five thousand (or more) years ago. Should our army attack the village across the valley? Roll them bones – yes, either sheep bones or human bones composed the dice – and we’d find out what we should do.
Speaking of money, it’s important to note that money management in Roulette is crucial. Though the rewards of landing a 35:1 odd straight bet might seem enticing, the odds are heavily against you. Just keep in mind that before you wager, set yourself a loss limit. It’s easy to get caught up in the thrill of gambling especially with a group of people cheering the ball on, but a loss is a loss, and money should be managed in moderation. Whichever way the wheels of fortune spin, it’s great if you win big, but you’ll also feel better about yourself if you come away from the table with your bankroll intact.
Essentially, Roulette is all about odds, simple physics, and statistics. The word roulette means “little wheel”, and therefore it shouldn’t surprise you that the spinning roulette wheel was invented by a well-known gambler and math wizard. For the next hundred years or so, the early Roulette wheel remained untouched – until Francois and Louis Blanc came upon it. Thanks to their addition of the number zero space on the wheel, the house edge was immediately increased, and turned Roulette into a huge money winner for casinos from then on.
Make sure that you are playing in a reputable casino – or on a site that gives you a chance to win by having the random number generating software. In a real casino you may not be able to use the systems that cover all possible outcomes but with some practice, a disciplined approach and a little bit of what every roulette player needs – luck – you could find that it becomes your new favourite game.
I wanted to love this service because I love to support any female entrepreneur, however I don't think it is worth the money for someone who sees Broadway shows more often than once or twice per year. This service is perfect for someone who is in town for a day or two and would like to see any show (and doesn't care which one they see), but not for the Broadway enthusiast --- unless you use it so often that a majority of shows are automatically removed for you (Broadway Roulette will never send you to the same show twice, so after you log in again after your first show, it is already stricken from the list and you do not need to remove it again). 

A slightly more complex betting strategy, this system is based on the famous Fibonnaci sequence – 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, and so on, with each number being the sum of the previous two numbers. This sequence of numbers was conceived by the 13th century Italian mathematician Leonardo Pisano Bigollo, who first brought the Arabic numeral system to the west. To apply it to roulette, start your play with a real money online casino bet, and then simply apply this sequence with a matching bet increase every time you lose. Let’s say for example you bet $1. If you lose your bet, next time round you’ll bet $2 – then you’ll go from $2 to $3, $3 to $5, and up the rest of the sequence. Should you win your first bet, you’ll start again at $1. If you win further down the sequence, cross off the last two numbers at the point where you began to win, and start from the next one. The theory underpinning the system is that each lost bet will be recouped by betting the lost amount on the next wager, covering consecutive losses by moving up and down the numerical sequence. While a viable theory, like the Martingale, you could end up blowing your bankroll if you hit a solid losing streak.

It’s important to note that you don’t have to guess the number exactly, but you can guess characteristics of the number and still get paid. For example, if you choose to bet that the number rolled will be odd, you will get paid if the number determined by the white ball is odd. It doesn’t matter to you if it’s 13 or 31; you will still get paid on your bet.
Like all betting strategies, in the long run the math is against you. This way of playing (aka "Martingale") will be successful only in the short term. Yes, you will see it work say, 9 times out of 10, but the winnings from your 9 successful session will not cover your losings from the 1 losing session you are bound to come across sooner or later. Casinos always have the edge on your money rather than the other way around. Statistically, this is like selling a lottery ticket. You have a large chance of a small win (the selling price of a losing ticket), but a small chance of a big loss (owing the holder of a winning ticket).
Even if there isn't a betting limit, and if you have an infinite credit limit, it still doesn't really work, it just doesn't really fail either. If the martingale strategy is continued indefinitely and without regard to betting limits, your bankroll will hit arbitrarily high positive and negative values. The expected value is still negative, but the variation is so high that it your bankroll won't stay either negative or positive.
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