Roulette games have minimum bets, which will be posted on a placard at the table.  Minimum bets work differently for inside bets (specific numbers) and outside bets (everything else).  For outside bets, any bet you make has to be at least the table minimum.  Inside bets can usually be as small as you like, as long as the total of all your inside bets is the table minimum.  For example, with a table minimum of $5, you could put $5 on #14, or $1 each on #14, #27, #8/9, #28/29/30, and #19/20/22/23.  Remember that you can bet inside or outside if you like; there's no requirement to bet both on a given spin.
Here's another way to look at it:  Let's say you bet $10 on every number, one bet on each of the 38 spots.  So you've just thrown down $380 in bets.  Only one of those numbers will win, and will pay 35 to 1, so you'll get back $360 (the $350 you won plus your original $10 bet on that number).  You bet a total of $380 but you walked away with only $360, so you lost $20.  That $20 you lost represents the house edge of 5.26% ($20 lost divided by the $380 that you bet; $20 ÷ $380 = 5.26%).

Variations of games very similar to Roulette have been around for hundreds of years, therefore its exact origins are hard to trace. However, the version that we know and love today was devised by a French physicist, inventor and mathematician by the name of Blaise Pascal back in 1655. Of course, a game as seemingly complex as Roulette could only have been invented by a mad scientist – okay, he wasn’t really mad but he was a scientist. Pascal was trying to invent a perpetual motion machine – an experiment that failed in its original endeavor. For the non-science minded, a perpetual motion machine is a device that continues to operate without drawing energy from an outside source. A popular notion in the realm of “science” at the time. Though Pascal failed, he gave the world one of the most popular casino games in existence!


Before the game starts, players are instructed to place their bets. This is the time that you get to choose what you would like to wager on for the next spin. We will go over the different bet types and options available to you in depth later. Bets are made by placing your chips onto the felt in the area designated for the bet you would like to make.
The “house edge” is what enables the casino to profit. An example is the European wheel has 37 pockets, but a 35-1 payout on single numbers. So if you win 1 in 37 as you’d expect with random bet selection, you’d be paid 35 units plus your original bet, leaving you with 36 units. But if roulette’s payouts were fair, you’d be left with 37 units after the 37 spins. Simply the house edge is unfair payouts. And it affects every bet and every roulette strategy. Even when you win, you are still getting paid unfairly.
Go with the Fibonacci System for a low-risk, low-reward strategy. In this system, you place wagers only on the roughly 50/50 bets (such as odd/even), and you base your wagers on the Fibonacci numbers. If you lose in the first round, make your next wager the next number in the Fibonacci sequence in the second round. Keep advancing a number in the sequence until you win then, when you do win, go back 2 numbers in the sequence.[13]

Even if there isn't a betting limit, and if you have an infinite credit limit, it still doesn't really work, it just doesn't really fail either. If the martingale strategy is continued indefinitely and without regard to betting limits, your bankroll will hit arbitrarily high positive and negative values. The expected value is still negative, but the variation is so high that it your bankroll won't stay either negative or positive.
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