I am a roulette player. Neither an “editor” nor a “mathematician”. The difference is that I put my money where my mouth is. Most roulette sites are written by editors who have never placed a bet. They recycle knowledge and recite Wikipedia. And they are paid to write. I have paid dearly for every single word I write. I have invested money, time, aspirations and grey matter in roulette.
It's important to understand that the outcome of the roulette wheel is truly random.  If Black has come up for the last 10 spins in a row, the next spin is not more likely to be Red.  Black and Red are still equally likely. There's an old saying, "The wheel has no memory."  That means it doesn't know what it spun before, and even if it did, the wheel can't select what number comes up out of its own volition.  There's more on this in my article Debunking the Gambler's Fallacy.

The two key areas for Roulette betting is inside and outside. The minimum bet for the table is generally the same for both inside and outside of the table with one difference. Inside bets allow you to spread out the minimum bet over a range of numbers; whereas outside betting requires that a bet be made to equal the minimum. So if the minimum bet is $5, an inside bet must be made that adds up to $5, i.e. multiple chips can placed on the table covering a set of numbers that add up to the minimum. Each outside bet must equal $5.

I would use a Martingale only on the even-money outside bets at roulette, the odd or even, high or low, red or black. These bets give the player 18 chances to win with 20 chances to lose on the American double-zero wheels and 18 chances to win with 19 chances to lose on the European Roulette (single-zero wheels). Obviously, if you can play the European wheel that is the preferred one as long as the betting ranges fit your bankroll.
Here's another example: Since there are 38 slots on the wheel, we expect any given number to hit 1 out of 38 spins on average.  Now let's say you've been playing Roulette for a few hours, betting on Red every time, and you've been keeping track of what numbers have hit.  There have been 152 spins (4 x 38), and so we expect that each number should have come up 4 times on average.  You note, with some surprise, that #14 hasn't come up at all.  Does this mean that #14 is "due" and that you should bet on #14?  No.  Number 14 is not "due", no number is ever "due".  The wheel has no memory.

Payouts for this can be surprisingly rewarding if you’re willing to risk more money on each bet. Take Ashley Revell – he once bet $136,000 on a single spin of the Roulette wheel. If throwing down that sum of money on a single bet doesn’t sound impressive or at least make you sweat a little, know that the sum was the entirety of Revell’s life savings and the entire event was televised. So if Revell won, he’d double his money and evoke envy and admiration from his spectators; if he lost, he’d lose everything and earn deserved pity.


It is important that you cover as many numbers as possible, so make sure that you spread them out so each bet is covering two rows on their own, and not doubling up with another bet. As you will be covering 5 out of the 6 winning possible 6-lines, you stand a high chance of winning. If you win, you will win 20 chips (4 x 5 = 20), so including your winning bet you will now have a total of 24 chips.
They are equal in that there are 18 red and 18 black numbers on a roulette wheel. The 0 and 00 are both green numbers. However, there are 10 odd red numbers and 8 even red numbers. Also,the opposite is true in that there are 10 even black numbers and 8 odd black numbers. If you bet even and red or odd and black it seems you would have a slight edge as you would be covering 20 numbers instead of 18.
The divisions around the wheel are numbered from 1 to 36 in a seemingly random pattern and alternate red and black. Additionally, there is a green division numbered 0. On American tables only there is a second extra green division marked 00 and it is largely this that makes the American version of Roulette a worse proposition financially than the European game.
Using those simple measurements and the equations presented in the paper, the researchers were able to predict which half of the roulette wheel the ball would end up in about 59% of the time. By betting strategically in accordance with those predictions, this enabled them to get an 18% return on their gambling. That's compared to a -2.7% return in the normal course of roulette gambling.
Being organised is a good trait when it comes to roulette. Another one of the roulette betting tips that uses this to good effect is the La Bouchere system. Here you decide how much you want to win – let’s say 30 chips – and split the amount into sections: 4, 8, 6, 4, 6, 2. You take the numbers on the outside – here it would be 4 and 2 – and add them together to make your stake. You then bet on one of the 50:50 outside bets such as even. Repeat this until you have used all your chips. If any of the bets don’t win you add the total stake to one of the ends and bet as before. The system predicts that you should be able to end up with your desired amount of winnings. And that is when you leave the table before you discard the system and bet uncontrollably!
Like all betting strategies, in the long run the math is against you. This way of playing (aka "Martingale") will be successful only in the short term. Yes, you will see it work say, 9 times out of 10, but the winnings from your 9 successful session will not cover your losings from the 1 losing session you are bound to come across sooner or later. Casinos always have the edge on your money rather than the other way around. Statistically, this is like selling a lottery ticket. You have a large chance of a small win (the selling price of a losing ticket), but a small chance of a big loss (owing the holder of a winning ticket).
Play through is the number of times you’ll need to wager the bonus amount (or bonus and deposit combined) before you can make a withdrawal. Sometimes you’ll be able to withdraw the bonus itself, though often this will just be the winnings you accumulated while clearing it. 25x is a fair play-through, with anything higher than 40x not so player-friendly.
Cross-reference roulette system: Cross referencing is a type of analysis where all available data is considered, and used to detect usable patterns. What makes it special is the data cross-referenced to ensure accuracy. This enables the player to better find hidden patterns in spins, and in less time. Also it enables players to quickly adjust when conditions at the wheel change. The method of cross referencing is not exclusive to roulette, and can be applied to other casino games. But this particular roulette system is combined with other predictive methods that are exclusive to roulette.

Roulette – in movies, on TV, and in literature, it’s often depicted as glamorous, exciting, and ridiculously lucrative for whichever character is playing. While winning big at the spinning wheel seems like a fantasy reserved for James Bond and other fictional high rollers, it is possible to minimize risk and win big at the same time by knowing the best roulette bets. It all comes down to the numbers, and how you want to play them.
This strategy is designed to win you money when things are going well for you. It is one of the most popular methods of betting although we now call it a “parley.” Just about every gambler knows what a parley is – and how it can make a good night a great night and a bad night a terrible night. Mr. Paroli, whoever he was, discovered it and applied it to gambling. It’s geared to gaining big wins compared to the systems mentioned before which are geared to protecting you against losses..
Speaking of money, it’s important to note that money management in Roulette is crucial. Though the rewards of landing a 35:1 odd straight bet might seem enticing, the odds are heavily against you. Just keep in mind that before you wager, set yourself a loss limit. It’s easy to get caught up in the thrill of gambling especially with a group of people cheering the ball on, but a loss is a loss, and money should be managed in moderation. Whichever way the wheels of fortune spin, it’s great if you win big, but you’ll also feel better about yourself if you come away from the table with your bankroll intact.

Broadway Roulette is for people who consistently watch Broadway shows and are ok with getting tickets to mediocre shows. I used this service for my husbands birthday and he was not happy. If you want to see a Broadway show my advice is to pay the money you would have paid to Ticketmaster/etc. that way you are not left paying for tickets that are not worth it. When I got my tickets the rate on the ticket was $49pp when you pay Broadway Roulette it's $69pp. We got tickets to Frankie and Johnnie. It wasn't a show we were familiar with and did not enjoy it at all. We are a young couple in our early 30s and this show is for older couples. We didn't get a lot of the references in the show. I wouldn't do this again. I would rather spend the extra $30 and see a show I would enjoy!!
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