My take on the Paroli system is to use the three-win method but to start it after the session bankroll has gone up. So the first bet, if won, does not entail an increase in the betting for the second bet. Instead the second bet is the same as the first, $10. If that bet is a winner then the player’s bankroll, $500, is above the minimum. Now with that second win, the third bet entails the player going the full Paroli bore. With any loss, the player goes back to the original $10 bet. 
Martingale Roulette System – This is a system that involves increasing bets after a loss until you get a win. It is commonly used on Red or Black but it can be applied all over the table if you have the correct progression. Not only have we gone through every bet, we have tables showing the overall loss at each stage and we’ve shown you the odds of going on a bad losing run i.e: 10 Reds in a row when you’re betting on Black.

Here's another way to look at it:  Let's say you bet $10 on every number, one bet on each of the 38 spots.  So you've just thrown down $380 in bets.  Only one of those numbers will win, and will pay 35 to 1, so you'll get back $360 (the $350 you won plus your original $10 bet on that number).  You bet a total of $380 but you walked away with only $360, so you lost $20.  That $20 you lost represents the house edge of 5.26% ($20 lost divided by the $380 that you bet; $20 ÷ $380 = 5.26%). 

While I ultimately enjoyed both shows I wound up seeing through the service, I feel that it is not beneficial for someone who sees shows more often than once or twice per year. It is not exactly the great deal you are hoping for when you are first enticed by the flashy weekend promise of a $59 ticket, and if you keep up-to-date with Broadway news (which is likely how you found out about the service in the first place) you will already know about underrated/new shows on Broadway. 

The greatest roulette players of all time – at least the most famous of them – are in this chapter. How much did they win and where and when did they play? You’ll meet the first two wheel trackers too. These would be Joseph Jagger who might be the first “biased wheel” watcher and W.N. Darnborough who had a huge string of successes before he retired.
Don't play. If you do, plan on an amount you can afford to lose and feel comfortable with. When it is gone, walk away and consider the money spent for the pleasure of playing the game. Remember that the casino is there to win your money and if you play long enough, the odds are in their favor and you will lose your money. If you happen to win and are ahead, take your money and get a nice dinner.
This system is often referred to as the Gambler’s Fallacy. It posits that if events are too tilted in one direction --- say heads appearing 80 percent in the first 10 coin tosses --- then tails must hit more to catch up with it since we are dealing with a 50/50 proposition. Even though this sounds reasonable it is not so as I shall explain in this section.
So what were some of the most famous systems used by our ancestors in attempting to beat the wheel? Are any of these still used today when people are learning how to play roulette? I can easily answer both of these questions, with the latter first: Yes! the systems of the past are still used today. Why? Because they are fun to play and structure a player’s game-plan in a way that makes sense to the player. A player always knows what to do next when playing a system. There’s no guesswork in how or what to do next.
Beginners should stick to betting outside the table. Though the profits may not be as large, they are statistically more consistent. Betting red or black, high or low, and odd or even ensures a lower probability of losing money, as all of these bets pay out even money. Straight bets are a long shot, and consistent outside betting yields more return in the long term.
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It's important to understand that the outcome of the roulette wheel is truly random.  If Black has come up for the last 10 spins in a row, the next spin is not more likely to be Red.  Black and Red are still equally likely. There's an old saying, "The wheel has no memory."  That means it doesn't know what it spun before, and even if it did, the wheel can't select what number comes up out of its own volition.  There's more on this in my article Debunking the Gambler's Fallacy.
French Roulette is almost the same as European Roulette, except that the betting board is laid out in a different manner and there are a few small rules differences. These rules, known as the “La Partage” rule and the “en prison” rule, are optionally used in some casinos. These rules do have a more significant effect on gameplay, so if you are going to a casino that offers this variation, we recommend clicking below for more comprehensive details.
As an off-topic point, I was also put-off by a post I read on their website blog about what a theatre goer should and should not wear to the theatre. While the main point of the article was not to wear denim cutoffs to the show, they also bizarrely and randomly listed a number of other things patrons "shouldn't" wear, including vintage jeans, old logo t-shirts (something that, if the writer was actually as trendy as she smugly purported to be, she might know are back in style and can be dressed up quite nicely under a cool jacket or layered necklace) and leggings. For a brand that capitalizes wildly on "making Broadway accessible to everyone," it came off grossly classist and policing of what I can only assume is its target demographic --- young people on a budget.  

On an American wheel, there are 38 spots: numbers 1-36, plus 0 and 00.  Your odds of winning a one-number bet are 37 to 1 (37 ways to lose, 1 way to win).  But if you win, the casino doesn't pay you 37 to 1, they pay you less: 35 to 1.  The difference between the true odds and what they actually pay you is 2/38, or 5.26%.  You can do this same calculation for the other bets, and it comes out the same. 

Keep in mind probability is a trend with no short-term guarantees. The real trick to roulette is to get lucky, then quit while you’re ahead. Every spin has a 1 in 37 (for European) or 1 in 38 (for American) chance of landing in a given pocket. Each spin is an individual trial with its own odds but, the longer you play, the more likely it is that you’ll fall into the probabilities that structure roulette.[9]


Payouts for this can be surprisingly rewarding if you’re willing to risk more money on each bet. Take Ashley Revell – he once bet $136,000 on a single spin of the Roulette wheel. If throwing down that sum of money on a single bet doesn’t sound impressive or at least make you sweat a little, know that the sum was the entirety of Revell’s life savings and the entire event was televised. So if Revell won, he’d double his money and evoke envy and admiration from his spectators; if he lost, he’d lose everything and earn deserved pity.
The first time I tried Broadway Roulette we received tickets to Beautiful. Our tickets were in the back of the orchestra which I wasn't thrilled about, given that the theatre was mostly sort of empty, and that ticket prices at the box office started around what we'd paid for using the service. Similarly, my second experience garnered tickets to The Prom, which I loved, however the seats were in the mezzanine and, when all is said and done after the fees, the ticket price was very close to (if not more) the starting price for tickets to see that show in the same section.
You can get your chips in different monetary denominations. When you hand the dealer your chips, he or she will ask what denomination you want to designate your chips. If you're at a $5 minimum table, you could make them $1 or you could make them $100 (or anywhere in between). Once you've chosen, they'll place a chip on top of the rail, with a marker on top of that to indicate your colored chips' value.[5]

There are 17 main types of bets in European roulette and one extra bet in American. This extra bet is the Basket bet, which is by far the worse bet one can make and should be avoided. It bets 5 numbers 0, 00, 1, 2, 3 has a winning odds of 5:38 and only pays 6:1, which means a player disadvantage (house edge) of 7,9%, which is extremely unfair compared with the standard 5,3% house edge of all other bets of the American, double zero, roulette or the 2,7% house advantage of the European, single zero, roulette.
Roulette is an exciting game, but it’s all too easy to get carried away and start throwing down bets on anything and everything. Before you know it, you’ve lost your bankroll and you’re having to take time out to deposit more funds into your account or are having to call it a day. Money management is all about making every credit count and wagering in a manner that provides the best chance of seeing a return. Learn to look after your money and your money will look after you. Our money management guide will prevent you from busting out in record time and will maximise your prospects of success.
Payouts for this can be surprisingly rewarding if you’re willing to risk more money on each bet. Take Ashley Revell – he once bet $136,000 on a single spin of the Roulette wheel. If throwing down that sum of money on a single bet doesn’t sound impressive or at least make you sweat a little, know that the sum was the entirety of Revell’s life savings and the entire event was televised. So if Revell won, he’d double his money and evoke envy and admiration from his spectators; if he lost, he’d lose everything and earn deserved pity.
The divisions around the wheel are numbered from 1 to 36 in a seemingly random pattern and alternate red and black. Additionally, there is a green division numbered 0. On American tables only there is a second extra green division marked 00 and it is largely this that makes the American version of Roulette a worse proposition financially than the European game.
Know a bit about the Fibonacci strategy. Leonardo Pisano Bigollo, also known as Fibonacci, was a famous Italian mathematician who discovered an interesting sequence of numbers which are now named after him. The sequence goes as follows, with numbers generated by adding the last two digits together: 1 - 1 - 2 - 3 - 5 - 8 - 13 - 21 - 34 - 55 - 89 - 144 - 233 - 377 - 610.[7]

Columns don’t contain consecutive numbers – for example, the first column has 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 16, 19, 22, 25, 28, and 31 – and the number of red and black numbers differs between each column, a fact that we’ll cover in a moment. And remember, the 0 and 00 aren’t included in any of the columns because they’re special and too good for all the other numbers.

Some scammers will attempt to convince roulette players that betting trends can actually give them an edge even though the game is random. This section will explain why that can’t happen. Players should understand the bottom line of betting into a random game that has a house edge and that is – the house has the edge! Not too hard an idea to assimilate.
French and some European Roulette tables also utilize what are known as French or called bets. These refer to certain sections of the Roulette table that represented by corresponding numbers and phrases on an ellipse. These are Voisin du zero, Orphelins and Tiers du Cylindre, and are based on a particular section’s proximity to zero. The numbers within the ellipse function in a similar manner. 

The divisions around the wheel are numbered from 1 to 36 in a seemingly random pattern and alternate red and black. Additionally, there is a green division numbered 0. On American tables only there is a second extra green division marked 00 and it is largely this that makes the American version of Roulette a worse proposition financially than the European game.
I do not recommend Broadway Roulette. It seemed like it was going to be a great deal. When in reality, I ended up spending $79 per ticket for four of us. We were in the dead last row of the first balcony and saw "The Prom".  I should have known that what seemed like it was too good to be true...was too good to be true. Broadway Roulette informed me that the face value ticket price was $89. The price on the actual ticket was $57, and I paid $79. I only saved $10 per ticket on a show that I didn't particularly want to see in the first place, and had bad seats. You are better off going to the box office of the shows you really want to see the day of the performance.  But for someone that goes to a lot of shows and doesn't care what they see, or where they sit...maybe Broadway Roulette is for you.
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