The first time I tried Broadway Roulette we received tickets to Beautiful. Our tickets were in the back of the orchestra which I wasn't thrilled about, given that the theatre was mostly sort of empty, and that ticket prices at the box office started around what we'd paid for using the service. Similarly, my second experience garnered tickets to The Prom, which I loved, however the seats were in the mezzanine and, when all is said and done after the fees, the ticket price was very close to (if not more) the starting price for tickets to see that show in the same section.

Variations of games very similar to Roulette have been around for hundreds of years, therefore its exact origins are hard to trace. However, the version that we know and love today was devised by a French physicist, inventor and mathematician by the name of Blaise Pascal back in 1655. Of course, a game as seemingly complex as Roulette could only have been invented by a mad scientist – okay, he wasn’t really mad but he was a scientist. Pascal was trying to invent a perpetual motion machine – an experiment that failed in its original endeavor. For the non-science minded, a perpetual motion machine is a device that continues to operate without drawing energy from an outside source. A popular notion in the realm of “science” at the time. Though Pascal failed, he gave the world one of the most popular casino games in existence!
It's important to understand that the outcome of the roulette wheel is truly random.  If Black has come up for the last 10 spins in a row, the next spin is not more likely to be Red.  Black and Red are still equally likely. There's an old saying, "The wheel has no memory."  That means it doesn't know what it spun before, and even if it did, the wheel can't select what number comes up out of its own volition.  There's more on this in my article Debunking the Gambler's Fallacy.
If you plan on playing roulette, and want to look cool, then learn and practice the following strategies for best results. There are several strategies that people use for roulette, including the Martingale strategy, the James Bond strategy, and the D'Alembert strategy, among others. Although each of these strategies has its merits, none of them is guaranteed to make you money. In fact, all will lose money in the long run, so know when to quit. But read on to learn how!
You can’t determine which number that ball will land on but you can determine the amount you’ll win when your bet comes in. The best players have a roulette strategy, which can range from the extremely simple to the surprisingly complex. Approaching roulette with a gameplan in mind makes sense as it’s a smart way to make the most of your money. Whether you choose to play conservatively or aggressively will depend on a number of factors including the level of profit you’re seeking and the level of risk you’re willing to expose yourself to. We’ve put together a guide to some of the best roulette playing strategies available.

Now, on Broadway Roulette's website FAQ section, they say "We do not include any partial view seats in our mix". However, my friends got LAST ROW of orchestra. They were not only extremely far from the stage, but worse, whenever King Kong stood up, they could not even see his head because of the extreme mezzanine overhang. My friends ended up paying above average for their tickets but got some of the worst seats in the Broadway Theatre, arguably quite partial in view.
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