Like most casino games, there are a few different variations of roulette that you will come across, depending on what part of the world you are in and what type of casino you are playing at. If you’re scared we’re about to complicate this easy-to-learn game, don’t worry; the differences in the variations of these games are extremely small but important enough to point out.


The only real drawbacks to live roulette deal with logistics and crowdedness. As it is such a popular game, you can expect most tables to be pretty packed most of the time, and especially on peak nights. This can make it challenging to get a seat and can overwhelm some people, as the tables will typically get quite crowded with people reaching over you to make bets.
Español: practicar una estrategia en la ruleta, Italiano: Giocare Strategicamente alla Roulette, Deutsch: Roulette Strategien, Français: mettre en œuvre une stratégie à la roulette, Русский: использовать системы игры в рулетку, Português: Praticar Estratégia de Roleta, Nederlands: Oefenen met roulettestrategieën, العربية: تعلم استراتيجيات لعبة الروليت
Here's another way to look at it:  Let's say you bet $10 on every number, one bet on each of the 38 spots.  So you've just thrown down $380 in bets.  Only one of those numbers will win, and will pay 35 to 1, so you'll get back $360 (the $350 you won plus your original $10 bet on that number).  You bet a total of $380 but you walked away with only $360, so you lost $20.  That $20 you lost represents the house edge of 5.26% ($20 lost divided by the $380 that you bet; $20 ÷ $380 = 5.26%).
I read an interview that the founder did wherein she said Broadway Roulette prides itself on being all about discovery, i.e funneling people to shows that are new or struggling that the average consumer might not visit on their own. However, someone looking for cheap/random/last-minute Broadway tickets is more likely to see one of those shows due to their low box office cost and sheer availability, so it doesn't seem worthwhile to utilize Broadway Roulette as a service if that's what you're going for. Most of the fun of Broadway Roulette is the gamble --- the chance that you might get a hot show for a low cost --- and yet the service is geared towards those last-minute impulse purchases that a consumer could easily achieve for the same price at a random show's box office if they were so inclined, especially since you don't find out what show you're going to be seeing until that same day.
If real wheels isn’t your thing, by far your best option is Betvoyager’s No-zero roulette. Basically the wheel has no house edge, so during the game the casino has no advantage over you. The only catch is when you win, you pay 10% of winnings to the casino. See the image below and you’ll notice there’s no zero on the table. See a detailed review of here.
In other games the color of the chip denotes the denomination, but in Roulette the color denotes only which player the chip belongs to.  Roulette chips can in fact be any denomination—$1, $5, $25, etc.  When you buy in, tell the dealer what denomination you want. He'll put a marker on his stack of chips that are the same color to note how much each of your chips is worth.  Because roulette chips are non-denominational, you can't use them in other table games.  When you're done playing roulette, give your chips to the dealer and she'll exchange them for regular, denominational chips.
Stick to your profit goal and loss limit. When it comes to roulette and any other gambling game, you should only bet an amount that you know you can afford to lose. Once you've decided how much money you're willing to lose, stick to that amount and don't be tempted to bet any more. Things can get out of hand quickly, especially with a game that goes so fast.[5]
If you come out even on total number of wins and losses, using the D’Alembert Strategy will put you in the black. Here’s an example: say you put down a bet of $10 on red. You lose, so you bet $11 on red again. You lose again, so your wager goes up to $12. You win, so you go back down to $11 and win again. You pick up your winnings and walk away. You lost two wagers and won two wagers, so the math comes out like this: – 10 – 11 + 12 + 11 = +2. The disadvantage to this strategy is simply keeping track of your number of wins and losses.
Roulette is a simple game to play as long as the players follow the rules. This section will explain how the game works and what general types of bets can be made. This chapter is the primer for the entire game including the “inside” bets and “ outside proposition” bets; how to buy into a game; the purpose of the scoreboards and why the concept of a Horse’s Ass reflects itself in some workers. I’ll also show you how the numbers around the American and European roulette wheels are ordered in such a way that they do not reflect the betting layout. Then I’ll explain how the casino builds its edge at both the American and European game by using two distinct methods.
As an off-topic point, I was also put-off by a post I read on their website blog about what a theatre goer should and should not wear to the theatre. While the main point of the article was not to wear denim cutoffs to the show, they also bizarrely and randomly listed a number of other things patrons "shouldn't" wear, including vintage jeans, old logo t-shirts (something that, if the writer was actually as trendy as she smugly purported to be, she might know are back in style and can be dressed up quite nicely under a cool jacket or layered necklace) and leggings. For a brand that capitalizes wildly on "making Broadway accessible to everyone," it came off grossly classist and policing of what I can only assume is its target demographic --- young people on a budget.
Place your bets. The first six bets are placed on the pockets numbered 0 to 36 on the game table. If you want to bet on column, place your bets on the empty pocket under the three columns. For the dozen, choose the pocket P12 for the first 12 numbers, M 12 for the 12 middle numbers and D 12 for the last 12 numbers. Finally, when you want to bet on the outside bets, use the red, black, even, odd, high or low pockets.
Stick to your profit goal and loss limit. When it comes to roulette and any other gambling game, you should only bet an amount that you know you can afford to lose. Once you've decided how much money you're willing to lose, stick to that amount and don't be tempted to bet any more. Things can get out of hand quickly, especially with a game that goes so fast.[5] 

The history of the game begins more than 300 years ago, at the end of the 17th century, with Frenchman Blaise Pascal being credited with this invention. Apparently, he was trying to create a perpetual motion machine as he was studying probabilities, but the outcome took him by surprise. The roulette wheel gained a lot of traction relatively quickly and by the end of the century, it was a popular game in Paris.
French and some European Roulette tables also utilize what are known as French or called bets. These refer to certain sections of the Roulette table that represented by corresponding numbers and phrases on an ellipse. These are Voisin du zero, Orphelins and Tiers du Cylindre, and are based on a particular section’s proximity to zero. The numbers within the ellipse function in a similar manner.

French Roulette is almost the same as European Roulette, except that the betting board is laid out in a different manner and there are a few small rules differences. These rules, known as the “La Partage” rule and the “en prison” rule, are optionally used in some casinos. These rules do have a more significant effect on gameplay, so if you are going to a casino that offers this variation, we recommend clicking below for more comprehensive details.
×