Did this when friends were visiting and loved it!  Total bargain for $50.  Saw Come From Away which I would never have chosen to go to myself.  All four of us loved the show, and the seats were great.  I live in NYC so will be doing this regularly.  Have also just got my in-laws and husband to do it this week.  If you are not bothered about what show you see, its a must do.  And you can eliminate 4/5 shows you don't want to see.  Plus if you book with them more than once, they will never send you to the same show twice. Highly recommend.
Bet on the inside in moderation to increase your payout. Though they have the highest payout, straight bets on a single number are risky. The odds of the ball landing on the exact number you chose is 1 in 37 (2.7%) for European wheels and 1 in 38 (2.63%) for American wheels. In addition to making a straight bet on a single number, you can also divide the odds between multiple numbers.[3]
Assuming that the possible bets are all understood, Roulette is essentially a trivially simple game to play. For each turn, once all bets have been placed using coloured chips to distinguish each player, the croupier halts betting, spins the wheel, and rolls the ball in the opposite direction. When the ball comes to a halt in one of the slots, the croupier announces the result, collects all losing bets and pays out the winner's profits.

In other games the color of the chip denotes the denomination, but in Roulette the color denotes only which player the chip belongs to.  Roulette chips can in fact be any denomination—$1, $5, $25, etc.  When you buy in, tell the dealer what denomination you want. He'll put a marker on his stack of chips that are the same color to note how much each of your chips is worth.  Because roulette chips are non-denominational, you can't use them in other table games.  When you're done playing roulette, give your chips to the dealer and she'll exchange them for regular, denominational chips.


You don’t have to be a mathematical genius to excel at roulette but it makes sense to memorise the sort of odds you’ll receive for different bets. Although it’s unlikely that a croupier will make a mistake and underpay you, if you don’t know the odds of the bet you’ve placed, how are you supposed to correct them? Even if you’re only playing online roulette, it still pays to familiarise yourself with the odds you’ll receive for betting on different sections of the table. That way you’ll be able to calculate the possible return and can adjust your strategy accordingly. If you don’t know the difference between zero and double-zero roulette for instance, you don’t know how to calculate your odds and you’re just guessing. Don’t guess – calculate. We’ll show you how.
 One of the most popular Roulette strategies, the Martingale system, is a fairly easy one to learn and replicate. The system itself is named after London casino owner John Henry Martindale, who encouraged players to double their bets after a loss. It works like this: simply place an even money bet, and if you lose, double your bet the next time round. If you win, place the exact same original bet on the next spin. Using this betting strategy will help you keep control of your bankroll, and while you may not win millions, you’ll be able to walk away with a healthy account balance – which most players would call a win in itself.
I do not recommend Broadway Roulette. It seemed like it was going to be a great deal. When in reality, I ended up spending $79 per ticket for four of us. We were in the dead last row of the first balcony and saw "The Prom".  I should have known that what seemed like it was too good to be true...was too good to be true. Broadway Roulette informed me that the face value ticket price was $89. The price on the actual ticket was $57, and I paid $79. I only saved $10 per ticket on a show that I didn't particularly want to see in the first place, and had bad seats. You are better off going to the box office of the shows you really want to see the day of the performance.  But for someone that goes to a lot of shows and doesn't care what they see, or where they sit...maybe Broadway Roulette is for you.
My husband and I used BR for the first time this past week, and it was everything we expected and more! I'm a HUGE reader of reviews before I commit/buy something, so I read a lot on here. We had only seen one other musical, so we just crossed off a few we didn't really care AS much about (we like everything haha). We were so dang excited leading up to the morning of wondering what we would receive. The morning of at 8:30 I got a text saying they were spinning the wheel and we would be notified soon. At 9am we got a text saying, Congrats, you won tickets to Chicago. We LOVE the Chicago songs, so we were so pleased. We went to the will call booth about 30 mins before the show and picked up the tickets with ease and got great orchestra seats! It was an amazing show to say the least! We will DEFINITELY be doing BR when we come to town again. Amazing service that gives your experience some spontaneity. Give it a try! It won't disappoint :)
My goal with this roulette strategy is to keep you away from the devastating loss that the Martingale ultimately entails. Plenty of times on the two spins that you sit out there will be a winning spin – had you bet it. More times there won’t. Remember the casino has that edge on all of those even-money wagers. That fact should always be front and center in your mind. Never think you are playing an even game even on bets called “even-money” bets.  
So now you are going to place your 22 stacks of 4 chips on any of the straight up numbers. Do not double up, make sure you just use 4 chips maximum on any number so you cover as much of the table as possible. Then with the remaining 2 chips, place them on any of the empty numbers (1 chip on each), so if you do hit one of these you can start the process again.
For example, if you would like to bet that the outcome of the roll will be black, you would place your chips in the space marked for black on the felt. If you would like to bet that the outcome of the roll will be a specific number, you would place your bet right on top of that number on the felt. Want to make multiple bets? No problem. Let’s say you wanted to bet on black and you also wanted to bet on the number 31. You would place one bet onto the black section and then place another bet directly on the number 31.
The history of the game begins more than 300 years ago, at the end of the 17th century, with Frenchman Blaise Pascal being credited with this invention. Apparently, he was trying to create a perpetual motion machine as he was studying probabilities, but the outcome took him by surprise. The roulette wheel gained a lot of traction relatively quickly and by the end of the century, it was a popular game in Paris.
Never feel like you have to leave or have to stay when you’re playing roulette. Because each spin of the wheel is a completely independent and separate game, you can stay for one roll or stay for hours. If you’re on a roll, literally, you can keep playing and try to put together a big winning session. If things aren’t quite going your way, you’re under no obligation to stay past one roll. This sort of flexibility also allows you to get in a quick session if you need a rush but don’t have a lot of time.

By the way, I want to take a moment to point out that this tidbit above about even money bets in Atlantic City is just one of the many fabulous bonuses you learn about for free on this site, which you might not find out about from books that cost actual money.  When I was learning about gambling, the first thing I did was to buy and read the book The Complete Idiot's Guide to Gambling Like a Pro. But in 332 pages they didn't see fit to mention the low edge in Atlantic City, so I didn't know about it.  I found out about it when an Atlantic City dealer took only one of my two chips on a losing bet and I had to ask why.
Try your hand at guessing the ball’s bounce. As the ball spins in the rim around the wheel, notice when it moves past a fixed point, such as the wheel's 0 pocket. Try to guess when the ball will slow down, fall from the rim, and start bouncing off of the deflectors that divide the wheel’s pockets. It’s difficult but, with practice, you may be able to guess which section of the wheel the ball will land after it stops bouncing.[10]
You now have 90 chips from your initial $20 buy-in, so you are doing well. But there is one final step that can improve your winnings even more. Now we are going to bet straight up bets, the highest paying bet on the Roulette wheel. So for this you need to break your 90 chips down into 22 stacks of 4 chips (total 88 chips) and you will have 2 left over for insurance.

A corner bet pays 8 to 1 and it is made by placing the chip at the crossroads of four numbers, indicating the player’s intention on betting on all adjacent numbers. The five number wager is rarely used, due to the fact that it applies only to American roulette and carries a massive house edge of 7.9% while the return on investment is 6 to 1. The odds are much fairer if you choose the double street wager, as you bet on six numbers and the payout is 5 to 1.
I am a roulette player. Neither an “editor” nor a “mathematician”. The difference is that I put my money where my mouth is. Most roulette sites are written by editors who have never placed a bet. They recycle knowledge and recite Wikipedia. And they are paid to write. I have paid dearly for every single word I write. I have invested money, time, aspirations and grey matter in roulette.
Roulette games have minimum bets, which will be posted on a placard at the table.  Minimum bets work differently for inside bets (specific numbers) and outside bets (everything else).  For outside bets, any bet you make has to be at least the table minimum.  Inside bets can usually be as small as you like, as long as the total of all your inside bets is the table minimum.  For example, with a table minimum of $5, you could put $5 on #14, or $1 each on #14, #27, #8/9, #28/29/30, and #19/20/22/23.  Remember that you can bet inside or outside if you like; there's no requirement to bet both on a given spin.
As an off-topic point, I was also put-off by a post I read on their website blog about what a theatre goer should and should not wear to the theatre. While the main point of the article was not to wear denim cutoffs to the show, they also bizarrely and randomly listed a number of other things patrons "shouldn't" wear, including vintage jeans, old logo t-shirts (something that, if the writer was actually as trendy as she smugly purported to be, she might know are back in style and can be dressed up quite nicely under a cool jacket or layered necklace) and leggings. For a brand that capitalizes wildly on "making Broadway accessible to everyone," it came off grossly classist and policing of what I can only assume is its target demographic --- young people on a budget.
We got tickets to see The Prom. We paid $70 each with fees and the upgrade to remove two additional selections and ended up getting tickets on the mezzanine. The price on the ticket indicated $61 which I'm going to assume was BR's negotiated price as it appeared the same tickets would have been about $89 if we bought them ourselves. Not sure I would use this service again as I didn't think it represented that significant of a savings given you don't have control of what you are seeing. However if you are open to seeing anything and just want some inexpensive tickets this is a good way to do it.
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