If you say you only need a system to win in “your lifetime of spins”, you aren’t paying attention. Remember there could be 100 players all playing 1,000 spins, which is 100,000 spins in total. From those 100 players, perhaps 47 will be winners, and 53 will be losers. Again most are losers. You have no way of controlling if you are one of the winners or losers. You are all using the same system, and the results depend entirely on whether you get “suitable spins” or not.

I would use a Martingale only on the even-money outside bets at roulette, the odd or even, high or low, red or black. These bets give the player 18 chances to win with 20 chances to lose on the American double-zero wheels and 18 chances to win with 19 chances to lose on the European Roulette (single-zero wheels). Obviously, if you can play the European wheel that is the preferred one as long as the betting ranges fit your bankroll.

Make outside bets for better odds of winning. As long as you make the table minimum for each individual bet, you can make multiple outside bets to increase your odds of a payout. For instance, if you wager $1 on even and $1 on black, you’ll win a $2 payout if the ball lands on black 10, and you’ll break even if it lands on red 16. Along with even/odd and red/black, which offer payouts of 1:1, outside bets include:[2]
The Martingale betting technique can be summed up as a method of playing against losses without capitalizing on wins. It is a negative flow strategy increasing bets because previous bets have lost. True, on far more occasions the player will win that $10 but it is inevitable that the devastating losing streak will happen. The saying “I have to win sooner or later,” should be changed to “I will get clobbered sooner or later.”
Roulette is one of the world’s favourite casino games for a reason. Deceptively simple and yet hard to master, it’s a game that reveals added layers of complexity the more you study it. In other words, if you think roulette involves little more than watching a little ball bounce its way around a wheel while randomly tossing chips at sections of the table, you don’t understand roulette. Sure, you can play it that way, but discerning players know better than that. Discerning players appreciate that there’s a right way and a wrong way to approach roulette.
Crossing off only four shows leaves you with a lot of chances to receive a show you've already seen, and it's hard not to feel like the selection process is rigged when you a) don't get to see the wheel actually spin and b) following along on social media shows that a majority of people see the same few shows: Kinky Boots, Waitress, Head Over Heels and The Prom. These are shows that you could easily pick up a discounted ticket to using BroadwayBox or purchasing last-minute on StubHub, if not directly from the box office, where tickets usually start around this price, anyway. For example, weekend tickets to The Prom start at $69, to Kinky Boots, $79, and to Head Over Heels, just $49.
If you want to go big but the straight bet gives you the cold sweats, you can still go for a higher reward with a lower risk and choose the split bet instead. This involves placing chips on any two numbers that are next to one another on the felt. This can be either horizontal or vertical placement, and to place the bet you put a chip on the line between the two numbers.
On an American wheel, there are 38 spots: numbers 1-36, plus 0 and 00.  Your odds of winning a one-number bet are 37 to 1 (37 ways to lose, 1 way to win).  But if you win, the casino doesn't pay you 37 to 1, they pay you less: 35 to 1.  The difference between the true odds and what they actually pay you is 2/38, or 5.26%.  You can do this same calculation for the other bets, and it comes out the same.
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