James Bond Roulette System – Used by Bond himself, not in any of the films, but in the written novels. This is a system that covers 2 thirds of the table, plus the 0. It could be described as another strategy to cover the table but due to it’s notoriety, we’ve given it it’s own page, complete with a diagram, examples and whey you shouldn’t use a progression.
Columns don’t contain consecutive numbers – for example, the first column has 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 16, 19, 22, 25, 28, and 31 – and the number of red and black numbers differs between each column, a fact that we’ll cover in a moment. And remember, the 0 and 00 aren’t included in any of the columns because they’re special and too good for all the other numbers.
The first time I tried Broadway Roulette we received tickets to Beautiful. Our tickets were in the back of the orchestra which I wasn't thrilled about, given that the theatre was mostly sort of empty, and that ticket prices at the box office started around what we'd paid for using the service. Similarly, my second experience garnered tickets to The Prom, which I loved, however the seats were in the mezzanine and, when all is said and done after the fees, the ticket price was very close to (if not more) the starting price for tickets to see that show in the same section.
Suppose you start with a $1 wager and lose 4 times in a row. So far, you’ve lost a total of $7 ($1 + $1 + $2 + $3 = $7). You win when you wager $5, so you get the original $5 bet back plus the $5 payout. Then, you'd count back 2 steps in the sequence from 5 and wager $2 in the next round. Lowering your wager every time you win helps protect your profits.
Dating back hundreds of years, roulette is one of the oldest gambling games. While the game is based on chance, strict probabilities are at the core of the game's spinning wheel. There are ways of playing the game wisely and minimizing your losses, but the game is structured to give the house an edge. With that in mind, be cautious about strategies that make unrealistic guarantees. Remember to gamble responsibly, if you're making wagers, and have fun trying your luck on the wheel!
But don’t get too comfortable here. If the $20 bet loses, the player will double that to $40. If that loses he goes up to $80. If that loses, he goes up to $160. If that loses, he puts up $320. If that loses he goes to $640. If that loses, he might be allowed to go to $1280 but many casinos limit the maximum a player can wager. That $1280 might be too much.
On an American wheel, there are 38 spots: numbers 1-36, plus 0 and 00.  Your odds of winning a one-number bet are 37 to 1 (37 ways to lose, 1 way to win).  But if you win, the casino doesn't pay you 37 to 1, they pay you less: 35 to 1.  The difference between the true odds and what they actually pay you is 2/38, or 5.26%.  You can do this same calculation for the other bets, and it comes out the same.
Now, on Broadway Roulette's website FAQ section, they say "We do not include any partial view seats in our mix". However, my friends got LAST ROW of orchestra. They were not only extremely far from the stage, but worse, whenever King Kong stood up, they could not even see his head because of the extreme mezzanine overhang. My friends ended up paying above average for their tickets but got some of the worst seats in the Broadway Theatre, arguably quite partial in view.
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