Stick to your profit goal and loss limit. When it comes to roulette and any other gambling game, you should only bet an amount that you know you can afford to lose. Once you've decided how much money you're willing to lose, stick to that amount and don't be tempted to bet any more. Things can get out of hand quickly, especially with a game that goes so fast.[5]
Step 2 is very easy. You need to break down your 24 chips in half, so you have two stacks of 12 chips. You then put one of the stacks of 12 on one of the dozens, and the other stack on another of the dozens. So you now have two out of the three dozen’s covered. If the ball lands in one of your dozens you will win 2-1 on your bet, so that will pay you 24 chips, plus the 12 from the winning bet will mean you now have a total of 36 chips.
Here's another way to look at it:  Let's say you bet $10 on every number, one bet on each of the 38 spots.  So you've just thrown down $380 in bets.  Only one of those numbers will win, and will pay 35 to 1, so you'll get back $360 (the $350 you won plus your original $10 bet on that number).  You bet a total of $380 but you walked away with only $360, so you lost $20.  That $20 you lost represents the house edge of 5.26% ($20 lost divided by the $380 that you bet; $20 ÷ $380 = 5.26%). 

Suppose you start with a $1 wager and lose 4 times in a row. So far, you’ve lost a total of $7 ($1 + $1 + $2 + $3 = $7). You win when you wager $5, so you get the original $5 bet back plus the $5 payout. Then, you'd count back 2 steps in the sequence from 5 and wager $2 in the next round. Lowering your wager every time you win helps protect your profits.
Travel the world – and I do mean the world – of casinos and you will find roulette games in just about every one of them. Yet, too many roulette books and guides offer information that is limited or uninformed or downright stupid; many advocating betting systems that cannot get the player the edge but worse, many of these systems cripple the player by making him or her bet more than he or she should. I intend to fix that with this roulette guide.

As you might guess, the wider the range, the lesser the payout you will receive. For example, if you chose to bet 1-18 and won, you would get even money on your bet. Subsequently, the tighter your range of numbers, the higher the payout you will receive. If you were to bet the two numbers like in our example, the payout would be 17:1, significantly higher.
Another example is expecting you’ll never see 37 different numbers appear in 37 spins. Firstly, it will happen just as often as any other sequence of 37 spins. So why would you favor one group of 37 numbers over another 37 numbers? There is no difference at all. Each spin is independent and with the same odds. It’s exactly the same as expecting to never see four reds in a row (RRRR). It may occur less often than a mixed sequence like BRRB or RBRB, but the odds of any specific sequence happening are exactly the same. So thinking one sequence is more rare than another is delusion.
Roulette games have minimum bets, which will be posted on a placard at the table.  Minimum bets work differently for inside bets (specific numbers) and outside bets (everything else).  For outside bets, any bet you make has to be at least the table minimum.  Inside bets can usually be as small as you like, as long as the total of all your inside bets is the table minimum.  For example, with a table minimum of $5, you could put $5 on #14, or $1 each on #14, #27, #8/9, #28/29/30, and #19/20/22/23.  Remember that you can bet inside or outside if you like; there's no requirement to bet both on a given spin. 

Here's another example: Since there are 38 slots on the wheel, we expect any given number to hit 1 out of 38 spins on average.  Now let's say you've been playing Roulette for a few hours, betting on Red every time, and you've been keeping track of what numbers have hit.  There have been 152 spins (4 x 38), and so we expect that each number should have come up 4 times on average.  You note, with some surprise, that #14 hasn't come up at all.  Does this mean that #14 is "due" and that you should bet on #14?  No.  Number 14 is not "due", no number is ever "due".  The wheel has no memory.
One of the coolest things about playing roulette is that there are tons of different and interesting ways you are able to place your bets. You can keep it simple and pick red or black, or odd or even, and just let the wheel do all of the work. If you’re looking for a little more risk and excitement, you have the options to bet individual numbers, combinations of numbers, or many other options. These options are more challenging to win, but the payouts reward you handsomely. This sort of flexibility makes roulette one of the most versatile and entertaining games offered in live or online casinos.
Some French tables will employ rules that generally help out the players. The "La Partage" and "En Prison" rules apply to outside even money bets like odds or even, black or red and low or high; they also apply when the ball lands in the zero slot. They are similar in the sense that players only lose half of their bet, but players cannot leave their bet on the table for another spin with the La Partage rule. If a player loses, they can collect half their bet in the En Prison rule, or leave half their bet on the table for the next spin with the La Partage rule.
One of the coolest things about playing roulette is that there are tons of different and interesting ways you are able to place your bets. You can keep it simple and pick red or black, or odd or even, and just let the wheel do all of the work. If you’re looking for a little more risk and excitement, you have the options to bet individual numbers, combinations of numbers, or many other options. These options are more challenging to win, but the payouts reward you handsomely. This sort of flexibility makes roulette one of the most versatile and entertaining games offered in live or online casinos.
Now, on Broadway Roulette's website FAQ section, they say "We do not include any partial view seats in our mix". However, my friends got LAST ROW of orchestra. They were not only extremely far from the stage, but worse, whenever King Kong stood up, they could not even see his head because of the extreme mezzanine overhang. My friends ended up paying above average for their tickets but got some of the worst seats in the Broadway Theatre, arguably quite partial in view.
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