Please Note: The Martingale is much like the iceberg that sunk the Titanic. The loss of six to eight hands in a row seems like a real longshot; but the fact is that anyone who has played roulette has seen streaks of red or black, odd or even, or high or low coming up with such frequency many times. Casinos put a cap on how much a person can bet so that such relatively short streaks can sink the Martingale player.
Whether you’ve never played roulette before or you are an experienced player returning to the action, our experts have put together a comprehensive guide to everything you need to know to be a master roulette player at the tables. We’ll cover the basics of how to play the game and expand into some more advanced concepts and explanations to get you ready!
Roulette is a simple game to play as long as the players follow the rules. This section will explain how the game works and what general types of bets can be made. This chapter is the primer for the entire game including the “inside” bets and “ outside proposition” bets; how to buy into a game; the purpose of the scoreboards and why the concept of a Horse’s Ass reflects itself in some workers. I’ll also show you how the numbers around the American and European roulette wheels are ordered in such a way that they do not reflect the betting layout. Then I’ll explain how the casino builds its edge at both the American and European game by using two distinct methods.
You can’t determine which number that ball will land on but you can determine the amount you’ll win when your bet comes in. The best players have a roulette strategy, which can range from the extremely simple to the surprisingly complex. Approaching roulette with a gameplan in mind makes sense as it’s a smart way to make the most of your money. Whether you choose to play conservatively or aggressively will depend on a number of factors including the level of profit you’re seeking and the level of risk you’re willing to expose yourself to. We’ve put together a guide to some of the best roulette playing strategies available.

On an American wheel, there are 38 spots: numbers 1-36, plus 0 and 00.  Your odds of winning a one-number bet are 37 to 1 (37 ways to lose, 1 way to win).  But if you win, the casino doesn't pay you 37 to 1, they pay you less: 35 to 1.  The difference between the true odds and what they actually pay you is 2/38, or 5.26%.  You can do this same calculation for the other bets, and it comes out the same.
Bet on the inside in moderation to increase your payout. Though they have the highest payout, straight bets on a single number are risky. The odds of the ball landing on the exact number you chose is 1 in 37 (2.7%) for European wheels and 1 in 38 (2.63%) for American wheels. In addition to making a straight bet on a single number, you can also divide the odds between multiple numbers.[3]
The history of the game begins more than 300 years ago, at the end of the 17th century, with Frenchman Blaise Pascal being credited with this invention. Apparently, he was trying to create a perpetual motion machine as he was studying probabilities, but the outcome took him by surprise. The roulette wheel gained a lot of traction relatively quickly and by the end of the century, it was a popular game in Paris.
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