This tip is so straightforward but is still extremely important to point out. You should never play a casino game or gamble until you completely understand and are comfortable with everything that is going on. Even as simple as roulette is, it’s important that you take the time to read up before playing. Once you’ve finished reading through this guide, you should be extremely comfortable with every aspect of the game and ready to try your luck.

Like most casino games, there are a few different variations of roulette that you will come across, depending on what part of the world you are in and what type of casino you are playing at. If you’re scared we’re about to complicate this easy-to-learn game, don’t worry; the differences in the variations of these games are extremely small but important enough to point out.


Before the game starts, players are instructed to place their bets. This is the time that you get to choose what you would like to wager on for the next spin. We will go over the different bet types and options available to you in depth later. Bets are made by placing your chips onto the felt in the area designated for the bet you would like to make.
This third best roulette bet was specifically designed for people who like to hedge their roulette bets, or at least attempt to. The Roulette board is an interesting creature and when studied thoroughly, it may help you score big bucks. On the third column of the board, there are 8 red numbers and 4 black, whereas the second column is reversed, holding 8 black numbers and 4 red.
Crossing off only four shows leaves you with a lot of chances to receive a show you've already seen, and it's hard not to feel like the selection process is rigged when you a) don't get to see the wheel actually spin and b) following along on social media shows that a majority of people see the same few shows: Kinky Boots, Waitress, Head Over Heels and The Prom. These are shows that you could easily pick up a discounted ticket to using BroadwayBox or purchasing last-minute on StubHub, if not directly from the box office, where tickets usually start around this price, anyway. For example, weekend tickets to The Prom start at $69, to Kinky Boots, $79, and to Head Over Heels, just $49.
First, note that while tickets are billed at just $59 on weekends, after the ticketing fee ($7) and the $10 upgrade to cross off two additional shows (something you'll want to do if you're a person who sees Broadway shows more often than just once in awhile) the ticket is closer to $79, which is what most shows (excluding the hyped productions like Hamilton, Springsteen, Dear Evan Hansen, Book of Mormon, etc.) start at, anyway.
Before you start casually throwing down chips and haphazardly betting on every spin of the wheel, take a moment to get acquainted with how roulette works. Whether you’re planning to play online or at a land-based casino, the basic rules governing roulette remain unchanged. With real world play however there’s also casino etiquette to consider. If you want to avoid being mistaken for a newb, knowing the informal rules of roulette is just as important as knowing the formal rules. First do your homework. Then play roulette, with the added confidence that comes from having a deep understanding of how it all works. We’ve assembled a detailed guide to playing roulette that covers all bases. It’ll help you take your roulette game to the next level.
Here's another way to look at it:  Let's say you bet $10 on every number, one bet on each of the 38 spots.  So you've just thrown down $380 in bets.  Only one of those numbers will win, and will pay 35 to 1, so you'll get back $360 (the $350 you won plus your original $10 bet on that number).  You bet a total of $380 but you walked away with only $360, so you lost $20.  That $20 you lost represents the house edge of 5.26% ($20 lost divided by the $380 that you bet; $20 ÷ $380 = 5.26%).
French Roulette is almost the same as European Roulette, except that the betting board is laid out in a different manner and there are a few small rules differences. These rules, known as the “La Partage” rule and the “en prison” rule, are optionally used in some casinos. These rules do have a more significant effect on gameplay, so if you are going to a casino that offers this variation, we recommend clicking below for more comprehensive details.
Due to the addition of an extra zero in American Roulette, the house edge is increased to an unfavorable 5.26% compared to its European counterpart. European Roulette has halved house edge due to its use of a single zero, making it 2.7%. If you’re a fan of American Roulette, by all means take a spin; but it’s good especially as a beginner to keep in mind that the house has a greater advantage of taking your money.
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