As we’ve mentioned several times already, roulette is probably the easiest game in the casino to learn how to play. A roulette table will always consist of a wheel, a small white ball, and a table printed with all of your betting options. You will also have a dealer present live in the casino, or an electronic dealer if you’re playing online. Each game will consist of a round of betting, and then the dealer will spin the wheel, drop in the white ball, and wait to see where it lands. The object of the game is to try to predict with your bets what number the white ball is going to land on. After each spin of the wheel, the game resets completely and starts over with a new round of betting.
Roulette is a simple game to play as long as the players follow the rules. This section will explain how the game works and what general types of bets can be made. This chapter is the primer for the entire game including the “inside” bets and “ outside proposition” bets; how to buy into a game; the purpose of the scoreboards and why the concept of a Horse’s Ass reflects itself in some workers. I’ll also show you how the numbers around the American and European roulette wheels are ordered in such a way that they do not reflect the betting layout. Then I’ll explain how the casino builds its edge at both the American and European game by using two distinct methods.
Yes! You can definitely find place online to play for high stakes. The important thing is to find a site that you feel very confident in that you can trust them with your money. With all of the shady practices that have been reported out there and because we feel that safety is so important, we wrote a page specifically about high stakes roulette and where to play at.

Stick to your profit goal and loss limit. When it comes to roulette and any other gambling game, you should only bet an amount that you know you can afford to lose. Once you've decided how much money you're willing to lose, stick to that amount and don't be tempted to bet any more. Things can get out of hand quickly, especially with a game that goes so fast.[5]
Try your hand at guessing the ball’s bounce. As the ball spins in the rim around the wheel, notice when it moves past a fixed point, such as the wheel's 0 pocket. Try to guess when the ball will slow down, fall from the rim, and start bouncing off of the deflectors that divide the wheel’s pockets. It’s difficult but, with practice, you may be able to guess which section of the wheel the ball will land after it stops bouncing.[10]

Their business model is setup to keep the business at the forefront of their decision making, rather than the customer. I won tickets to Chicago via their Instagram, which I was grateful for. However, because it was free, they wouldn't cross it off on my account which was quite disappointing. It is probably the least likely show I would want to see twice, so I would would have to cross of Chicago every time I saw a show diminishing the value provided by the company.


I am a roulette player. Neither an “editor” nor a “mathematician”. The difference is that I put my money where my mouth is. Most roulette sites are written by editors who have never placed a bet. They recycle knowledge and recite Wikipedia. And they are paid to write. I have paid dearly for every single word I write. I have invested money, time, aspirations and grey matter in roulette.


Please Note: The Martingale is much like the iceberg that sunk the Titanic. The loss of six to eight hands in a row seems like a real longshot; but the fact is that anyone who has played roulette has seen streaks of red or black, odd or even, or high or low coming up with such frequency many times. Casinos put a cap on how much a person can bet so that such relatively short streaks can sink the Martingale player.

Variations of games very similar to Roulette have been around for hundreds of years, therefore its exact origins are hard to trace. However, the version that we know and love today was devised by a French physicist, inventor and mathematician by the name of Blaise Pascal back in 1655. Of course, a game as seemingly complex as Roulette could only have been invented by a mad scientist – okay, he wasn’t really mad but he was a scientist. Pascal was trying to invent a perpetual motion machine – an experiment that failed in its original endeavor. For the non-science minded, a perpetual motion machine is a device that continues to operate without drawing energy from an outside source. A popular notion in the realm of “science” at the time. Though Pascal failed, he gave the world one of the most popular casino games in existence!


Please Note: The Martingale is much like the iceberg that sunk the Titanic. The loss of six to eight hands in a row seems like a real longshot; but the fact is that anyone who has played roulette has seen streaks of red or black, odd or even, or high or low coming up with such frequency many times. Casinos put a cap on how much a person can bet so that such relatively short streaks can sink the Martingale player.

Go with the Fibonacci System for a low-risk, low-reward strategy. In this system, you place wagers only on the roughly 50/50 bets (such as odd/even), and you base your wagers on the Fibonacci numbers. If you lose in the first round, make your next wager the next number in the Fibonacci sequence in the second round. Keep advancing a number in the sequence until you win then, when you do win, go back 2 numbers in the sequence.[13]


Are online casino games (also known as Internet games) safe? Many of the gambling sites are owned by large casino companies or big businesses that are not looking for controversy or quick cash. They are in the games for the long run, just as land-based casinos are. So compared to the Internet world of three decades ago you will find most of these sites to be honest. There are two ways to check the honesty of an Internet online casino site. If the site passes either of the two tests, or both of them, you can have confidence that you are probably getting a fair deal. It can never hurt to check out gambling sites.
The divisions around the wheel are numbered from 1 to 36 in a seemingly random pattern and alternate red and black. Additionally, there is a green division numbered 0. On American tables only there is a second extra green division marked 00 and it is largely this that makes the American version of Roulette a worse proposition financially than the European game.
Make sure that you are playing in a reputable casino – or on a site that gives you a chance to win by having the random number generating software. In a real casino you may not be able to use the systems that cover all possible outcomes but with some practice, a disciplined approach and a little bit of what every roulette player needs – luck – you could find that it becomes your new favourite game.
One way that you can ensure not to lose too much money – especially if you are playing online – is to concentrate on the outside bets. These bets only apply to boxes outside the numbered grid of the betting table and are for red or black, odd or even, or for groups of numbers either in rows or number bands. The odds are not as big but that means that there is more chance of winning.

French and some European Roulette tables also utilize what are known as French or called bets. These refer to certain sections of the Roulette table that represented by corresponding numbers and phrases on an ellipse. These are Voisin du zero, Orphelins and Tiers du Cylindre, and are based on a particular section’s proximity to zero. The numbers within the ellipse function in a similar manner.


I do not recommend Broadway Roulette. It seemed like it was going to be a great deal. When in reality, I ended up spending $79 per ticket for four of us. We were in the dead last row of the first balcony and saw "The Prom".  I should have known that what seemed like it was too good to be true...was too good to be true. Broadway Roulette informed me that the face value ticket price was $89. The price on the actual ticket was $57, and I paid $79. I only saved $10 per ticket on a show that I didn't particularly want to see in the first place, and had bad seats. You are better off going to the box office of the shows you really want to see the day of the performance.  But for someone that goes to a lot of shows and doesn't care what they see, or where they sit...maybe Broadway Roulette is for you.

My goal with this roulette strategy is to keep you away from the devastating loss that the Martingale ultimately entails. Plenty of times on the two spins that you sit out there will be a winning spin – had you bet it. More times there won’t. Remember the casino has that edge on all of those even-money wagers. That fact should always be front and center in your mind. Never think you are playing an even game even on bets called “even-money” bets.  


Now, on Broadway Roulette's website FAQ section, they say "We do not include any partial view seats in our mix". However, my friends got LAST ROW of orchestra. They were not only extremely far from the stage, but worse, whenever King Kong stood up, they could not even see his head because of the extreme mezzanine overhang. My friends ended up paying above average for their tickets but got some of the worst seats in the Broadway Theatre, arguably quite partial in view. 

This tip is so straightforward but is still extremely important to point out. You should never play a casino game or gamble until you completely understand and are comfortable with everything that is going on. Even as simple as roulette is, it’s important that you take the time to read up before playing. Once you’ve finished reading through this guide, you should be extremely comfortable with every aspect of the game and ready to try your luck.
Since there is a single zero slot on the European Roulette, manufacturers don’t need to make sure that it sits at the opposite side of the reel from any number. The rule still applies to same color numbers and consecutive ones, but the sequence is different and it goes like this, clockwise: 26, 3, 35, 12, 28, 7, 29, 18, 22, 9, 31, 14, 20, 1, 33, 16, 24, 5, 10, 23, 8, 30, 11, 36, 13, 27, 6, 34, 17, 25, 2, 21, 4, 19, 15, 32.
The odds of you winning will always be 50/50. So you have a 50% chance of LOSING $1, and a 50% chance of WINNING $0.50. You can’t just double bet size after losses, because then all you do is increase the amount you risk. Sure you may get lucky and win, but what happens if you lose? You’ll lose big. So there is no escaping the unfair payouts UNLESS you know which side of the coin is more likely to appear. Then you would be changing the odds of winning. And if you won much more often than 50% of the time, then the unfair payout wont matter as much.

One of the coolest things about playing roulette is that there are tons of different and interesting ways you are able to place your bets. You can keep it simple and pick red or black, or odd or even, and just let the wheel do all of the work. If you’re looking for a little more risk and excitement, you have the options to bet individual numbers, combinations of numbers, or many other options. These options are more challenging to win, but the payouts reward you handsomely. This sort of flexibility makes roulette one of the most versatile and entertaining games offered in live or online casinos.


Roulette games have minimum bets, which will be posted on a placard at the table.  Minimum bets work differently for inside bets (specific numbers) and outside bets (everything else).  For outside bets, any bet you make has to be at least the table minimum.  Inside bets can usually be as small as you like, as long as the total of all your inside bets is the table minimum.  For example, with a table minimum of $5, you could put $5 on #14, or $1 each on #14, #27, #8/9, #28/29/30, and #19/20/22/23.  Remember that you can bet inside or outside if you like; there's no requirement to bet both on a given spin.
I do not recommend Broadway Roulette. It seemed like it was going to be a great deal. When in reality, I ended up spending $79 per ticket for four of us. We were in the dead last row of the first balcony and saw "The Prom".  I should have known that what seemed like it was too good to be true...was too good to be true. Broadway Roulette informed me that the face value ticket price was $89. The price on the actual ticket was $57, and I paid $79. I only saved $10 per ticket on a show that I didn't particularly want to see in the first place, and had bad seats. You are better off going to the box office of the shows you really want to see the day of the performance.  But for someone that goes to a lot of shows and doesn't care what they see, or where they sit...maybe Broadway Roulette is for you.
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