All the betting strategies in this book and all the variations that individuals have created over the years to these betting strategies just can’t overcome the house edge. That edge is ingrained in the game. This chapter will explain how the casino shortchanges players on the odds or wins more decisions than the players. Short pays create the conundrum called casino odds versus true odds. An excellent way to manage your betting levels is to consolidate your bets.
For any complete novices out there, a roulette wheel is made up of 37 numbered pockets (or 38 if you are playing American roulette – and as an initial piece of advice you shouldn’t, as it decreases your chances of winning!). Half of these numbers are coloured red and half are black with the ‘0’ pocket green. A small ball is introduced when the wheel is spinning and players must predict where the ball will land.
The divisions around the wheel are numbered from 1 to 36 in a seemingly random pattern and alternate red and black. Additionally, there is a green division numbered 0. On American tables only there is a second extra green division marked 00 and it is largely this that makes the American version of Roulette a worse proposition financially than the European game.
Here's another way to look at it:  Let's say you bet $10 on every number, one bet on each of the 38 spots.  So you've just thrown down $380 in bets.  Only one of those numbers will win, and will pay 35 to 1, so you'll get back $360 (the $350 you won plus your original $10 bet on that number).  You bet a total of $380 but you walked away with only $360, so you lost $20.  That $20 you lost represents the house edge of 5.26% ($20 lost divided by the $380 that you bet; $20 ÷ $380 = 5.26%).
Keep in mind probability is a trend with no short-term guarantees. The real trick to roulette is to get lucky, then quit while you’re ahead. Every spin has a 1 in 37 (for European) or 1 in 38 (for American) chance of landing in a given pocket. Each spin is an individual trial with its own odds but, the longer you play, the more likely it is that you’ll fall into the probabilities that structure roulette.[9]
One of the coolest things about playing roulette is that there are tons of different and interesting ways you are able to place your bets. You can keep it simple and pick red or black, or odd or even, and just let the wheel do all of the work. If you’re looking for a little more risk and excitement, you have the options to bet individual numbers, combinations of numbers, or many other options. These options are more challenging to win, but the payouts reward you handsomely. This sort of flexibility makes roulette one of the most versatile and entertaining games offered in live or online casinos.
This betting option is one of the most diverse offered, with several different options. Basically, instead of just betting on one number, you have the option to bet on a group of numbers. This can be as wide of a range as 1-18 or 19-36, or as tight of a range as picking two numbers like 1 and 2. Ranges in between are also available for players to choose.
Casinos will normally post a maximum and a minimum stake for a roulette table and this is sometimes done for recreational play, too. Typically, for each spin of the wheel, if a player the total amount of a player's inside bets must exceed the minimum stake. The listed maximum stake usually shows only the maximum allowed for a single number "straight up" bet. The maximum stakes for other types of bet increases proportionately e.g. The maximum bet allowed for a pair of numbers is double the maximum straight-up bet, the maximum allowed for a corner bet is 4 times the straight up maximum and so on. So that really the limitation is on the amount that the casino can lose!
Know a bit about the D'Alembert strategy. A bit safer than the martingale and reverse martingale strategies, the D'Alembert strategy involves ramping up and down by arithmetic factors instead of geometric factors. That means, instead of doubling your bet when you lose (i.e. martingale), you increase your bet by 1 when you lose using the D'Alembert strategy.[5]
Honestly, the woman who helped me was nice, even though she sounded very fake. Said she was going to call me back by a certain time and never did. I had to call for her to tel me that they couldn't switch the show. I got beautiful, I already saw it. It's not good for locals, their options suck and they charge more to cross off more shows. Nice idea, but horribly executed
Columns don’t contain consecutive numbers – for example, the first column has 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 16, 19, 22, 25, 28, and 31 – and the number of red and black numbers differs between each column, a fact that we’ll cover in a moment. And remember, the 0 and 00 aren’t included in any of the columns because they’re special and too good for all the other numbers.

We got tickets to see The Prom. We paid $70 each with fees and the upgrade to remove two additional selections and ended up getting tickets on the mezzanine. The price on the ticket indicated $61 which I'm going to assume was BR's negotiated price as it appeared the same tickets would have been about $89 if we bought them ourselves. Not sure I would use this service again as I didn't think it represented that significant of a savings given you don't have control of what you are seeing. However if you are open to seeing anything and just want some inexpensive tickets this is a good way to do it.
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