Thanks to the advances of the internet, we now have several different options of how we can play our favorite casino games. As one of the most popular games out there, roulette can be found in almost any live casino and certainly on every online casino out there. While the game is exactly the same live and online, there are several differences that will lead to a bit of a different experience. Here are some of the pros and cons of each of the different ways to play.
If a 1:1 payout isn’t exciting enough to motivate you to lay down some chips, you can slightly up the ante and the payout to 2:1 by betting on the columns. By going with this second best roulette bet, you’re bringing your option of numbers down to a little under a third, but betting on a column still covers a significant chunk of the felt while doubling your winnings – a $10 bet will win you $20.

This third best roulette bet was specifically designed for people who like to hedge their roulette bets, or at least attempt to. The Roulette board is an interesting creature and when studied thoroughly, it may help you score big bucks. On the third column of the board, there are 8 red numbers and 4 black, whereas the second column is reversed, holding 8 black numbers and 4 red.
The D’Alembert system was invented by the 18th century French mathematician Jean-Baptiste le Rond d’Alembert and is perhaps the easiest of all Roulette strategies to apply. As a negative progression system, it involves you placing a bet, adding one unit to it if you lose, or removing a unit from it if you win, i.e. raise when you lose, lower when you win. Predicated on the idea of natural equilibrium, the D’Alembert strategy works best when applied to a set of even wins and losses for the same bet – but of course you won’t know what the Roulette wheel has in store for you until you start to play.

Although roulette is a game of chance you can give yourself a better chance of winning if you follow a strategy when it comes to what you bet on and how much. Newcomers will tend to concentrate on their lucky numbers and although that can work as part of a strategy – or just as a stroke of beginner’s luck – if you want to win more often than not you will have to have a better plan.


Dear Readers, I have spent many years studying roulette and have tested all the systems covered on this site except the biased wheel systems and the computers. None of the systems I have tested will win long term when played mechanically. Having said that, I do think it is better to use a system rather than just throwing chips on the table. Although, mathematically it probably doesn’t make that much difference. I feel better about my chances when I have a system that I’ve tested and I know what to expect. And that always includes the reality that I will lose on some of my trips. Try to limit your losses and capitalize on your wins. Easier said than done, I know. Maybe even impossible. Never bet more than you can afford to lose and have fun.
Casinos will normally post a maximum and a minimum stake for a roulette table and this is sometimes done for recreational play, too. Typically, for each spin of the wheel, if a player the total amount of a player's inside bets must exceed the minimum stake. The listed maximum stake usually shows only the maximum allowed for a single number "straight up" bet. The maximum stakes for other types of bet increases proportionately e.g. The maximum bet allowed for a pair of numbers is double the maximum straight-up bet, the maximum allowed for a corner bet is 4 times the straight up maximum and so on. So that really the limitation is on the amount that the casino can lose!
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The D’Alembert system was invented by the 18th century French mathematician Jean-Baptiste le Rond d’Alembert and is perhaps the easiest of all Roulette strategies to apply. As a negative progression system, it involves you placing a bet, adding one unit to it if you lose, or removing a unit from it if you win, i.e. raise when you lose, lower when you win. Predicated on the idea of natural equilibrium, the D’Alembert strategy works best when applied to a set of even wins and losses for the same bet – but of course you won’t know what the Roulette wheel has in store for you until you start to play.
Please Note: The Martingale is much like the iceberg that sunk the Titanic. The loss of six to eight hands in a row seems like a real longshot; but the fact is that anyone who has played roulette has seen streaks of red or black, odd or even, or high or low coming up with such frequency many times. Casinos put a cap on how much a person can bet so that such relatively short streaks can sink the Martingale player.
Realize your odds. At every roulette table (and at every game in the casino itself), the house always has an edge. All bets at both wheels (French or American) are paid at odds that would be true if only the 36 numbers were on the wheel. Their advantage comes from to 0 -- and the 00 in America.[5]There are theories as to how you can improve your odds, but they don't work. However, there are some variants that change how the favor lies:
A slightly different type of outside bets are those that pay 2-1 as the odds of winning are just 33%. The most popular version is on the Dozens, where players are supposed to bet on the first 12 numbers, the second or the third. The same goes for the Columns bet, with players being also expected to bet on 12 numbers, with the only difference being the distribution on the betting grid. All outside bet are clearly defined on the roulette table with specific places for each bet.
As you’ve seen, the rules of Roulette are really quite simple. Now that you’re caught up with the history and basics of the game, let’s go over betting! Real Money Roulette tables have their own chips, and players are designated different colored chips so the croupier will know who to pay and who to take. Each table also will have a minimum bet posted.
This roulette strategy is the equivalent of a YANS and it might even be more wild and crazy than that. It is based upon the assertion that a chaotic betting system can overcome the chaos of randomness. Two wrongs make a right; that kind of thing. Two wrongs don’t make a right and chaos versus chaos is just, well, chaos versus chaos, as you shall see.
When you see that guy at the roulette table expertly throwing the chips down, he’s most likely using the Martingale Strategy. This method depends on doubling your bets after you take a loss, with the goal of recouping all previous losses and gaining a small profit. In other words, if you place your wagers only on a single color and continue doubling them until you win, you recover your losses. This is provided you keep doubling losing bets.

At a first glance, there is no difference between the French and European Roulette, as the wheels have the same layout and numbers are arranged in the same sequence. The only difference between the two games is that French Roulette has two special rules which go by the name of “En Prison” and “La Partage”. The first kicks in when the ball lands on zero and as explained above, players won’t lose the wager, instead they will have a second chance to make a correct prediction. The “La Partage” also helps those who use the even money bet recuperate half of their investment, as 50% of their wager will be instantly refunded if the ball lands on 0.


Making a bet is easy:  just place your chip(s) on the number(s), color, or sets you want to bet on.  For most bets it's fairly obvious—you can't miss the Red diamond for Red bets, and things like Even, 1-18, and 1st 12 are written out in plain English.  I've added blue circled letters to the picture below to point out how to make the not-so-obvious bets (the sets of 2-6 numbers). Here are the different bets you can make and the payouts for those bets.
You don’t have to be a mathematical genius to excel at roulette but it makes sense to memorise the sort of odds you’ll receive for different bets. Although it’s unlikely that a croupier will make a mistake and underpay you, if you don’t know the odds of the bet you’ve placed, how are you supposed to correct them? Even if you’re only playing online roulette, it still pays to familiarise yourself with the odds you’ll receive for betting on different sections of the table. That way you’ll be able to calculate the possible return and can adjust your strategy accordingly. If you don’t know the difference between zero and double-zero roulette for instance, you don’t know how to calculate your odds and you’re just guessing. Don’t guess – calculate. We’ll show you how.

If real wheels isn’t your thing, by far your best option is Betvoyager’s No-zero roulette. Basically the wheel has no house edge, so during the game the casino has no advantage over you. The only catch is when you win, you pay 10% of winnings to the casino. See the image below and you’ll notice there’s no zero on the table. See a detailed review of here.
Being organised is a good trait when it comes to roulette. Another one of the roulette betting tips that uses this to good effect is the La Bouchere system. Here you decide how much you want to win – let’s say 30 chips – and split the amount into sections: 4, 8, 6, 4, 6, 2. You take the numbers on the outside – here it would be 4 and 2 – and add them together to make your stake. You then bet on one of the 50:50 outside bets such as even. Repeat this until you have used all your chips. If any of the bets don’t win you add the total stake to one of the ends and bet as before. The system predicts that you should be able to end up with your desired amount of winnings. And that is when you leave the table before you discard the system and bet uncontrollably!
Since there is a single zero slot on the European Roulette, manufacturers don’t need to make sure that it sits at the opposite side of the reel from any number. The rule still applies to same color numbers and consecutive ones, but the sequence is different and it goes like this, clockwise: 26, 3, 35, 12, 28, 7, 29, 18, 22, 9, 31, 14, 20, 1, 33, 16, 24, 5, 10, 23, 8, 30, 11, 36, 13, 27, 6, 34, 17, 25, 2, 21, 4, 19, 15, 32.
Leonardo of Pisa, also known as Fibonacci, was a famous Italian mathematician who wrote about a specific series of numbers in the early 1200’s. While the series was around over a thousand years before Fibonacci, the series was dubbed the “Fibonacci sequence” in the nineteenth century. Basically, the sequence is characterized by the fact that every number after the first two is the sum of the two preceding ones. So, the Fibonacci go like this: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, etc.
Honestly, the woman who helped me was nice, even though she sounded very fake. Said she was going to call me back by a certain time and never did. I had to call for her to tel me that they couldn't switch the show. I got beautiful, I already saw it. It's not good for locals, their options suck and they charge more to cross off more shows. Nice idea, but horribly executed
Before the game starts, players are instructed to place their bets. This is the time that you get to choose what you would like to wager on for the next spin. We will go over the different bet types and options available to you in depth later. Bets are made by placing your chips onto the felt in the area designated for the bet you would like to make.
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