Although roulette is a game of chance you can give yourself a better chance of winning if you follow a strategy when it comes to what you bet on and how much. Newcomers will tend to concentrate on their lucky numbers and although that can work as part of a strategy – or just as a stroke of beginner’s luck – if you want to win more often than not you will have to have a better plan.
Very quickly the bet size increases. Is there any scientific and viable reason why red would spin next? No. And even if there was, this strategy certainly doesn’t consider it. Simply the odds of red and black spinning are always the same. It doesn’t matter even if you had 100 blacks in a row. The odds of red or black spinning next don’t change. Intermediate players may understand this, but they are stuck thinking that eventually they are due to win. The fact is eventually you will win, but this doesn’t mean you will profit. Why is explained below.
Roulette is one of the world’s favourite casino games for a reason. Deceptively simple and yet hard to master, it’s a game that reveals added layers of complexity the more you study it. In other words, if you think roulette involves little more than watching a little ball bounce its way around a wheel while randomly tossing chips at sections of the table, you don’t understand roulette. Sure, you can play it that way, but discerning players know better than that. Discerning players appreciate that there’s a right way and a wrong way to approach roulette.
Some French tables will employ rules that generally help out the players. The "La Partage" and "En Prison" rules apply to outside even money bets like odds or even, black or red and low or high; they also apply when the ball lands in the zero slot. They are similar in the sense that players only lose half of their bet, but players cannot leave their bet on the table for another spin with the La Partage rule. If a player loses, they can collect half their bet in the En Prison rule, or leave half their bet on the table for the next spin with the La Partage rule.
The D’Alembert system was invented by the 18th century French mathematician Jean-Baptiste le Rond d’Alembert and is perhaps the easiest of all Roulette strategies to apply. As a negative progression system, it involves you placing a bet, adding one unit to it if you lose, or removing a unit from it if you win, i.e. raise when you lose, lower when you win. Predicated on the idea of natural equilibrium, the D’Alembert strategy works best when applied to a set of even wins and losses for the same bet – but of course you won’t know what the Roulette wheel has in store for you until you start to play.

Roulette Assault – This is from the same person that designed Roulette Sniper. It’s an automated betting software that plays automatically to the settings provided by the user. While it’s unlikely to win any meaningful money over the long term, it is much better than Roulette Sniper and can be used for testing a limited set of systems that it’s coded with.
Step 2 is very easy. You need to break down your 24 chips in half, so you have two stacks of 12 chips. You then put one of the stacks of 12 on one of the dozens, and the other stack on another of the dozens. So you now have two out of the three dozen’s covered. If the ball lands in one of your dozens you will win 2-1 on your bet, so that will pay you 24 chips, plus the 12 from the winning bet will mean you now have a total of 36 chips.
While I ultimately enjoyed both shows I wound up seeing through the service, I feel that it is not beneficial for someone who sees shows more often than once or twice per year. It is not exactly the great deal you are hoping for when you are first enticed by the flashy weekend promise of a $59 ticket, and if you keep up-to-date with Broadway news (which is likely how you found out about the service in the first place) you will already know about underrated/new shows on Broadway.
The Martingale betting technique can be summed up as a method of playing against losses without capitalizing on wins. It is a negative flow strategy increasing bets because previous bets have lost. True, on far more occasions the player will win that $10 but it is inevitable that the devastating losing streak will happen. The saying “I have to win sooner or later,” should be changed to “I will get clobbered sooner or later.”

Despite appearances, the rules of Roulette are actually quite simple. Standard Roulette consists of a spinning wheel, a betting table, a ceramic ball spun by a croupier, and a series of wager options available to each player. Before each round, simply place your wager in chips on the Roulette table, and watch the croupier spin the wheel with the Roulette ball in motion in the opposite direction. Eventually, the ball will slow down and land in a numbered pocket. If the wager you made matches the ball’s final destination, congratulations you are a winner! If not, spin again and see what the tides of fortune have in store for you.

The D’Alembert system was invented by the 18th century French mathematician Jean-Baptiste le Rond d’Alembert and is perhaps the easiest of all Roulette strategies to apply. As a negative progression system, it involves you placing a bet, adding one unit to it if you lose, or removing a unit from it if you win, i.e. raise when you lose, lower when you win. Predicated on the idea of natural equilibrium, the D’Alembert strategy works best when applied to a set of even wins and losses for the same bet – but of course you won’t know what the Roulette wheel has in store for you until you start to play.
Perhaps the most popular roulette bet of all is the Red or Black wager, which pays even money and allows players to bet on either color. If the player wins he will keep the initial state and receive an equal amount. Odd or Even has the same payout ratio, the only difference being the fact that players bet on old and even numbers. The High or Low is also an even money bet is the one on numbers ranging from 1 to 18 or 19 to 36 and in all these roulette bets, the house extract its edge from the zero slot.
If real wheels isn’t your thing, by far your best option is Betvoyager’s No-zero roulette. Basically the wheel has no house edge, so during the game the casino has no advantage over you. The only catch is when you win, you pay 10% of winnings to the casino. See the image below and you’ll notice there’s no zero on the table. See a detailed review of here.
I would use a Martingale only on the even-money outside bets at roulette, the odd or even, high or low, red or black. These bets give the player 18 chances to win with 20 chances to lose on the American double-zero wheels and 18 chances to win with 19 chances to lose on the European Roulette (single-zero wheels). Obviously, if you can play the European wheel that is the preferred one as long as the betting ranges fit your bankroll.
French Roulette is almost the same as European Roulette, except that the betting board is laid out in a different manner and there are a few small rules differences. These rules, known as the “La Partage” rule and the “en prison” rule, are optionally used in some casinos. These rules do have a more significant effect on gameplay, so if you are going to a casino that offers this variation, we recommend clicking below for more comprehensive details.
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