A slightly different type of outside bets are those that pay 2-1 as the odds of winning are just 33%. The most popular version is on the Dozens, where players are supposed to bet on the first 12 numbers, the second or the third. The same goes for the Columns bet, with players being also expected to bet on 12 numbers, with the only difference being the distribution on the betting grid. All outside bet are clearly defined on the roulette table with specific places for each bet.
You now have 90 chips from your initial $20 buy-in, so you are doing well. But there is one final step that can improve your winnings even more. Now we are going to bet straight up bets, the highest paying bet on the Roulette wheel. So for this you need to break your 90 chips down into 22 stacks of 4 chips (total 88 chips) and you will have 2 left over for insurance.
We got tickets to see The Prom. We paid $70 each with fees and the upgrade to remove two additional selections and ended up getting tickets on the mezzanine. The price on the ticket indicated $61 which I'm going to assume was BR's negotiated price as it appeared the same tickets would have been about $89 if we bought them ourselves. Not sure I would use this service again as I didn't think it represented that significant of a savings given you don't have control of what you are seeing. However if you are open to seeing anything and just want some inexpensive tickets this is a good way to do it.
Please Note: The Martingale is much like the iceberg that sunk the Titanic. The loss of six to eight hands in a row seems like a real longshot; but the fact is that anyone who has played roulette has seen streaks of red or black, odd or even, or high or low coming up with such frequency many times. Casinos put a cap on how much a person can bet so that such relatively short streaks can sink the Martingale player. 

You will either have a positive or negative edge, and waiting for something to happen like a sequence of numbers will not improve your chances of winning. The exception is if the “trigger” is directly related to a sequence of spins caused by physical variables of the wheel and ball. For example, if the trigger was “bet on whatever number that won most in 10,000 spins”, then this is bias analysis. But the “triggers” that have no effect are like “wait for 5 reds in a row then bet black”.
Variations of games very similar to Roulette have been around for hundreds of years, therefore its exact origins are hard to trace. However, the version that we know and love today was devised by a French physicist, inventor and mathematician by the name of Blaise Pascal back in 1655. Of course, a game as seemingly complex as Roulette could only have been invented by a mad scientist – okay, he wasn’t really mad but he was a scientist. Pascal was trying to invent a perpetual motion machine – an experiment that failed in its original endeavor. For the non-science minded, a perpetual motion machine is a device that continues to operate without drawing energy from an outside source. A popular notion in the realm of “science” at the time. Though Pascal failed, he gave the world one of the most popular casino games in existence!
The purpose of roulette is to try to predict the outcome of where the white ball will land on each spin of the wheel. If we could only try to guess what number that was, the game would be a bit boring, as there would be no variety and it would get way too repetitive. Fortunately, the designers of the game have built in tons of betting options to make the game much more exciting, versatile, and downright fun. Let’s take a look at a few of the different categories of bets you can make. 

Some French tables will employ rules that generally help out the players. The "La Partage" and "En Prison" rules apply to outside even money bets like odds or even, black or red and low or high; they also apply when the ball lands in the zero slot. They are similar in the sense that players only lose half of their bet, but players cannot leave their bet on the table for another spin with the La Partage rule. If a player loses, they can collect half their bet in the En Prison rule, or leave half their bet on the table for the next spin with the La Partage rule.

Although roulette is a game of chance you can give yourself a better chance of winning if you follow a strategy when it comes to what you bet on and how much. Newcomers will tend to concentrate on their lucky numbers and although that can work as part of a strategy – or just as a stroke of beginner’s luck – if you want to win more often than not you will have to have a better plan.
A slightly different type of outside bets are those that pay 2-1 as the odds of winning are just 33%. The most popular version is on the Dozens, where players are supposed to bet on the first 12 numbers, the second or the third. The same goes for the Columns bet, with players being also expected to bet on 12 numbers, with the only difference being the distribution on the betting grid. All outside bet are clearly defined on the roulette table with specific places for each bet.

Stick to your profit goal and loss limit. When it comes to roulette and any other gambling game, you should only bet an amount that you know you can afford to lose. Once you've decided how much money you're willing to lose, stick to that amount and don't be tempted to bet any more. Things can get out of hand quickly, especially with a game that goes so fast.[5]
The first time I tried Broadway Roulette we received tickets to Beautiful. Our tickets were in the back of the orchestra which I wasn't thrilled about, given that the theatre was mostly sort of empty, and that ticket prices at the box office started around what we'd paid for using the service. Similarly, my second experience garnered tickets to The Prom, which I loved, however the seats were in the mezzanine and, when all is said and done after the fees, the ticket price was very close to (if not more) the starting price for tickets to see that show in the same section.
The D’Alembert system was invented by the 18th century French mathematician Jean-Baptiste le Rond d’Alembert and is perhaps the easiest of all Roulette strategies to apply. As a negative progression system, it involves you placing a bet, adding one unit to it if you lose, or removing a unit from it if you win, i.e. raise when you lose, lower when you win. Predicated on the idea of natural equilibrium, the D’Alembert strategy works best when applied to a set of even wins and losses for the same bet – but of course you won’t know what the Roulette wheel has in store for you until you start to play.
In North America and the Caribbean, roulette wheels have a double zero, and all bets (except a direct bet on the selected zero) are lost when either zero turns up. The result is significantly poorer odds for the punter and an increase in the Casino's cut. This is probably why in this region, Roulette is less popular than it is in other parts of the world.
Do you know the difference between a Corner and a Straight Up Bet? How about a Six Line or Street? These are all terms for popular roulette bets and there’s plenty more where that came from. Learn the lingo and learn the types of roulette bets available to you. It’s a smart way of improving your roulette playing and will allow you to approach the game in a more calculating manner, one that will allow you to make your chips go further. Our guide to roulette betting will tell you everything you need to know about the many types of bets at your disposal.
Broadway Roulette is for people who consistently watch Broadway shows and are ok with getting tickets to mediocre shows. I used this service for my husbands birthday and he was not happy. If you want to see a Broadway show my advice is to pay the money you would have paid to Ticketmaster/etc. that way you are not left paying for tickets that are not worth it. When I got my tickets the rate on the ticket was $49pp when you pay Broadway Roulette it's $69pp. We got tickets to Frankie and Johnnie. It wasn't a show we were familiar with and did not enjoy it at all. We are a young couple in our early 30s and this show is for older couples. We didn't get a lot of the references in the show. I wouldn't do this again. I would rather spend the extra $30 and see a show I would enjoy!!
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