A slightly more complex betting strategy, this system is based on the famous Fibonnaci sequence – 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, and so on, with each number being the sum of the previous two numbers. This sequence of numbers was conceived by the 13th century Italian mathematician Leonardo Pisano Bigollo, who first brought the Arabic numeral system to the west. To apply it to roulette, start your play with a real money online casino bet, and then simply apply this sequence with a matching bet increase every time you lose. Let’s say for example you bet $1. If you lose your bet, next time round you’ll bet $2 – then you’ll go from $2 to $3, $3 to $5, and up the rest of the sequence. Should you win your first bet, you’ll start again at $1. If you win further down the sequence, cross off the last two numbers at the point where you began to win, and start from the next one. The theory underpinning the system is that each lost bet will be recouped by betting the lost amount on the next wager, covering consecutive losses by moving up and down the numerical sequence. While a viable theory, like the Martingale, you could end up blowing your bankroll if you hit a solid losing streak. 

Yes, there are now plenty of online casino sites that offer real games as in r-e-a-l games! That’s right, you will have a live dealer spinning that real roulette ball and calling out the winners. A live dealer. A person. These are real games. It is important to carefully manage your money while playing casino games in your home as there can be (for some) a tendency to overdo it. Don’t let yourself become numb!
This is not a system for bet selection. It is just a betting progression where you double bet size after losses. Remember the wheel doesn’t care about your bet size. The odds don’t change. All you do with the Martingale is change bet size on different spins. Even when you win, you’ll still be paid an unfair amount. You can do well for a while, but eventually you’ll reach the maximum table bet and losses will rapidly compound.
The three variations of roulette are all extremely similar, with a few small differences. American Roulette is the only version that has a single and a double zero slot on the wheel. This puts the player at a slightly worse disadvantage. European and French Roulette are nearly identical, with only the single zero slot on the wheel. French roulette does have a few slight rule variations that you should scroll up and read about if you happen to be playing somewhere that offers it.
As we’ve mentioned several times already, roulette is probably the easiest game in the casino to learn how to play. A roulette table will always consist of a wheel, a small white ball, and a table printed with all of your betting options. You will also have a dealer present live in the casino, or an electronic dealer if you’re playing online. Each game will consist of a round of betting, and then the dealer will spin the wheel, drop in the white ball, and wait to see where it lands. The object of the game is to try to predict with your bets what number the white ball is going to land on. After each spin of the wheel, the game resets completely and starts over with a new round of betting.
Those of you have gambled in a casino, even only a few times, have probably stumbled on the Martingale system, even if you didn’t know the word Martingale. You might have even figured you invented it. I know I did. It seems this is the very first concept most gamblers have and it is expressed in the following phrase: “I have to win sooner or later, right?” 
The first time I tried Broadway Roulette we received tickets to Beautiful. Our tickets were in the back of the orchestra which I wasn't thrilled about, given that the theatre was mostly sort of empty, and that ticket prices at the box office started around what we'd paid for using the service. Similarly, my second experience garnered tickets to The Prom, which I loved, however the seats were in the mezzanine and, when all is said and done after the fees, the ticket price was very close to (if not more) the starting price for tickets to see that show in the same section.
Roulette – in movies, on TV, and in literature, it’s often depicted as glamorous, exciting, and ridiculously lucrative for whichever character is playing. While winning big at the spinning wheel seems like a fantasy reserved for James Bond and other fictional high rollers, it is possible to minimize risk and win big at the same time by knowing the best roulette bets. It all comes down to the numbers, and how you want to play them.
My goal with this roulette strategy is to keep you away from the devastating loss that the Martingale ultimately entails. Plenty of times on the two spins that you sit out there will be a winning spin – had you bet it. More times there won’t. Remember the casino has that edge on all of those even-money wagers. That fact should always be front and center in your mind. Never think you are playing an even game even on bets called “even-money” bets.  

Roulette is one of the world’s favourite casino games for a reason. Deceptively simple and yet hard to master, it’s a game that reveals added layers of complexity the more you study it. In other words, if you think roulette involves little more than watching a little ball bounce its way around a wheel while randomly tossing chips at sections of the table, you don’t understand roulette. Sure, you can play it that way, but discerning players know better than that. Discerning players appreciate that there’s a right way and a wrong way to approach roulette.


Bonuses may sound great, but they always come with strings that ultimately benefit the casino. If you are a professional player, never accept a deposit bonus because it will limit what you can do. For example, you may have won a fortune on a wheel, then it gets changed by the casino. But you may not be able to withdraw funds until you have wagered a certain amount. And doing so may erode your profits.

You don’t have to be a mathematical genius to excel at roulette but it makes sense to memorise the sort of odds you’ll receive for different bets. Although it’s unlikely that a croupier will make a mistake and underpay you, if you don’t know the odds of the bet you’ve placed, how are you supposed to correct them? Even if you’re only playing online roulette, it still pays to familiarise yourself with the odds you’ll receive for betting on different sections of the table. That way you’ll be able to calculate the possible return and can adjust your strategy accordingly. If you don’t know the difference between zero and double-zero roulette for instance, you don’t know how to calculate your odds and you’re just guessing. Don’t guess – calculate. We’ll show you how.
If you’re playing at a table live in the casino or online with multiple players, you can imagine that it is important to keep track of whose bets are where. For this reason, casinos will exchange your money for colored chips to keep track of your bets. For example, if there are three players at a table, one player might have red chips, one might have yellow chips, and one might have purple chips. This makes it very easy for you and the dealers to know whose bet belongs to whom.
Hi, how about silverthorne publication, they seem to have different name system of games a few month all the time. for example, they come out with a system called checkmate roullett, iron roulette, attack baccarat, power baccarat, etc. I am on their email list and I got this all the time but I don’t know if they are just selling the system or is their system really work?
If you’re like most players, your strategy would be to use a trigger, then betting progression. A trigger is simply an event you wait to occur before betting. For example, the trigger may be wait for 3 REDS to spin in a row. Your bet would then be doubling bet size until you win. But again this wont work because the odds haven’t changed, the payouts are the same, and all you’re doing is making difference size bets on independent spins.
Bet on the inside in moderation to increase your payout. Though they have the highest payout, straight bets on a single number are risky. The odds of the ball landing on the exact number you chose is 1 in 37 (2.7%) for European wheels and 1 in 38 (2.63%) for American wheels. In addition to making a straight bet on a single number, you can also divide the odds between multiple numbers.[3]
7. Everything in roulette is long term, unless you have detailed data that accounts for why the ball lands where it does (like dominant diamond, rotor speed, ball bounce). You cannot possibly test a system properly from a few minutes or even weeks of play. Proper testing requires months, otherwise a loss or win can be plain good or bad luck. So for proper testing to be practical, you need at least 50,000 recorded spins from a real wheel. The only exception is if you have supporting information to back up results, like dominant diamond, rotor speed, ball bounce (so you can plainly see all factors contributing to where the ball lands).
Broadway Roulette is for people who consistently watch Broadway shows and are ok with getting tickets to mediocre shows. I used this service for my husbands birthday and he was not happy. If you want to see a Broadway show my advice is to pay the money you would have paid to Ticketmaster/etc. that way you are not left paying for tickets that are not worth it. When I got my tickets the rate on the ticket was $49pp when you pay Broadway Roulette it's $69pp. We got tickets to Frankie and Johnnie. It wasn't a show we were familiar with and did not enjoy it at all. We are a young couple in our early 30s and this show is for older couples. We didn't get a lot of the references in the show. I wouldn't do this again. I would rather spend the extra $30 and see a show I would enjoy!!

So what were some of the most famous systems used by our ancestors in attempting to beat the wheel? Are any of these still used today when people are learning how to play roulette? I can easily answer both of these questions, with the latter first: Yes! the systems of the past are still used today. Why? Because they are fun to play and structure a player’s game-plan in a way that makes sense to the player. A player always knows what to do next when playing a system. There’s no guesswork in how or what to do next.
I am a roulette player. Neither an “editor” nor a “mathematician”. The difference is that I put my money where my mouth is. Most roulette sites are written by editors who have never placed a bet. They recycle knowledge and recite Wikipedia. And they are paid to write. I have paid dearly for every single word I write. I have invested money, time, aspirations and grey matter in roulette.
Here’s why: the third column contains more red numbers than any other column, giving yourself a good chunk of red on the wheel. At the same time, you’re betting on black, which gives you a little under half the wheel. The third column has a payout of 2:1, and the black has a payout of 1:1, so your column bet should be half the black bet to break even. This is because if a red number shows up on the third column, you win double your bet, but lose your black bet, which is the same amount – it’s considered a push, since you’re even. It’s the same when a black number comes up: you win your black bet, but lose your column bet. But when a black number on the third column comes up, you pull ahead. This system of betting minimizes the risk while giving you a solid chance of steadily padding your bankroll.
Now with your 72 chips, you need to break them down into 14 stacks of 5 chips. The next bets you are going to cover are the splits, so place your bets on 14 different split bets and make sure that you do not double up on any numbers so you can cover as much of the table as possible. You will have 2 chips left over when you do this, so place these 2 chips straight up on any of the empty numbers as a kind of insurance.
Those of you have gambled in a casino, even only a few times, have probably stumbled on the Martingale system, even if you didn’t know the word Martingale. You might have even figured you invented it. I know I did. It seems this is the very first concept most gamblers have and it is expressed in the following phrase: “I have to win sooner or later, right?” 
Another strategy that is good for more wary players is one known as the Paroli system. Here you make an initial bet of say £10 and if it loses you repeat the stake for the next spin. When your bet wins you double your stake for the next game and so on. If you then win three games in a row you should return back to your original stake. The thinking behind this system is that your luck will run out so it reigns in any outlandish bets before you get carried away.
Before the game starts, players are instructed to place their bets. This is the time that you get to choose what you would like to wager on for the next spin. We will go over the different bet types and options available to you in depth later. Bets are made by placing your chips onto the felt in the area designated for the bet you would like to make.
The D’Alembert system was invented by the 18th century French mathematician Jean-Baptiste le Rond d’Alembert and is perhaps the easiest of all Roulette strategies to apply. As a negative progression system, it involves you placing a bet, adding one unit to it if you lose, or removing a unit from it if you win, i.e. raise when you lose, lower when you win. Predicated on the idea of natural equilibrium, the D’Alembert strategy works best when applied to a set of even wins and losses for the same bet – but of course you won’t know what the Roulette wheel has in store for you until you start to play.
To sellers who disagree with reviews: This website exists to protect people from scams, NOT to harm you or anyone. If you receive an unfair review, contact me with details and I’ll gladly publicly apologize and amend material if mistakes have been made. Don’t just publish nonsense to attack me. Really I’m an honest person and want truth to be told. Unfortunately attacking me is the typical response, because scammers know they can’t substantiate claims and just want “revenge”. My systems are legitimate “advantage play” even acknowledged by casinos as effective. If you just prefer to attack me anyway, at least try to present honest information. And if you ever need proof my systems are as I claim, contact me and I’ll gladly provide clear proof (including government lab test results, other lab test results, TV documentaries, news articles, scientific journals and more).
Broadway Roulette is for people who consistently watch Broadway shows and are ok with getting tickets to mediocre shows. I used this service for my husbands birthday and he was not happy. If you want to see a Broadway show my advice is to pay the money you would have paid to Ticketmaster/etc. that way you are not left paying for tickets that are not worth it. When I got my tickets the rate on the ticket was $49pp when you pay Broadway Roulette it's $69pp. We got tickets to Frankie and Johnnie. It wasn't a show we were familiar with and did not enjoy it at all. We are a young couple in our early 30s and this show is for older couples. We didn't get a lot of the references in the show. I wouldn't do this again. I would rather spend the extra $30 and see a show I would enjoy!!

Beginners should stick to betting outside the table. Though the profits may not be as large, they are statistically more consistent. Betting red or black, high or low, and odd or even ensures a lower probability of losing money, as all of these bets pay out even money. Straight bets are a long shot, and consistent outside betting yields more return in the long term.
A slightly different type of outside bets are those that pay 2-1 as the odds of winning are just 33%. The most popular version is on the Dozens, where players are supposed to bet on the first 12 numbers, the second or the third. The same goes for the Columns bet, with players being also expected to bet on 12 numbers, with the only difference being the distribution on the betting grid. All outside bet are clearly defined on the roulette table with specific places for each bet.
As an off-topic point, I was also put-off by a post I read on their website blog about what a theatre goer should and should not wear to the theatre. While the main point of the article was not to wear denim cutoffs to the show, they also bizarrely and randomly listed a number of other things patrons "shouldn't" wear, including vintage jeans, old logo t-shirts (something that, if the writer was actually as trendy as she smugly purported to be, she might know are back in style and can be dressed up quite nicely under a cool jacket or layered necklace) and leggings. For a brand that capitalizes wildly on "making Broadway accessible to everyone," it came off grossly classist and policing of what I can only assume is its target demographic --- young people on a budget.  

The D’Alembert system was invented by the 18th century French mathematician Jean-Baptiste le Rond d’Alembert and is perhaps the easiest of all Roulette strategies to apply. As a negative progression system, it involves you placing a bet, adding one unit to it if you lose, or removing a unit from it if you win, i.e. raise when you lose, lower when you win. Predicated on the idea of natural equilibrium, the D’Alembert strategy works best when applied to a set of even wins and losses for the same bet – but of course you won’t know what the Roulette wheel has in store for you until you start to play.
Broadway Roulette is for people who consistently watch Broadway shows and are ok with getting tickets to mediocre shows. I used this service for my husbands birthday and he was not happy. If you want to see a Broadway show my advice is to pay the money you would have paid to Ticketmaster/etc. that way you are not left paying for tickets that are not worth it. When I got my tickets the rate on the ticket was $49pp when you pay Broadway Roulette it's $69pp. We got tickets to Frankie and Johnnie. It wasn't a show we were familiar with and did not enjoy it at all. We are a young couple in our early 30s and this show is for older couples. We didn't get a lot of the references in the show. I wouldn't do this again. I would rather spend the extra $30 and see a show I would enjoy!!
To be clear, Bovada's not perfect.  Once they got duped by a vendor (Betsoft) who provided progressive slots whose jackpots weren't winnable.  When I discovered this I alerted Bovada, and they pulled all the Betsoft games from the site, but I thought they were slow to do so and didn't offer proper restitution to affected players.  Still, even with this incident, their overall history is better than most; as just one example, there are many other casinos still offering Betsoft's questionable games.
You can’t determine which number that ball will land on but you can determine the amount you’ll win when your bet comes in. The best players have a roulette strategy, which can range from the extremely simple to the surprisingly complex. Approaching roulette with a gameplan in mind makes sense as it’s a smart way to make the most of your money. Whether you choose to play conservatively or aggressively will depend on a number of factors including the level of profit you’re seeking and the level of risk you’re willing to expose yourself to. We’ve put together a guide to some of the best roulette playing strategies available.

If you didn’t figure out the object of playing roulette by now, you should probably stay away from the wheel. The purpose is to win as much as possible in each session you play and avoid downswings on the long run, silly. On a more serious note, players are supposed to correctly guess the number on which the ball will land after the spin. There are several types of bets to choose from and each of them has a different payout, with the best paying wagers being also the most unlikely to win.


Like most casino games, there are a few different variations of roulette that you will come across, depending on what part of the world you are in and what type of casino you are playing at. If you’re scared we’re about to complicate this easy-to-learn game, don’t worry; the differences in the variations of these games are extremely small but important enough to point out.
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