I am a roulette player. Neither an “editor” nor a “mathematician”. The difference is that I put my money where my mouth is. Most roulette sites are written by editors who have never placed a bet. They recycle knowledge and recite Wikipedia. And they are paid to write. I have paid dearly for every single word I write. I have invested money, time, aspirations and grey matter in roulette.

Their business model is setup to keep the business at the forefront of their decision making, rather than the customer. I won tickets to Chicago via their Instagram, which I was grateful for. However, because it was free, they wouldn't cross it off on my account which was quite disappointing. It is probably the least likely show I would want to see twice, so I would would have to cross of Chicago every time I saw a show diminishing the value provided by the company.
Cross-reference roulette system: Cross referencing is a type of analysis where all available data is considered, and used to detect usable patterns. What makes it special is the data cross-referenced to ensure accuracy. This enables the player to better find hidden patterns in spins, and in less time. Also it enables players to quickly adjust when conditions at the wheel change. The method of cross referencing is not exclusive to roulette, and can be applied to other casino games. But this particular roulette system is combined with other predictive methods that are exclusive to roulette.
If you plan on playing roulette, and want to look cool, then learn and practice the following strategies for best results. There are several strategies that people use for roulette, including the Martingale strategy, the James Bond strategy, and the D'Alembert strategy, among others. Although each of these strategies has its merits, none of them is guaranteed to make you money. In fact, all will lose money in the long run, so know when to quit. But read on to learn how!
Of course, casinos tend to frown on precise measurements and computer simulations by their gamblers, so the researchers developed a simpler method of predicting the outcome of a roulette game that could be deployed without notice. The first step is simply for a player to note the time it takes for the ball to pass a fixed point to get a rough approximation of the velocity of the ball. That approach, according to the researchers, produces results that " although noisy, are feasible" for making predictions.
Never feel like you have to leave or have to stay when you’re playing roulette. Because each spin of the wheel is a completely independent and separate game, you can stay for one roll or stay for hours. If you’re on a roll, literally, you can keep playing and try to put together a big winning session. If things aren’t quite going your way, you’re under no obligation to stay past one roll. This sort of flexibility also allows you to get in a quick session if you need a rush but don’t have a lot of time.

The argument frequently cited in support of this claim is that the numbers on the wheel will add up to 666, so there definitely has to be something unholy going on. You don’t need to a big fan of Goethe and his Faust to fall in love with the game though, but this theory could come in handy when going through a rough streak. It is always better to blame somebody else for your downswings, especially the devil, instead of taking responsibility for erratic gambling behavior.
Like most casino games, there are a few different variations of roulette that you will come across, depending on what part of the world you are in and what type of casino you are playing at. If you’re scared we’re about to complicate this easy-to-learn game, don’t worry; the differences in the variations of these games are extremely small but important enough to point out.
In North America and the Caribbean, roulette wheels have a double zero, and all bets (except a direct bet on the selected zero) are lost when either zero turns up. The result is significantly poorer odds for the punter and an increase in the Casino's cut. This is probably why in this region, Roulette is less popular than it is in other parts of the world.
Those of you have gambled in a casino, even only a few times, have probably stumbled on the Martingale system, even if you didn’t know the word Martingale. You might have even figured you invented it. I know I did. It seems this is the very first concept most gamblers have and it is expressed in the following phrase: “I have to win sooner or later, right?” 
Roulette Computers – These are cheating devices that, realistically, can only be used in real casinos. Without doubt, the use of an effective computer is the best and easiest way to win at roulette, but finding such a device is difficult. Then there’s the fact that in many countries and jurisdictions, they’re illegal and you will end up in jail for using one, so for this reason, we can’t recommend them.

If real wheels isn’t your thing, by far your best option is Betvoyager’s No-zero roulette. Basically the wheel has no house edge, so during the game the casino has no advantage over you. The only catch is when you win, you pay 10% of winnings to the casino. See the image below and you’ll notice there’s no zero on the table. See a detailed review of here.
You will either have a positive or negative edge, and waiting for something to happen like a sequence of numbers will not improve your chances of winning. The exception is if the “trigger” is directly related to a sequence of spins caused by physical variables of the wheel and ball. For example, if the trigger was “bet on whatever number that won most in 10,000 spins”, then this is bias analysis. But the “triggers” that have no effect are like “wait for 5 reds in a row then bet black”.
One last example:  You're betting on #27 every time, because that's one of your lucky numbers.  We expect it to come up once every 38 spins on average.  Luckily for you, it comes up on the 15th spin, making you a tidy profit.  Should you now start making other bets instead, on the assumption that #27 won't hit again soon because it just hit this time?  No.  You can certainly switch to another number if you want, but that won't improve or worsen your chances.  The chances of #27 coming up on a given spin are the same, whether it just come up on the last spin or not: 1 in 38.  I've seen roulette numbers repeat plenty of times.

Dear Readers, I have spent many years studying roulette and have tested all the systems covered on this site except the biased wheel systems and the computers. None of the systems I have tested will win long term when played mechanically. Having said that, I do think it is better to use a system rather than just throwing chips on the table. Although, mathematically it probably doesn’t make that much difference. I feel better about my chances when I have a system that I’ve tested and I know what to expect. And that always includes the reality that I will lose on some of my trips. Try to limit your losses and capitalize on your wins. Easier said than done, I know. Maybe even impossible. Never bet more than you can afford to lose and have fun.

As you’ve seen, the rules of Roulette are really quite simple. Now that you’re caught up with the history and basics of the game, let’s go over betting! Real Money Roulette tables have their own chips, and players are designated different colored chips so the croupier will know who to pay and who to take. Each table also will have a minimum bet posted.
I read an interview that the founder did wherein she said Broadway Roulette prides itself on being all about discovery, i.e funneling people to shows that are new or struggling that the average consumer might not visit on their own. However, someone looking for cheap/random/last-minute Broadway tickets is more likely to see one of those shows due to their low box office cost and sheer availability, so it doesn't seem worthwhile to utilize Broadway Roulette as a service if that's what you're going for. Most of the fun of Broadway Roulette is the gamble --- the chance that you might get a hot show for a low cost --- and yet the service is geared towards those last-minute impulse purchases that a consumer could easily achieve for the same price at a random show's box office if they were so inclined, especially since you don't find out what show you're going to be seeing until that same day.
Casinos will normally post a maximum and a minimum stake for a roulette table and this is sometimes done for recreational play, too. Typically, for each spin of the wheel, if a player the total amount of a player's inside bets must exceed the minimum stake. The listed maximum stake usually shows only the maximum allowed for a single number "straight up" bet. The maximum stakes for other types of bet increases proportionately e.g. The maximum bet allowed for a pair of numbers is double the maximum straight-up bet, the maximum allowed for a corner bet is 4 times the straight up maximum and so on. So that really the limitation is on the amount that the casino can lose!
For example, if you would like to bet that the outcome of the roll will be black, you would place your chips in the space marked for black on the felt. If you would like to bet that the outcome of the roll will be a specific number, you would place your bet right on top of that number on the felt. Want to make multiple bets? No problem. Let’s say you wanted to bet on black and you also wanted to bet on the number 31. You would place one bet onto the black section and then place another bet directly on the number 31.
If you tested 10,000 spins, usually you’ll have approximately an even amount of red and blacks. So it may seem reasonable to assume you could check the previous spins and bet on whichever color spun least. Let’s assume there was no green zero for now. For example, say you checked 1000 previous spins and saw there were 600 reds and 400 blacks. So you then bet on black expecting more blacks to spin because of an “evening out effect”.
Before you start casually throwing down chips and haphazardly betting on every spin of the wheel, take a moment to get acquainted with how roulette works. Whether you’re planning to play online or at a land-based casino, the basic rules governing roulette remain unchanged. With real world play however there’s also casino etiquette to consider. If you want to avoid being mistaken for a newb, knowing the informal rules of roulette is just as important as knowing the formal rules. First do your homework. Then play roulette, with the added confidence that comes from having a deep understanding of how it all works. We’ve assembled a detailed guide to playing roulette that covers all bases. It’ll help you take your roulette game to the next level.
Roulette Computers – These are cheating devices that, realistically, can only be used in real casinos. Without doubt, the use of an effective computer is the best and easiest way to win at roulette, but finding such a device is difficult. Then there’s the fact that in many countries and jurisdictions, they’re illegal and you will end up in jail for using one, so for this reason, we can’t recommend them. 

Few games in a casino are as intimidating to a beginner as the Roulette table – a sea of numbers, colors, and apparent impossibilities. Isn’t it easier to just go press buttons and watch reels spin on a slots machine instead? Surprisingly, no. While the Roulette table may seem confusing at first glance, in fact it’s a wonderfully simple casino game to understand… once you get the hang of it, of course. The key is to learn how to bet properly.
Roulette gives you the option to win in small increments or take risks to win big. Your simpler bets are typically low risk and pay off with you winning double your bet. This is great for the casual player who likes to take their time and enjoy the whole experience. The more risky bets allow players the option to take a chance to win big with payouts as high as 35 to 1! These bets are great for risk takers, excitement seekers, or just the casual player that wants to take a small shot.
Put another way, imagine waiting many years to see the spin sequence 1,2,3,4,5. It seems really rare, and you bet that #6 wont spin next. But actually the odds of #6 spinning next are the same as any other number.  Run some proper simulations and you’ll see no matter how you play it, you cannot change your odds by betting that rare events wont happen.
Here's another way to look at it:  Let's say you bet $10 on every number, one bet on each of the 38 spots.  So you've just thrown down $380 in bets.  Only one of those numbers will win, and will pay 35 to 1, so you'll get back $360 (the $350 you won plus your original $10 bet on that number).  You bet a total of $380 but you walked away with only $360, so you lost $20.  That $20 you lost represents the house edge of 5.26% ($20 lost divided by the $380 that you bet; $20 ÷ $380 = 5.26%).
The history of the game begins more than 300 years ago, at the end of the 17th century, with Frenchman Blaise Pascal being credited with this invention. Apparently, he was trying to create a perpetual motion machine as he was studying probabilities, but the outcome took him by surprise. The roulette wheel gained a lot of traction relatively quickly and by the end of the century, it was a popular game in Paris.
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