Please Note: The Martingale is much like the iceberg that sunk the Titanic. The loss of six to eight hands in a row seems like a real longshot; but the fact is that anyone who has played roulette has seen streaks of red or black, odd or even, or high or low coming up with such frequency many times. Casinos put a cap on how much a person can bet so that such relatively short streaks can sink the Martingale player.

The “house edge” is what enables the casino to profit. An example is the European wheel has 37 pockets, but a 35-1 payout on single numbers. So if you win 1 in 37 as you’d expect with random bet selection, you’d be paid 35 units plus your original bet, leaving you with 36 units. But if roulette’s payouts were fair, you’d be left with 37 units after the 37 spins. Simply the house edge is unfair payouts. And it affects every bet and every roulette strategy. Even when you win, you are still getting paid unfairly.
Those of you have gambled in a casino, even only a few times, have probably stumbled on the Martingale system, even if you didn’t know the word Martingale. You might have even figured you invented it. I know I did. It seems this is the very first concept most gamblers have and it is expressed in the following phrase: “I have to win sooner or later, right?”  

I read an interview that the founder did wherein she said Broadway Roulette prides itself on being all about discovery, i.e funneling people to shows that are new or struggling that the average consumer might not visit on their own. However, someone looking for cheap/random/last-minute Broadway tickets is more likely to see one of those shows due to their low box office cost and sheer availability, so it doesn't seem worthwhile to utilize Broadway Roulette as a service if that's what you're going for. Most of the fun of Broadway Roulette is the gamble --- the chance that you might get a hot show for a low cost --- and yet the service is geared towards those last-minute impulse purchases that a consumer could easily achieve for the same price at a random show's box office if they were so inclined, especially since you don't find out what show you're going to be seeing until that same day.
The argument frequently cited in support of this claim is that the numbers on the wheel will add up to 666, so there definitely has to be something unholy going on. You don’t need to a big fan of Goethe and his Faust to fall in love with the game though, but this theory could come in handy when going through a rough streak. It is always better to blame somebody else for your downswings, especially the devil, instead of taking responsibility for erratic gambling behavior.
Very quickly the bet size increases. Is there any scientific and viable reason why red would spin next? No. And even if there was, this strategy certainly doesn’t consider it. Simply the odds of red and black spinning are always the same. It doesn’t matter even if you had 100 blacks in a row. The odds of red or black spinning next don’t change. Intermediate players may understand this, but they are stuck thinking that eventually they are due to win. The fact is eventually you will win, but this doesn’t mean you will profit. Why is explained below.

First, note that while tickets are billed at just $59 on weekends, after the ticketing fee ($7) and the $10 upgrade to cross off two additional shows (something you'll want to do if you're a person who sees Broadway shows more often than just once in awhile) the ticket is closer to $79, which is what most shows (excluding the hyped productions like Hamilton, Springsteen, Dear Evan Hansen, Book of Mormon, etc.) start at, anyway.
Roulette games have minimum bets, which will be posted on a placard at the table.  Minimum bets work differently for inside bets (specific numbers) and outside bets (everything else).  For outside bets, any bet you make has to be at least the table minimum.  Inside bets can usually be as small as you like, as long as the total of all your inside bets is the table minimum.  For example, with a table minimum of $5, you could put $5 on #14, or $1 each on #14, #27, #8/9, #28/29/30, and #19/20/22/23.  Remember that you can bet inside or outside if you like; there's no requirement to bet both on a given spin. 

Live roulette in a casino is a great game for those looking for a social outing and the live casino experience. If you like getting dressed up and heading out to the casino on a Friday night, live roulette might be the better choice for you. Many people have also expressed that they enjoy physically placing their bets. Something about manipulating and moving all those chips around adds to the rush for some.
A slightly different type of outside bets are those that pay 2-1 as the odds of winning are just 33%. The most popular version is on the Dozens, where players are supposed to bet on the first 12 numbers, the second or the third. The same goes for the Columns bet, with players being also expected to bet on 12 numbers, with the only difference being the distribution on the betting grid. All outside bet are clearly defined on the roulette table with specific places for each bet.
Are online casino games (also known as Internet games) safe? Many of the gambling sites are owned by large casino companies or big businesses that are not looking for controversy or quick cash. They are in the games for the long run, just as land-based casinos are. So compared to the Internet world of three decades ago you will find most of these sites to be honest. There are two ways to check the honesty of an Internet online casino site. If the site passes either of the two tests, or both of them, you can have confidence that you are probably getting a fair deal. It can never hurt to check out gambling sites.

Roulette gained notoriety amongst the elite gambling circles of Monaco following the lucrative addition, and eventually made its way across the ocean to U.S., where it would undergo yet another transformation. This came in the form of a double zero space added to the Roulette wheel, again creating a higher house edge. Today, Roulette has remained on of the most popular games at casinos, whether online or at brick and mortars throughout Europe and the United States. The hugely simple, yet entertaining format of Roulette as well as promises of massive payouts have continued the game’s longevity. You can discover for yourself by playing European Roulette or American Roulette at Planet 7 Online Casino today!


Variations of games very similar to Roulette have been around for hundreds of years, therefore its exact origins are hard to trace. However, the version that we know and love today was devised by a French physicist, inventor and mathematician by the name of Blaise Pascal back in 1655. Of course, a game as seemingly complex as Roulette could only have been invented by a mad scientist – okay, he wasn’t really mad but he was a scientist. Pascal was trying to invent a perpetual motion machine – an experiment that failed in its original endeavor. For the non-science minded, a perpetual motion machine is a device that continues to operate without drawing energy from an outside source. A popular notion in the realm of “science” at the time. Though Pascal failed, he gave the world one of the most popular casino games in existence!
Speaking of money, it’s important to note that money management in Roulette is crucial. Though the rewards of landing a 35:1 odd straight bet might seem enticing, the odds are heavily against you. Just keep in mind that before you wager, set yourself a loss limit. It’s easy to get caught up in the thrill of gambling especially with a group of people cheering the ball on, but a loss is a loss, and money should be managed in moderation. Whichever way the wheels of fortune spin, it’s great if you win big, but you’ll also feel better about yourself if you come away from the table with your bankroll intact.
Try your hand at guessing the ball’s bounce. As the ball spins in the rim around the wheel, notice when it moves past a fixed point, such as the wheel's 0 pocket. Try to guess when the ball will slow down, fall from the rim, and start bouncing off of the deflectors that divide the wheel’s pockets. It’s difficult but, with practice, you may be able to guess which section of the wheel the ball will land after it stops bouncing.[10] 

For any complete novices out there, a roulette wheel is made up of 37 numbered pockets (or 38 if you are playing American roulette – and as an initial piece of advice you shouldn’t, as it decreases your chances of winning!). Half of these numbers are coloured red and half are black with the ‘0’ pocket green. A small ball is introduced when the wheel is spinning and players must predict where the ball will land.
Here's another example: Since there are 38 slots on the wheel, we expect any given number to hit 1 out of 38 spins on average.  Now let's say you've been playing Roulette for a few hours, betting on Red every time, and you've been keeping track of what numbers have hit.  There have been 152 spins (4 x 38), and so we expect that each number should have come up 4 times on average.  You note, with some surprise, that #14 hasn't come up at all.  Does this mean that #14 is "due" and that you should bet on #14?  No.  Number 14 is not "due", no number is ever "due".  The wheel has no memory.
It may seem unbelievable, but most online casinos have refused payouts at some time. Most of the time, it’s because of “strings attached” to deposit bonuses. This isn’t the casino’s fault – it is the player’s for not reading the terms before accepting a bonus. But often the casino just doesn’t want to pay the winnings and will find any excuse. Some real excuses casinos gave are below:
These are the bets we recommend for beginners who want to get more comfortable with roulette. (This does not mean they aren’t great bets for seasoned players, as well.) Instead of betting on specific numbers or groups of numbers, you are betting on what we have termed “the characteristics” of the number. This would include betting on the color of the number or on the evenness or oddness of the number. These bets always pay even money and are as simple as they sound. If you bet black and a black number rolls, you win. If you bet even and an even number rolls, you win. It’s that easy!
If you plan on playing roulette, and want to look cool, then learn and practice the following strategies for best results. There are several strategies that people use for roulette, including the Martingale strategy, the James Bond strategy, and the D'Alembert strategy, among others. Although each of these strategies has its merits, none of them is guaranteed to make you money. In fact, all will lose money in the long run, so know when to quit. But read on to learn how!
Martingale Roulette System – This is a system that involves increasing bets after a loss until you get a win. It is commonly used on Red or Black but it can be applied all over the table if you have the correct progression. Not only have we gone through every bet, we have tables showing the overall loss at each stage and we’ve shown you the odds of going on a bad losing run i.e: 10 Reds in a row when you’re betting on Black.
Casinos will normally post a maximum and a minimum stake for a roulette table and this is sometimes done for recreational play, too. Typically, for each spin of the wheel, if a player the total amount of a player's inside bets must exceed the minimum stake. The listed maximum stake usually shows only the maximum allowed for a single number "straight up" bet. The maximum stakes for other types of bet increases proportionately e.g. The maximum bet allowed for a pair of numbers is double the maximum straight-up bet, the maximum allowed for a corner bet is 4 times the straight up maximum and so on. So that really the limitation is on the amount that the casino can lose!

A lot of players like to watch the past few spins and look for a pattern to try to predict the outcome of the next spin. You’ll see people wait until there are a bunch of red spins in a row and then start betting black heavily because they feel it is much more likely to come out. While this can be a fun strategy and make the game more entertaining, it won’t give you a mathematical edge over the casino. Each spin is 100% independent of the last. This means that no matter what was spin before, the next spin will be completely random.


The first time I tried Broadway Roulette we received tickets to Beautiful. Our tickets were in the back of the orchestra which I wasn't thrilled about, given that the theatre was mostly sort of empty, and that ticket prices at the box office started around what we'd paid for using the service. Similarly, my second experience garnered tickets to The Prom, which I loved, however the seats were in the mezzanine and, when all is said and done after the fees, the ticket price was very close to (if not more) the starting price for tickets to see that show in the same section.
Make outside bets for better odds of winning. As long as you make the table minimum for each individual bet, you can make multiple outside bets to increase your odds of a payout. For instance, if you wager $1 on even and $1 on black, you’ll win a $2 payout if the ball lands on black 10, and you’ll break even if it lands on red 16. Along with even/odd and red/black, which offer payouts of 1:1, outside bets include:[2]
Do you know the difference between a Corner and a Straight Up Bet? How about a Six Line or Street? These are all terms for popular roulette bets and there’s plenty more where that came from. Learn the lingo and learn the types of roulette bets available to you. It’s a smart way of improving your roulette playing and will allow you to approach the game in a more calculating manner, one that will allow you to make your chips go further. Our guide to roulette betting will tell you everything you need to know about the many types of bets at your disposal. 

Stick to your profit goal and loss limit. When it comes to roulette and any other gambling game, you should only bet an amount that you know you can afford to lose. Once you've decided how much money you're willing to lose, stick to that amount and don't be tempted to bet any more. Things can get out of hand quickly, especially with a game that goes so fast.[5]
While I ultimately enjoyed both shows I wound up seeing through the service, I feel that it is not beneficial for someone who sees shows more often than once or twice per year. It is not exactly the great deal you are hoping for when you are first enticed by the flashy weekend promise of a $59 ticket, and if you keep up-to-date with Broadway news (which is likely how you found out about the service in the first place) you will already know about underrated/new shows on Broadway.
The history of the game begins more than 300 years ago, at the end of the 17th century, with Frenchman Blaise Pascal being credited with this invention. Apparently, he was trying to create a perpetual motion machine as he was studying probabilities, but the outcome took him by surprise. The roulette wheel gained a lot of traction relatively quickly and by the end of the century, it was a popular game in Paris.
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