Place your bets. The first six bets are placed on the pockets numbered 0 to 36 on the game table. If you want to bet on column, place your bets on the empty pocket under the three columns. For the dozen, choose the pocket P12 for the first 12 numbers, M 12 for the 12 middle numbers and D 12 for the last 12 numbers. Finally, when you want to bet on the outside bets, use the red, black, even, odd, high or low pockets.
This roulette strategy is the equivalent of a YANS and it might even be more wild and crazy than that. It is based upon the assertion that a chaotic betting system can overcome the chaos of randomness. Two wrongs make a right; that kind of thing. Two wrongs don’t make a right and chaos versus chaos is just, well, chaos versus chaos, as you shall see.
I would use a Martingale only on the even-money outside bets at roulette, the odd or even, high or low, red or black. These bets give the player 18 chances to win with 20 chances to lose on the American double-zero wheels and 18 chances to win with 19 chances to lose on the European Roulette (single-zero wheels). Obviously, if you can play the European wheel that is the preferred one as long as the betting ranges fit your bankroll.
Janae Johnson is a staff writer who loves old movies, meeting new people, exploring the great outdoors, and learning with her hands. After graduating from the College of William and Mary, she applied her degree in English to an ever-expanding industry. She has spent years searching for thrills and fulfillment in her work, until she finally found her home at Planet 7.
We got tickets to see The Prom. We paid $70 each with fees and the upgrade to remove two additional selections and ended up getting tickets on the mezzanine. The price on the ticket indicated $61 which I'm going to assume was BR's negotiated price as it appeared the same tickets would have been about $89 if we bought them ourselves. Not sure I would use this service again as I didn't think it represented that significant of a savings given you don't have control of what you are seeing. However if you are open to seeing anything and just want some inexpensive tickets this is a good way to do it.
Crossing off only four shows leaves you with a lot of chances to receive a show you've already seen, and it's hard not to feel like the selection process is rigged when you a) don't get to see the wheel actually spin and b) following along on social media shows that a majority of people see the same few shows: Kinky Boots, Waitress, Head Over Heels and The Prom. These are shows that you could easily pick up a discounted ticket to using BroadwayBox or purchasing last-minute on StubHub, if not directly from the box office, where tickets usually start around this price, anyway. For example, weekend tickets to The Prom start at $69, to Kinky Boots, $79, and to Head Over Heels, just $49.

The “house edge” is what enables the casino to profit. An example is the European wheel has 37 pockets, but a 35-1 payout on single numbers. So if you win 1 in 37 as you’d expect with random bet selection, you’d be paid 35 units plus your original bet, leaving you with 36 units. But if roulette’s payouts were fair, you’d be left with 37 units after the 37 spins. Simply the house edge is unfair payouts. And it affects every bet and every roulette strategy. Even when you win, you are still getting paid unfairly.
On an American wheel, there are 38 spots: numbers 1-36, plus 0 and 00.  Your odds of winning a one-number bet are 37 to 1 (37 ways to lose, 1 way to win).  But if you win, the casino doesn't pay you 37 to 1, they pay you less: 35 to 1.  The difference between the true odds and what they actually pay you is 2/38, or 5.26%.  You can do this same calculation for the other bets, and it comes out the same.
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